User Tag List

Page 1 of 6 123456 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 119

Thread: Rigid 29ers

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Barcelona
    Posts
    2,227
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Rigid 29ers

    Are you guys that ride a lot in favor or against?

    I'm intrigued since coming across a rigid Ingleheart recently
     

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Toronto, ON, Canada
    Posts
    393
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Rigid 29ers

    Quote Originally Posted by holliscx View Post
    Are you guys that ride a lot in favor or against?

    I'm intrigued since coming across a rigid Ingleheart recently
    I built a HT 29er frame with a rigid fork as a place holder, thinking that I would move on to a suspension fork when I found one that suited me. I tried the bike with a reasonably low end 100 mm suspension fork. Rationally, it was faster and more capable with suspension, but I didn't really like the way the fork interfered with my riding. The brake dive, and pogo-ing during out of the saddle efforts annoyed me. I went back to rigid, and I like it that way.

    As an addendum to my comments, the trails I ride regularly are not especially rugged or technical. To me the rigid set up makes the trails I ride more challenging, and thus more enjoyable. I am sure there is terrain that would have me begging for a good suspension fork, but such trails are not on the menu for me at the moment.

    Also, I would like to add that the one thing I do not like about my current frame fork combination is the excessively long and flexible 'rigid' fork that is required by my suspension ready frame. I would love it if the frame was built around a ~440 mm fork instead of 490 mm. So I would probably be pretty happy with the frame you are looking at, if it fit me.
    Last edited by darkmother; 01-14-2017 at 07:09 PM. Reason: Thought of something else to add after posting
     

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Lake Mohegan, NY
    Posts
    1,766
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Rigid 29ers

    A while ago, I bought a Vicious Cycles "The Motivator" 29er. Local trails are fairly technical, rocks and roots, but not super chunky. I rode it some, and when the Fork (hmmm...I am still running that on my Ventana) needed warranty service the Vicious became my only mountain bike for a couple of months. This was at a time when I rode in the woods almost exclusively, five to seven rides per week. When the Fox (120mm) came back I honestly didn't like how it felt, especially climbing.

    From then, I started riding single speed, which I did again lost exclusively for maybe 5 ? years. Climbing on a single speed = standing, and I LOVE how a rigid fork feels especially on a climb.

    Would love more info on the bike.

    I don't ride so much in the woods these days, and my finicky knee keeps me leery of the single speed, but rigid mountain bikes are awesome.

    SPP
    My name is Peter Miller.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Canada eh
    Posts
    596
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Rigid 29ers

    Depends a lot on your local trails. I did the rigid SS thing a few years ago...and it's bumpy as hell here. I don't even ride my hardtail all that much (except now, during winter).

    Having said that, there's some pretty savvy folks out there who say geometry is fast, not suspension travel. (Most of those folks still don't ride rigid forks.)
     

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    W Mass
    Posts
    9,190
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)

    Default

    My last ride was an aluminum 29er with a rigid carbon fork. Of course it was great under heavy-effort climbing on fast stuff. But where I liked it best was low-speed superchunk where the precision of having the front end go just where you put it was important. And also the reliability. Today I rode with a friend who had a Lefty, just out of rebuild, that collapsed.

    My rigid fork was also nice in really tough rock gardens because you never lost pedal clearance. Predictable.

    Where it sucked was when riding in a group and they picked up the pace on flowy trails or descents. Yes you can ride that fast but the margin of error gets slim. And then you pinch flat or dent a rim. Not as big a problem if you ride alone or don't have your pace pushed.

    It's also nice sometimes to be able to stuff your wheel into something and have the fork take the edge off. There are some techy climbs where the suspension fork helps keep your rear wheel in contact.

    And now I have a Fox 34. The first fork I haven't wanted to swap for rigid. Very precise steering, and the action is so smooth and linear I'm not aware it's working until I pull the little blue lever all the way back.
    Tödd Höllând

    Give a man a fish and feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish and feed him for a lifetime. Teach a man to cycle and he will realize fishing is stupid and boring. -- Desmond Tutu

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Flagstaff, Arizona
    Posts
    9,668
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Rigid 29ers

    Yes!

