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Thread: irrational fear of flying

  1. #1281
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    Default Re: irrational fear of flying

    https://www.aviacionline.com/2023/09...-engine-parts/

    Occurrence reports have been submitted to the European Union Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) indicating that several CFM56 engine parts distributed by AOG Technics have been supplied with a falsified Authorized Release Certificate (ARC). In each confirmed example, the approved organisation, identified on the ARC, has attested that the form did not originate from within their organisation, and the certificate has been falsified
    and: https://simpleflying.com/united-airl...-engine-parts/

    United Airlines, Southwest Airlines, and Virgin Airlines have all discovered faulty engine parts supplied by fraudulent manufacturer AOG Technics.
    This is terrifying to me, though I guess there's some comfort in the fact that it was discovered.

  2. #1282
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    Default Re: irrational fear of flying

    Interesting article about an 11-hour proving flight, which is part of the process of certifying the new Airbus A321XLR.

    https://www.flightradar24.com/blog/a...mpaign=website
    rw saunders
    hey, how lucky can one man get.

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    Default Re: irrational fear of flying

    Quote Originally Posted by randonneur View Post
    https://www.aviacionline.com/2023/09...-engine-parts/



    and: https://simpleflying.com/united-airl...-engine-parts/



    This is terrifying to me, though I guess there's some comfort in the fact that it was discovered.
    Except there is never one cockroach. There are more like this.

    Give the broker immunity, you need to find the fake manufacturer and the rest of the ecosystem.
    I doubt the idiot director of the broker is the mastermind.

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    Default Re: irrational fear of flying

    Well damn, apparently the FAA is facing two different potential lapses (lapse of working federal budget and lapse in authorization to collect taxes from airline). How is the latter even possible?

    Article here (gift link).

    What's difficult to comprehend about the latter is that the agency for which I work never needs renewal of authorization to charge for services.

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    Default Re: irrational fear of flying

    Quote Originally Posted by echappist View Post
    Well damn, apparently the FAA is facing two different potential lapses (lapse of working federal budget and lapse in authorization to collect taxes from airline). How is the latter even possible?

    Article here (gift link).

    What's difficult to comprehend about the latter is that the agency for which I work never needs renewal of authorization to charge for services.
    I've always felt the problem with partial government shutdowns is that they're partial. If everything ground to a screeching halt, the idiots in congress would learn to compromise pretty quickly. And I say that as a civil servant who will be furloughed with guaranteed back pay.

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    Default Re: irrational fear of flying

    Quote Originally Posted by bcm119 View Post
    I've always felt the problem with partial government shutdowns is that they're partial. If everything ground to a screeching halt, the idiots in congress would learn to compromise pretty quickly. And I say that as a civil servant who will be furloughed with guaranteed back pay.
    You are right, of course.

    And sorry to hear of the potential furlough. Hope things turn out well.

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    Default Re: irrational fear of flying

    Quote Originally Posted by bcm119 View Post
    I've always felt the problem with partial government shutdowns is that they're partial. If everything ground to a screeching halt, the idiots in congress would learn to compromise pretty quickly. And I say that as a civil servant who will be furloughed with guaranteed back pay.
    Shutdown should mean congress critters are also not paid, and have only limited access to the benefits of their offices (as in, enough access to work it out and restart the gov't)

    I'm currently scheduled to fly within the next week. Keeping the plan for now, sort of interested to see if my TSA pre-check status lessens the pain if the shutdown happens.
    Last edited by 72gmc; 09-28-2023 at 01:22 PM.
    Dan Fuller, local bicycle enthusiast

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    Default Re: irrational fear of flying

    Full moon, 38,000 feet over Greenland.
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    Default Re: irrational fear of flying

    Quote Originally Posted by 72gmc View Post
    Shutdown should mean congress critters are also not paid...
    Thus the gold bullion in the sock drawer of the distinguished gentleman from New Jersey. Rainy day or government shutdown - same same.
    Jorn Ake
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    Default Re: irrational fear of flying

    The Big Read- Bloomberg

    Airlines Are Racing to Hunt Down the Fake Parts in Their Fleets
    2023-10-11 23:00:09.991 GMT


