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Thread: Why do I grip the grips so tightly?

  1. #21
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    Default Re: Why do I grip the grips so tightly?

    Good stuff in here, much of which I am still mulling over - MTB technique threads are some of my favorites.

    Grip diameter - this is too obvious for me to have thought of, but I can do way more chinups on my home Iron Gym (1.25") vs the park chinup bar (2"). Thinking about this.

    Foot "grip". I am doing this! Never thought about it, but I am. Very interesting.
    @ToddHollandpe I can't for the life of me figure out the difference between a chinup grip and a screwdriver grip. Can you elaborate? Which one have I been doing wrong this whole time?
     

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    Default Re: Why do I grip the grips so tightly?

    I dunno...it seems its all about technique. The rider is sitting on two large gyroscopes. Fighting them just gets you tired. They know what to do. Just let them do it and go with the flow. There is nothing good that comes from holding the grips tightly. It makes you tired and it makes it harder to react to terrain.

    It's one of those counterintuitive things. Like in downhill skiing, all the natural things to do are wrong: leaning into the hill, leaning back, straightening the downhill leg, etc. A new skier has to unlearn all the natural impulses.

    Riding on gnarly terrain to me is like hitting a series of targets. I want to go to the left of that rock, then 30 feet later in between those two ruts, then 20 feet later over the smaller of the two rocks, etc. What the bike does in between the targets, the bike does. It knows what to do. I just give it input to hit the targets and relax the rest of the time, even if the bike is bouncing and skittering like a deranged squirrel on cocaine. My POV: I spent a decade riding motocross bikes. There is no way to win a wresting match with one of those. It's zen to win.
     

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    Default Re: Why do I grip the grips so tightly?

    Remy Metailler's tips on brake lever setup. At about 6 minutes, he makes an interesting point about body weight creating grip vs. white knuckles.

    Dan Fuller, local bicycle enthusiast

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    Default Re: Why do I grip the grips so tightly?

    Quote Originally Posted by zambenini View Post
    Good stuff in here, much of which I am still mulling over - MTB technique threads are some of my favorites.
    Only a little unrelated to the thread but mountain bike lessons are the best thing I've done for my riding ever.
     

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    Default Re: Why do I grip the grips so tightly?

    Zambenini, the screwdriver grip is where your forearm is not perpendicular to the handlebar, it’s at a decent angle. It’s like anything you’d try to hold and use with finesse: hockey stick, tennis racquet, even a baseball bat when it comes over the plate.

    That video showed it a little, maybe this is better?


    Screwdriver hands - Album on Imgur

    And how far inboard are most people running their brake levers from the end of the grips? I noticed on my new bike they’re farther inboard than the old bike, but the new one has hydraulic brakes set up for one-finger use. The old bike had BB7’s and I used two fingers on the levers, as evidenced by the wear marks.

    PS I dig the ESI grips but not the thick ones, but I don’t dig how easily they get torn up from hitting trees. The Ritchey True Grips are probably my favorite. They get a little firmer with age, are just as grippy when wet, and are surprisingly durable for foam. And I’m not out of hairspray yet.
    Trod Harland, Physical Educator

    [I]Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced. James Baldwin

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    Default Re: Why do I grip the grips so tightly?

    14608107_1180665285312703_1558693314_n.jpg

    Its probably your brakes.
    Got some cash
    Bought some wheels
    Took it out
    'Cross the fields
    Lost Control
    Hit a wall
    But we're alright

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    Default Re: Why do I grip the grips so tightly?

    I ride mostly 30 min laps up for 3 min laps down. For me I set my slightly saddle nose down because 1. my rear suspension is set for 25-30% sag under my weight and b. because when my seat is up I'm heading uphill and the front wheel is higher than the rear. This shortens reach, raises handlebar height, changes saddle setback and tilt. All the things. If your riding style is climb for a long time/descend for a long time and you have a dropper post then try setting your saddle up for comfort on the climbs.

    For me the light hands thing doesn't work for descending. Modern mountain bikes (especially anything post-2018 Transition Sentinel version 1 and all of the reduced-rake forked bikes made today) require weight on the front wheel. Why? Because we don't get back we get low. This enables us to weight the handlebars and drive the front wheel into the ground. Boom. Traction. Steering. All the things. This also enables us to use our limbs. Picture yourself arms locked, all the way off the back of the bike with the seat up heading toward an 18" ledge. What happens? Can you steer? Are you feeling the sensation of your bike yanking you forward even though everything in your body is saying no? Now picture your seat down, your elbows bent, chest toward the bars approaching that ledge. As your front wheel goes over you extend your arms, your front wheel makes contact with the ground as your arms pushed down, and your bike seat wasn't up high to clip your lower back and ass throwing your weight over the bars. Weight those bars, boys.

    For me I've found the limit of raising brake levers. I wasn't even close to the near-flat brake lever position of Remi Metallier or Yoann Barelli (YouTubers!). But as my levers crept up, my weight kept heading toward the back of the bike. I lost that front wheel traction and all of a sudden it was pre-2018 again. I'm saying for me the near-level brake levers undid the advancements made in geometry and the bike rode like shit. See above: math meme lady. For me on my current bike I keep the levers just slightly north of 45 degrees.

    For me the biggest cause of hand pain is riding the brakes. I ride the brakes when I don't trust them. I ride big heavy very-stoppy 4 piston brakes with metallic pads and big rotors. I can one-finger it to safety any time I want. I also don't run a certain company's beloved brakes with wandering bite points, because I don't want to overcook a turn. And even if I ride out and overcooked turn I don't want to over-brake going into every other turn worried about overcooking a turn. Predictable braking means I can let them them go when I want. For rough descending- we've agreed we are wighting the bars, yes?- I'm not holding my body up and clenching my fists simultaneously. I'm taking some abuse but I'm not taking unnecessary abuse. I know I've got the tools I need for the job at hand.

    Finally, I don't believe in a god. But if I did it would be a she and she would've made the Deity Knuckleduster grip just for me.
    Got some cash
    Bought some wheels
    Took it out
    'Cross the fields
    Lost Control
    Hit a wall
    But we're alright

  8. #28
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    Default Re: Why do I grip the grips so tightly?

    Quote Originally Posted by chasea View Post
    I ride mostly 30 min laps up for 3 min laps down. For me I set my slightly saddle nose down because 1. my rear suspension is set for 25-30% sag under my weight and b. because when my seat is up I'm heading uphill and the front wheel is higher than the rear. This shortens reach, raises handlebar height, changes saddle setback and tilt. All the things. If your riding style is climb for a long time/descend for a long time and you have a dropper post then try setting your saddle up for comfort on the climbs.

    For me the light hands thing doesn't work for descending. Modern mountain bikes (especially anything post-2018 Transition Sentinel version 1 and all of the reduced-rake forked bikes made today) require weight on the front wheel. Why? Because we don't get back we get low. This enables us to weight the handlebars and drive the front wheel into the ground. Boom. Traction. Steering. All the things. This also enables us to use our limbs. Picture yourself arms locked, all the way off the back of the bike with the seat up heading toward an 18" ledge. What happens? Can you steer? Are you feeling the sensation of your bike yanking you forward even though everything in your body is saying no? Now picture your seat down, your elbows bent, chest toward the bars approaching that ledge. As your front wheel goes over you extend your arms, your front wheel makes contact with the ground as your arms pushed down, and your bike seat wasn't up high to clip your lower back and ass throwing your weight over the bars. Weight those bars, boys.

    For me I've found the limit of raising brake levers. I wasn't even close to the near-flat brake lever position of Remi Metallier or Yoann Barelli (YouTubers!). But as my levers crept up, my weight kept heading toward the back of the bike. I lost that front wheel traction and all of a sudden it was pre-2018 again. I'm saying for me the near-level brake levers undid the advancements made in geometry and the bike rode like shit. See above: math meme lady. For me on my current bike I keep the levers just slightly north of 45 degrees.

    For me the biggest cause of hand pain is riding the brakes. I ride the brakes when I don't trust them. I ride big heavy very-stoppy 4 piston brakes with metallic pads and big rotors. I can one-finger it to safety any time I want. I also don't run a certain company's beloved brakes with wandering bite points, because I don't want to overcook a turn. And even if I ride out and overcooked turn I don't want to over-brake going into every other turn worried about overcooking a turn. Predictable braking means I can let them them go when I want. For rough descending- we've agreed we are wighting the bars, yes?- I'm not holding my body up and clenching my fists simultaneously. I'm taking some abuse but I'm not taking unnecessary abuse. I know I've got the tools I need for the job at hand.

    Finally, I don't believe in a god. But if I did it would be a she and she would've made the Deity Knuckleduster grip just for me.
    I think we are probably seeing this similarly. When I say "light hands, heavy feet" I'm not describing weight being rearward, but rather center of mass driving through the feet. When in a low position, with hip hinge, one's weight is naturally towards the front wheel, but the arms are not necessarily carrying the weight.

    IMO, this whole conversation is a great one. Chris Kilmurray and Jordi Cortes recently did a video on the topic of body position.
     

  9. #29
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    Default Re: Why do I grip the grips so tightly?

    Quote Originally Posted by jscottyk View Post
    ...IMO, this whole conversation is a great one. Chris Kilmurray and Jordi Cortes recently did a video on the topic of body position.
    Chris did a great follow up blog post too.
     

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