    Especially ones that do not have wanky "Suspension Corrected" forks but proper length forks that ride right.


    12991129_10154262881068216_5827993964544774431_n.jpg



    - Garro.
    Steve Garro, Coconino Cycles.
    Frames & Bicycles built to measure and Custom wheels
    Hecho en Flagstaff, Arizona desde 2003
    www.coconinocycles.com
    www.coconinocycles.blogspot.com

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Chester County, PA USA
    Posts
    464
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Rigid 29ers

    Hugely in favor.
    Attached Images Attached Images
     

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Flagstaff, Arizona
    Posts
    9,668
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Rigid 29ers

    Quote Originally Posted by treadonme View Post
    Hugely in favor.
    Nice Don Bike!



    - Garro.
    Steve Garro, Coconino Cycles.
    Frames & Bicycles built to measure and Custom wheels
    Hecho en Flagstaff, Arizona desde 2003
    www.coconinocycles.com
    www.coconinocycles.blogspot.com

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    35
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Rigid 29ers

    Quote Originally Posted by steve garro View Post
    Nice Don Bike!



    - Garro.
    +1. I have always wanted a dirt drop Don bike.

    I prefer my 29ers rigid and non-suspension corrected. Currently running 3. 2 SS and 1 geared.

    Less is more with these bikes and if your trails or riding style suit them, they are a lot of fun.
     

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Barcelona
    Posts
    2,227
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Rigid 29ers

    I have this fantasy of building a lavender rigid Yo Eddy! but if the build were heavy that would defeat one of the purposes which is to have a nimble + light ride

    So the idea of a rigid carbon 29er intrigues me a lot

    I'm not a mtber but I've been jonesing pretty hard the past 3-5 years

    I was surprised none of the big three Specialized, Trek, Cannondale offer this model then again I wasn't surprised.

    I saw a rigid Ritchey 29er recently but I thought it built heavy for what it was which makes me pause on steel - not sure if Fat Chance's are 853

    Kind of cool it was a rigid Igleheart that got me thinking on this

    Who makes the best carbon rigid mtb fork?
     

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    283
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Rigid 29ers

    when i moved to Austin, I was riding a Jabberwocky with a 80mm Tower Pro. I don't know if it was the fork or the Vassago geo, but as soon as I sold the Jabber and got a Karate Monkey, I stopped crashing all the time, even with the rigid fork. however, after years of riding rigid and hardtail bikes (no FS and mostly singlespeed), I can say that I much prefer a squish fork for local terrain. just too many rocks coming too fast to be enjoyable on a rigid bike. The trail demands keeping some momentum to get through the rocks and I can't move slow enough to keep from endoing. maybe rigid with gears would work better?

    that said, I bought a rigid Salsa Cromoto Grade fork with the intension of using it for gravel grinders. then my Reba started acting up again and, since it's under warranty still, the Salsa is serving as my backup. I will ride like this for a while but I don't forsee myself riding trails for very long with with it.
    Jonathan - Austin, TX
    A Thorn in Your Sidewall

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    6,812
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Rigid 29ers

    I like going back & forth with suspended and rigid MTBs. I like the face a rigid bike hs a much nicer front/rear weight balance than an hardtail. I find the rigid and + sized tire a nice combo. The weight saved on the fork making up for the added weight in the tires, the added cushion on the tires making up for the lack of suspension.Riding rigid helps you working on your lines and it gives a much harder workout on the upper body which you can benefit when riding suspended again. I'm all for riding pretty much rigid in winter when snow limit us to lower elevation levels and thus much less technical tracks then switch to suspended for the bigger rides in the mountains.
    --
    T h o m a s

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    35
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Rigid 29ers

    I will add this.

    The fork is so important for rigid rides. Even if you cannot afford a custom bike, I do highly recommend, when possible, an appropriate non-suspension corrected steel fork built by a custom builder for your weight, terrain and riding style. Most steel stock and custom production forks need to be overbuilt to handle all sizes and conditions so unless you need a fork like that, a fork built for you will feel much better and be more forgiving.