    By Julie Johnsson, Ryan Beene, Siddharth Vikram Philip and
    Sabah Meddings
    (Bloomberg) -- This spring, engineers at TAP Air Portugal’s
    maintenance subsidiary huddled around an aircraft engine that
    had come in for repair. The exposed CFM56 turbine looked like
    just another routine job for a shop that handles more than 100
    engines a year. Only this time, there was cause for alarm.
    Workers noticed that a replacement part, a damper to reduce
    vibration, showed signs of wear, when the accompanying paperwork
    identified the component as fresh from the production line. On
    June 21, TAP pointed out the discrepancy to Safran SA, the
    French aerospace company that makes CFM engines together with
    General Electric Co.
    Safran quickly determined that the paperwork had been
    forged. The signature wasn’t that of a company employee, and the
    reference and purchase order numbers on the part also didn’t add
    up.
    To date, Safran and GE have uncovered more than 90 other
    certificates that had similarly been falsified, all linked to
    the same parts distributor in London: AOG Technics Ltd., a
    little-known outfit started eight years ago by a young
    entrepreneur named Jose Alejandro Zamora Yrala.
    While engineers are trained to spot components of dubious
    origin, “it’s always shocking when we have one in front of our
    eyes,” said a person familiar with the revelation, who asked not
    to be identified discussing internal deliberations.

    The discovery by an alert crew in Lisbon blew the cover off
    a massive aviation fraud that has left engine makers and their
    customers in a frantic race to stem the fallout. As a result of
    the fabrications, thousands of parts with improper documentation
    have wound up at airlines, distributors and workshops around the
    globe. From there, they’ve ended up inside jet engines,
    effectively contaminating a growing portion of the world’s most
    widely flown airliner fleet.
    This story is based on legal and corporate filings,
    regulatory disclosures and social-media accounts, as well as
    information obtained from industry executives and people
    familiar with Zamora’s career, who asked not to be identified
    given the sensitive nature of the relationships.
    All major US carriers and half a dozen others have
    identified bogus parts from AOG on their airplanes. While no
    flight emergencies have been called due to engine malfunctions,
    the audacity of the scam, dating back several years, highlights
    a risky gap in a system that’s made flying the world’s safest
    form of transportation. And the ease at which safety protocols
    were breached has prompted soul-searching in an industry where a
    decades-old system has suddenly revealed worrying loopholes.
    “If people want to cheat, it’s going to be hard to stop
    them,” said Tim Zemanovic, who runs Fillmore Aviation LLC, a
    Minneapolis-area company that sells recycled aircraft parts.
    “There’s a lot of trust involved.”
    Read more: Fake Spare Parts Were Supplied to Fix Top-
    Selling Jet Engine
    Hardly a week has passed by since late August, when
    Bloomberg first reported on the scandal, without another airline
    finding so-called suspected unapproved parts on older-generation
    Airbus SE A320 or Boeing Co. 737 aircraft. Complicating the
    search is the fact that the CFM56 is by far the most widely
    flown engine, with more than 22,000 units still in service — a
    CFM56-powered aircraft takes off every two seconds somewhere on
    the planet. Given the global nature of aviation, parts with
    fabricated certificates have now washed up everywhere, from the
    US to China to as far away as Australia.
    Behind the furor is an upstart distributor with the veneer
    of respectability. On its now-deleted website, AOG boasted of
    warehouses in the UK, Singapore, Frankfurt and Miami, calling
    itself a “leading global aircraft support provider’’ with a
    mission to “keep our clients flying.’’ Its inventory of parts
    was listed on the biggest online clearinghouse. A quality-
    assurance organization endorsed by the Federal Aviation
    Administration had accredited AOG’s practices.
    It was all a charade. The obscure distributor hoodwinked
    the biggest names in aviation, selling thousands of jet-engine
    parts with forged airworthiness records, according to regulators
    and industry executives. In some cases, AOG allegedly sold
    refurbished used parts with paperwork claiming they were brand-
    new, potentially netting huge profits in the process. And the
    company may have done so by exploiting what critics say is a
    decades-old blind spot in the aviation regulatory system.
    “It’s a bit strange that a phantom company can be allowed
    to supply spare parts with false certification documents,”
    Safran Chief Executive Officer Olivier Andries said. “We don’t
    know who they sold those parts to and whether all airlines have
    done their checks.”
    Historically, regulators have kept a watchful eye over
    airlines and the planes they put into the sky. Individual parts
    that get swapped in and out when a jet comes in for repairs have
    their own carefully documented history. Bundles of paperwork
    tell a story of inspections, overhauls and whether a part can
    still be safely used.
    Such relentless obsession with safety and record-keeping
    can’t mask the fact that within the industry lies an essentially
    self-regulated, highly lucrative marketplace: parts
    distribution. Here, intermediaries help circulate hundreds of
    thousands of parts each year between manufacturers, airlines and
    repair stations. Personal connections mean sourcing specialists
    buy and sell from vendors they know.

    Into this clubby world stepped a young, part-time DJ
    originally from Venezuela. In 2015, Zamora established AOG in
    Hove, corporate records show. From the sleepy coastal town about
    an hour’s train ride south of London, Zamora spent the next few
    years expanding his network. He eventually relocated to an
    upmarket London office address — in reality, just a mail drop
    rented from a co-working provider.
    Zamora hasn’t engaged in attempts to get his side of the
    story. Reached briefly by phone on Oct. 5, he hung up when he
    was told he was speaking with a reporter. Zamora’s wife, Sarah
    Leddin, said that Bloomberg had been “trying to paint him out
    to be some bad person or something.”
    “He doesn’t want to talk to anyone because the information
    is fabricated at best,” she said by phone. Zamora’s barrister,
    Tom Cleaver with the legal firm Blackstone Chambers, hasn’t
    responded to attempts seeking comment.
    Long-term acquaintances say they’ve not heard from Zamora
    in months. He told Doug Hensley, the chief safety and regulatory
    counsel at GE Aerospace, on Aug. 2 that he was out of the
    country on vacation. He had, however, in the meantime stopped
    selling GE and CFM-related parts “as a courtesy,’’ legal filings
    show.
    GE and Safran are now facing off with AOG in a London
    court. The CFM International engine-making partners had sought a
    court order for the documents relating to “every single sale of
    products.” AOG produced the records on Oct. 4, giving CFM fresh
    potential leads.
    The European Union Aviation Safety Agency said it has no
    power to investigate AOG because suppliers are not regulated.
    The FAA said it encourages companies to maintain a system to
    detect unapproved parts and to review their suppliers.
    Maintenance companies and airlines that repair planes have the
    responsibility to ensure any component installed on an aircraft
    is an approved, legitimate part, and the FAA lacks the resources
    to do so, a spokesperson said. The UK Civil Aviation Authority
    said it supports the FAA and EASA as they look into the supply
    of unapproved parts by AOG.
    Born in 1988, Zamora dabbled in professions from music to
    real estate before settling into the world of aircraft parts.
    For a while, he spun techno tunes under the stage name Santa
    Militia in Venezuela, Italy and Spain. In 2022, he married
    Leddin, an interior designer, on the island of Mallorca. The
    couple was photographed at the rural luxury retreat, sporting
    matching Rolex watches and cradling a pair of babies dressed in
    identical cream-colored rompers.
    Zamora began his aerospace career around 2010 as an account
    manager at AJW, a prominent engine maintenance provider better
    known as Walters in aviation circles. There, he dealt with
    airlines based in Latin America — from AeroMexico and Avianca to
    Brazil’s GOL. He later moved on to the UK operation of Florida-
    based maintenance company GA Telesis LLC, before eventually
    setting up AOG.

    He typically worked from home, logging onto the ILS
    platform, an aerospace-parts marketplace, to check out requests
    from airlines and maintenance shops and which components were
    available, according to a person familiar with his routine.
    AOG started off humbly. After a year in business, the
    brokerage had just £7,804 in cash, company filings show. The
    fledgling company moved from residence to residence around the
    London area over the next few years as its sales gradually grew.
    By early 2019, it had £18,295 in cash and made a profit of
    £22,042, the records show.
    Then business abruptly prospered. For the year ending
    February 2020, AOG reported £2.43 million in cash and a profit
    of £2.2 million, company records show. That’s shortly after AOG
    began selling thousands of jet-engine parts with falsified
    documents, the engine makers allege, in what Matthew Reeve, a
    lawyer for CFM, has described in legal filings as a
    sophisticated deception “on an industrial scale.”
    Legal filings reveal the scope and means of the alleged
    fraud. Forgeries turned up at an engine services provider
    northeast of London, a parts supplier in Florida, a maintenance
    firm in Scandinavia, an airline in Africa and another
    maintenance outfit incorporated in Germany, among others.
    How an intensely regulated and safety-obsessed industry
    could be deceived by a single rogue outfit remains one of the
    big mysteries of the unfolding case.
    Forged records cited by CFM’s lawyers were dated as far
    back as 2018, suggesting a years-long deception. Some bore faked
    signatures of actual Safran employees, while others were signed
    off by former workers. Then there’s a certain Geoffrey Chirac,
    who shares a last name with the late French president. CFM says
    in legal filings his signature was forged.
    Other signatories appear to have also been fabricated:
    several forms were signed by a Michael Smith. His now-deleted
    LinkedIn profile presented him as a purported AOG quality
    assurance manager.
    But his profile picture can also be found on stock-image
    sites, where he’s described as a “confident senior man in white
    T-shirt.” The photo is particularly popular in the medical
    profession, featuring on the websites of a Wisconsin
    cardiologist, an Oregon dentist and a Barcelona rectal surgeon.
    LinkedIn profiles of some purported AOG executives also
    used stock photos that appeared on other websites. Companies
    listed on the profiles as former employers say they have no
    records of these people.
    Read more: Bogus Supplier of Jet-Engine Parts May Have Fake
    Workers Too
    How an intensely regulated and safety-obsessed industry
    could be deceived by a single rogue outfit remains one of the
    big mysteries of the unfolding case. It’s a vulnerability the
    aviation industry has been dealing with for decades, but has
    never successfully addressed.
    The most high-profile accident involving fake parts
    occurred on Sept. 8, 1989, when Partnair Flight 394 carrying 55
    people from Oslo to Hamburg crashed into the sea, killing
    everyone on board. Investigators later determined that
    counterfeit bolts and brackets had caused the tail section of
    the Convair CV-580 turboprop to vibrate violently and eventually
    tear loose.
    A rash of bogus aircraft parts sparked a furor in the
    1990s. As the US Transportation Department’s Inspector General
    at the time, Mary Schiavo led investigations into fake parts
    that helped secure about 120 criminal convictions between 1990
    and 1996.
    She told a Senate oversight panel in 1995 that the industry
    was so awash with suspect components that one “must unavoidably
    draw this conclusion: if it is a part of an airplane, it could
    be bogus.” She also sparred with FAA officials, whom she accused
    of downplaying the potential risks posed by unapproved parts.
    In Schiavo’s view, AOG’s alleged misdeeds show that
    vulnerability continues to exist today.
    “We were busting people and sending them to prison 20 years
    ago for this,” she said in an interview. “It’s the same old
    scheme.”
    The FAA released a voluntary program in 1996 for parts
    sellers to agree to audits and other checks by industry
    organizations in order to accredit their quality practices. The
    idea was to address a lack of documentation and traceability
    plaguing distributors at the time, without further straining the
    FAA’s already limited resources.
    Almost three decades later, bogus parts continue to pose
    possible safety risks. And as if to illustrate the point, CFM
    made another, more troubling discovery: having reviewed nearly
    600 of its material suppliers, it, too had been directly duped
    by AOG.
    The engine maker’s own shops installed parts sold by AOG in
    16 CFM56 engines. In four instances, parts from the rogue firm
    made their way into CFM’s network, including one lot purchased
    directly from the UK company.

    Subsequently, CFM inspectors noticed some major
    discrepancies with the parts in question, which AOG had
    represented as brand-new. For example, the low-pressure turbine
    blades CFM bought weren’t as bright as they should have been.
    They also showed signs of welding and residual corrosion,
    something that shouldn’t have appeared on new parts.
    CFM concluded that the parts were in fact repaired, used
    components. The company says it plans to review its practices
    for evaluating suppliers.
    “What you need to do is know that your supply chain, the
    providers you’re dealing with, are reputable,” said Willie
    Walsh, director general of the International Air Transport
    Association. “It’s like anything: know who your partner is, know
    their track record, that they know who their partners are and
    that the chain is secure.”
    “Hopefully you have a routine to go through all your
    thousands of records one by one to see if AOG was in them — and
    to look three suppliers deep.”
    While quality departments are meant to keep an eye out for
    suspicious activity — and the threat of jail to discourage faked
    parts and forged documents — there are real-world limitations.
    In practice, documentation relies on paper records, and there is
    no centralized repository, meaning much of the verification is
    performed on the basis of faith in the records.
    The financial and operational cost of having to remove
    parts stands to be considerable. Charges could quickly rise to
    about $300,000 per engine, depending on how deep teams need to
    furrow, said Adil Slimani, the director of aftermarket advisory
    at consultant IBA Group. Then there’s the lost revenue from
    idling an aircraft that is an industry workhorse.
    “Hopefully you have a routine to go through all your
    thousands of records one by one to see if AOG was in them — and
    to look three suppliers deep,” said Roy Resto, a consultant who
    specializes in aircraft maintenance.
    Airlines that have discovered suspect parts have been
    advised by regulators to remove them. In the case of AOG, these
    have turned out not to be harmless components like armrests or
    coffee machines, but instead bearings and turbine blades crucial
    to a modern jet engine.
    In a worst case, they could be discarded or damaged
    components that have no business being in the unforgiving heart
    of a jet engine. There, temperatures run hotter than the melting
    point of metal and blades can spin at more than 10,000
    revolutions per minute.
    For now at least, AOG’s alleged misdeeds don’t appear to
    present an immediate risk to flight safety. There’s no evidence
    that so-called life-limited parts — the most safety-critical
    components in an engine that by law must be removed after a
    certain number of flights — were involved. Examples in court
    filings point to used components masquerading as new, rather
    than wholesale knock-offs.
    Still, the AOG scandal renews questions about what critics
    say has been a weak link in aviation safety for decades.
    In 2021, AOG’s operations were accredited by Transonic
    Aviation Consultants Inc., one of only a handful of
    organizations deemed acceptable by the FAA to confer that
    designation. By then, AOG’s alleged scheme was already well
    under way.
    Transonic CEO Bob Pina said a subcontractor hired by his
    firm inspected AOG’s operation in London and reported back that
    everything appeared to be in order. Pina said he stripped the
    company of its accreditation in early September, immediately
    after learning of the alleged forgeries.
    Like others in the industry, Pina said he was “bamboozled”
    by Zamora, saying there was little he could do head off his
    alleged misdeeds.
    “You can’t do any type of inspection to find out if people
    are bad,” Pina said. “They appeared to be good, but once you
    turn your back on them, rats will do what rats will do.”

    One of the world’s largest parts distributors is pushing to
    bring more oversight to their business. GA Telesis CEO Abdol
    Moabery has urged lawmakers in Washington to convene a hearing
    about unapproved parts in aviation, in the hope that Congress
    will push the FAA to impose some form of regulation on companies
    like his. But tracing parts and providing seamless documentation
    is time-consuming and costly.
    “I have 17 inspectors that do nothing but look at
    paperwork,” Moabery said. “That’s expensive.”
    The temptation to cut corners won’t go away any time soon.
    A post-Covid shortage of both parts and labor has dramatically
    crimped aircraft availability, putting additional pressure on
    airlines and maintenance shops — and creating a fertile ground
    for opportunists.
    This squeeze is especially acute for older engines that
    power a previous generation of narrowbody Airbus and Boeing
    workhorses. While airlines are slowly moving to newer models,
    their predecessors are still among the most popular aircraft in
    the skies today.
    “Wherever there’s money, there’s fraud,” said Zemanovic,
    the Minneapolis parts recycler.

    --With assistance from Albertina Torsoli, Henrique Almeida,
    Anthony Palazzo, Kate Duffy, Mary Schlangenstein, Peter Robison,
    Charlotte Ryan, Guy Johnson, Upmanyu Trivedi, Nicolle Yapur and
    Patricia Laya.

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    Default Re: irrational fear of flying

    My son's (far right) first Flight Suit Friday in Pensacola. He'll head to Corpus Christi next month to fly the T-6.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Retired Sailor, Marine dad, semi-professional cyclist, fly fisherman, and Indian School STEM teacher.
    Assistant Operating Officer at Farm Soap homemade soaps. www.farmsoap.com

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    Default Re: irrational fear of flying



    Howard Hughes’ plane had been in maintenance for quite a while and finally made it back into service for my ride home.
    rw saunders
    hey, how lucky can one man get.

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    Default Re: irrational fear of flying

    Remember never choose the fish for dinner.
    (At your LBS now)

    2023-10-14_15-47-35.jpg

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    Default Re: irrational fear of flying

    Quote Originally Posted by rwsaunders View Post
    Howard Hughes’ plane had been in maintenance for quite a while and finally made it back into service for my ride home.
    Not a big fan of the current incarnation of AA, but I am fond of the retro liveries. Polished aluminum 1960s vintage AA was always my fave. I especially loved the Lockheed L188 Electra in the polished finish. Always heard it was a real “pilot’s airplane.”

    Greg
    Old age and treachery beat youth and enthusiasm every time…

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    Default Re: irrational fear of flying

    Quote Originally Posted by gregl View Post
    Not a big fan of the current incarnation of AA, but I am fond of the retro liveries. Polished aluminum 1960s vintage AA was always my fave. I especially loved the Lockheed L188 Electra in the polished finish. Always heard it was a real “pilot’s airplane.”

    Greg
    My first ever commercial flight as a passenger was on AA. I assumed when I started flying I would either be with them or Swissair. I ended up with a close cousin and successor to the latter and have, in the past 30+ years been on AA airplanes only twice. Both were fine experiences and I thank for the for the free ride! ;-) But I am only peripherally aware of them today other than that they take forever to taxi to the runway and they never have their numbers when they call for taxi. How does that work? Today I couldn’t be further from either but I’m still drawing a paycheck in the business and for that I’m grateful. I’m nostalgic when I see my first employer at LAX or ORD or MIA and hope to dog I don’t have to taxi behind AA when I’m at any of those places! All kidding aside, they’re pros and know what they’re doing in the skies.

    The most visible aircraft in that picture is the much maligned 737-8 MAX. I have now got many hundreds of hours on the variant and enjoy it very much. It’s a worthy successor to a 1960’s cousin of a 1950’s design!
    La Cheeserie!

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    Default Re: irrational fear of flying

    I just saw this.


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    Default Re: irrational fear of flying

    Silly question for the pilots here: are the seats in the cockpit in good shape, usually? Good support, well maintained? Or do you have to be ready for a seat that’s flattened out, and travel with a seat pad? I’m often padding the gap where lower back support should be, but I do fly economy.
    Dan Fuller, local bicycle enthusiast

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    Default Re: irrational fear of flying

    Quote Originally Posted by 72gmc View Post
    Silly question for the pilots here: are the seats in the cockpit in good shape, usually? Good support, well maintained? Or do you have to be ready for a seat that’s flattened out, and travel with a seat pad? I’m often padding the gap where lower back support should be, but I do fly economy.
    The seats are fine. Extremely adjustable. I don’t use any back support but I’ve seen some folks who use a supplemental thing for their back or butt. But the seats are generally quite comfortable and supportive. They are not at all like passenger seats.
    Last edited by Saab2000; 10-15-2023 at 06:53 AM.
    La Cheeserie!

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    Default Re: irrational fear of flying

    Quote Originally Posted by 72gmc View Post
    Silly question for the pilots here: are the seats in the cockpit in good shape, usually? Good support, well maintained? Or do you have to be ready for a seat that’s flattened out, and travel with a seat pad? I’m often padding the gap where lower back support should be, but I do fly economy.
    Quote Originally Posted by Saab2000 View Post
    The seats are fine. Extremely adjustable. I don’t use any back support but I’ve seen some folks who use a supplemental thing for their back or butt. But the seats are generally quite comfortable and supportive. They are not at all like passenger seats.
    My experiences were very similar. The seats in small, general aviation aircraft were nothing special, but they were quite nice in business turboprops and jets. The larger and longer-range jets had very expensive pilot seats with many adjustments. They were typically covered in sheepskin too. My longest duration in a pilot seat was about 6 hours and I don’t recall much (if any) discomfort.

    In addition to seat adjustments, most large aircraft have adjustable rudder pedals too. This allows for pilots of varied heights and body proportions to not only be comfortable, but also achieve an optimum sight picture for flying the aircraft. All the jets I flew had a sight reference indicator or device that enabled the pilots to consistently put their seats in the same, optimum position. Here’s an interesting article on proper pilot seating positions: https://safetyfirst.airbus.com/are-you-properly-seated/

    Greg
    Old age and treachery beat youth and enthusiasm every time…

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    Default Re: irrational fear of flying

    Thanks, both of you. I’m glad you are comfortable!

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