    In fact when I got back into mountain biking a number of years ago, I had Mr. Igleheart build me a BOI for my SS 26er, which I still vey much enjoy riding.
     

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Flagstaff, AZ
    Posts
    148
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Rigid 29ers

    Especially ones that do not have wanky "Suspension Corrected" forks but proper length forks that ride right.
    Suspension correct is rigid incorrect....and suspension incorrect.

    Quote Originally Posted by sk_tle View Post
    suspended [AND] rigid MTBs.
    Not one bike that does both, but both bikes.



    Many many offroad touring miles and tours on the rigid 29er=bikeoftheapocalypse! With the right parts you only have to buy one once!

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    114
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Rigid 29ers

    had a rigid jabberwocky a few years ago and sold it to fund a new carbon HT purchase. that said, i want another one....like now.

    waiting for the new jabbers to drop and will scoop one up with a rigid steel fork.

    riding rigid definitely changed the way i rode and also helped with my CX racing as well. as a clydesdale, i tend to break and stress a lot of parts. but those years i rode rigid definitely made me try to float over more tech/rough sections rather than just sacrificing tires and wheels and taking more punishment on the body.
     

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    victoria, bc
    Posts
    1,708
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Rigid 29ers

    I think it depends where you live

    personally I prefer to ride the cx bike a little bit beyond where it should be, then have a FS trail bike to ride almost everything else on the island
     

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Middle GA
    Posts
    5,926
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Rigid 29ers

    I love my rigid SS - the two go together well IMO. My geared bike is more fun with the squish. It's nice having both, the rigid is definitely less fun when things get really rough, but for the vast majority of the riding I do it works great.
    Dustin Gaddis
    www.MiddleGaEpic.com
    Why do people feel the need to list all of their bikes in their signature?

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Barcelona
    Posts
    2,227
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Rigid 29ers

    Both of these give me wood:





    Although I would love to see a rigid carbon fork alternative - I looked at Enve's but it's heinous - I didn't see a single build where it wasn't an eyesore, something about that fork doesn't jive aesthetically like these above

    The Igleheart would be sick on a Yo Eddy, but I think the comment above may be correct that I should probably stretch my cross bike for where I live

    I don't live in big mountains and won't be riding them regularly still a rigid 29er would be a lot of fun to get out so I'm still dreaming
     

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Middle GA
    Posts
    5,926
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Rigid 29ers

    The MRP rigid fork (it was called the Rock Solid back when it was a White Brothers product) is one of the better looking options IMO, but it's not full carbon. I've got one. I've also got a Syncros fork that is full carbon (and 1-1/8" steerer!!) and it looks good too.

    MRP/White Brothers






    Syncros
    Dustin Gaddis
    www.MiddleGaEpic.com
    Why do people feel the need to list all of their bikes in their signature?

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    NoVA
    Posts
    1,041
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Rigid 29ers

    I'm building up an AL Superfly (Trek was blowing em out cheap!) with their rigid carbon fork. Haven't ridden it yet, but have ridden my SS rigid around the DC area: It brings me back to the days when I first started riding off-road. That's good 'cause I learned those skills and haven't stopped using them. It's bad 'cause I've never quite trusted the front end of my mtn bikes when there's a squishy fork on em.

    M
     

Similar Threads

  1. 29ers with drop bars
    By Scott Altland in forum Mountain Bikes
    Replies: 45
    Last Post: 12-25-2017, 05:52 PM
  2. No nonsense 1x11 HT 29ers
    By holliscx in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 40
    Last Post: 04-26-2016, 12:52 PM
  3. RC2 comes to 29ers!
    By Applesauce in forum Mountain Bikes
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 04-09-2014, 11:40 PM
  4. Stock 29ers with short chain stays?
    By nahtnoj in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 40
    Last Post: 12-20-2012, 09:09 AM
  5. 29ers for short people
    By 962 in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 09-25-2010, 07:53 PM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •