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Thread: Reliable, light, reasonably priced MTB hubs

  1. #81
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    Default Re: Reliable, light, reasonably priced MTB hubs

    Even if XTR freehubs are miraculously more reliable than XT hibs, I want better engagement.
    Jonathan - Austin, TX

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    Default Re: Reliable, light, reasonably priced MTB hubs

    XT/XTR are 36 points of engagement, which isn't terrible, but isn't class leading either.
    Dustin Gaddis
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    Default Re: Reliable, light, reasonably priced MTB hubs

    Quote Originally Posted by dgaddis View Post
    XT/XTR are 36 points of engagement, which isn't terrible, but isn't class leading either.
    Is the old xtr m950 also 36 pts?
    I came here for the socks.

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    Default Re: Reliable, light, reasonably priced MTB hubs

    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    Not convinced that XTR is reliable
    Quote Originally Posted by michäel2 View Post
    xtr is fit and forget in my experience, my mtb has xtr hubs brakes and complete drive train
    I've only been riding my XTR hubs since January, but thus far I'd say they've been a very good experience - no need to adjust at all, quick engagement (36 points), titanium freehub prevents marring, quiet operation, and very good finish. I prefer them to the DT Swiss hubs on my Giant Spline 2 wheels. I should probably repack them while my leg is broken, actually...

    Quote Originally Posted by colker View Post
    Not the way i do it> v brakes + 8 sp + 26in + rigid frame.
    It's still a lot of fun. I will never know if it's less fun than a FS that will put me in a way over my head situation since i have $ priorities. I still believe all a bike needs to do is look good, climb well and obey while descending steep stuff.
    Yes, granted. That said, the price differential between modern road bikes and modern mtbs keeps climbing. A good mid-range MTB with SLX and decent suspension is well over $3,000 US now. But they are fun fun fun!
     

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    Default Re: Reliable, light, reasonably priced MTB hubs

    A lot of this talk of quick engagement is rather overstated. I enjoy quick engagement as much as the next guy (I have a hope trials hub on one bike 3deg iirc) however my main trail bike for 10 years has run the same dtswiss with the standard/slow engagement. Hasn't made any noticeable difference... apart from being quiet and solid as a rock.

    Also, who said to stop pedaling?! :)
     

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    Default Re: Reliable, light, reasonably priced MTB hubs

    Quote Originally Posted by enieleni View Post
    A lot of this talk of quick engagement is rather overstated. I enjoy quick engagement as much as the next guy (I have a hope trials hub on one bike 3deg iirc) however my main trail bike for 10 years has run the same dtswiss with the standard/slow engagement. Hasn't made any noticeable difference... apart from being quiet and solid as a rock.

    Also, who said to stop pedaling?! :)
    I think it comes down to the type of trails you ride/your riding style. I ride a lot of trails that getting in a quick, half pedal stroke in between corners, or rocks for that matter is important, and the extra POE is noticeable, on some other trails I might not notice that much. That said, it is important to me that I get that quick stroke in, but it might not be to everyone.

    I have been having good luck with the BHS hubs, and I am pretty rough on hubs, specifically freehubs. I also love the availability of the different axle/hole counts. For instance, I've really needed a 32 hole hub, that is 11 speed (road) compatible, centerlock, and adaptable. Add in the POE aspect, and low cost, theres not much else out there.
    --------------------
    another jaunt
    REBAR

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    Default Re: Reliable, light, reasonably priced MTB hubs

    Quote Originally Posted by enieleni View Post
    A lot of this talk of quick engagement is rather overstated. I enjoy quick engagement as much as the next guy (I have a hope trials hub on one bike 3deg iirc) however my main trail bike for 10 years has run the same dtswiss with the standard/slow engagement. Hasn't made any noticeable difference... apart from being quiet and solid as a rock.

    Also, who said to stop pedaling?! :)
    Compared to how beneficial more engagement could possibly be, to the marketing surrounding the concept, seems completely out of proportion. Reliable please, and thank you.
    Hopefully Shimano can get the Xt rear hub back to being a great bang for the buck product that it was for a generation of riders. It was the top of the line once. What a drag.

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    Default Re: Reliable, light, reasonably priced MTB hubs

    Quote Originally Posted by s_curran View Post
    I think it comes down to the type of trails you ride/your riding style. I ride a lot of trails that getting in a quick, half pedal stroke in between corners, or rocks for that matter is important, and the extra POE is noticeable, on some other trails I might not notice that much. That said, it is important to me that I get that quick stroke in, but it might not be to everyone.

    This. Technical climbing where you stall, rebalance and go is more fun w/ fast engaement.
    I came here for the socks.

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    Default Re: Reliable, light, reasonably priced MTB hubs

    Fast engagement is really nice for creek crossings too, makes it a lot easier to keep your feet dry. Especially nice in the winter!
    Dustin Gaddis
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    Default Re: Reliable, light, reasonably priced MTB hubs

    Quote Originally Posted by dgaddis View Post
    Fast engagement is really nice for creek crossings too, makes it a lot easier to keep your feet dry. Especially nice in the winter!
    Say what?!
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    Default Re: Reliable, light, reasonably priced MTB hubs

    Quote Originally Posted by enieleni View Post
    Say what?!
    You don't have to pedal full circles, so depending on the depth of the creek, you can often make it across without getting your feet wet.
    Dustin Gaddis
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    Default Re: Reliable, light, reasonably priced MTB hubs

    Quote Originally Posted by enieleni View Post
    Say what?!
    If you have enough points of engagement you don't have to move your feet very far below parallel in order to get some forward motion. You can ratchet pedal. An 18 POE hub is going to translate to about 40 deg of slack you'll have to take up with your pedals before you start moving forwards. Something like a I9 Torch is going to be more like 9 deg of slack. You notice it.
     

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    Default Re: Reliable, light, reasonably priced MTB hubs

    On the topic, O have noticed that some hubs have 4 pawls while others have 3 or 6. I am under the impression that 4 pawls mean 2 pawls engage, while with 3 or 6 you can transfer torque into 3 pawls instead of 2. Is this the case? If so, why do Hope and Hadley design their hubs around 4?
    Jonathan - Austin, TX

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    Default Re: Reliable, light, reasonably priced MTB hubs

    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    On the topic, O have noticed that some hubs have 4 pawls while others have 3 or 6. I am under the impression that 4 pawls mean 2 pawls engage, while with 3 or 6 you can transfer torque into 3 pawls instead of 2. Is this the case? If so, why do Hope and Hadley design their hubs around 4?
    It all depends.

    Hope & Hadley are both 4 pawl and all engage at the same time.
    ***Except the Hope single speed/trials hubs, which have 4 pawls in two offset pairs, so two engage at a time - this doubles the engagement without making the teeth finer (and weaker) on the drive ring or pawl

    White Industries uses 3 pawls, all engage at the same time.

    Industry 9 has 6 pawls in two offset groups of three, so 3 engage at a time.

    Profile has 6 pawls in three offset pairs, so two pawls engage at a time.

    The more pawls you have engaging, the more the load is distributed over a larger area, reducing stress, wear and tear, and reducing the chance of slipping/skipping. Of course, the more pawls you have, the smaller they have to be, which could make them weaker.

    This is a White Industries freehub. 3 pawls. If you were to fit four pawls, the material supporting the pawls (the big 'wave' behind each pawl seat) would have to be reduced to make room for an additional pawl. The WI freehub is titanium, and pretty indestructible. The standard Hope freehub body is aluminum, and some heavier/stronger riders can produce enough power to eventually deform the pawl seats. Hope offers a stainless steel option that doesn't have this issue.

    Dustin Gaddis
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    Why do people feel the need to list all of their bikes in their signature?

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    Default Re: Reliable, light, reasonably priced MTB hubs

    Thank you for clarifying!
    Jonathan - Austin, TX

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    Default Re: Reliable, light, reasonably priced MTB hubs

    Quote Originally Posted by dgaddis View Post
    You don't have to pedal full circles, so depending on the depth of the creek, you can often make it across without getting your feet wet.
    I see our creeks are very different. Ours are pretty narrow and I blast through at full speed. Trailing shoe usually gets wet due to splash. :) Hadn't thought about creeks where that perfect combination of depth and width would require ratcheting.
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    Default Re: Reliable, light, reasonably priced MTB hubs

    Quote Originally Posted by enieleni View Post
    I see our creeks are very different. Ours are pretty narrow and I blast through at full speed. Trailing shoe usually gets wet due to splash. :) Hadn't thought about creeks where that perfect combination of depth and width would require ratcheting.
    Most of the ones I encounter are easy to just blast across. Some can be deep though, there's one that's near the lake, and if the lake level is high and there's been a lot of rainfall it will the lake will back up into the creek, making the crossing over knee deep. It's usually 6"-10" though.

    There's a race I do every winter in the mtns of north GA, it's 34 miles and about two miles into it you cross Dry Creek, which is about 20ft wide. It might only be 4" deep, or it might be mid-thigh level deep. And the race is the first weekend of Jan/Feb/March. One year it was stupid cold, the high that day was in the 20's (*F). I met a guy at the post-ride campfire who DNF'd because his socks froze to his shoes after he rode that creek.

    This one is on a gravel ride:


    Here's another one on a different gravel ride. In the summer you just blast it at full speed (like in the pic). In the winter, go slow and ratchet the pedals across to stay dry. It's a good half hour from where the ride usually starts, so you don't want to end up wet on a really cold day.
    Dustin Gaddis
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    Why do people feel the need to list all of their bikes in their signature?

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    Default Re: Reliable, light, reasonably priced MTB hubs

    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    Still a good topic.

    Chris King is too rich for my blood. Considering Hadley or Hope Pro 4 for a rear hub. I ride singlespeed most of the time but want a regular free hub to run 1x10 some days. I weigh about 165. Not convinced that XTR is reliable and considering those BHS Bitex hubs, but willing to pay for durability.
    For SS duties, make your list of options in your price range, with proven track records, and then go with the one with the quickest engagement.

    Quote Originally Posted by colker View Post
    I have 2 m950 rear wheels and it could be better. I killed the freewheel on the 3rd one. Other than not being bombproof engagement is sloooow... If a used king hub falls on my lap, it will be the definite upgrade.
    To be fair, your M950 stuff is nearly 20 years old now. :-)
    Bill Showers

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    Default Re: Reliable, light, reasonably priced MTB hubs

    I think it takes a little bit of time riding on a high point of engagement hub to learn how to utilize the various ways a high point of engagement can help you. I'm guessing most people who are used to Kings would not be happy to go back to Shimano or stock DT Swiss levels of engagement (I wouldn't). High point of engagement is kind of like buying the grand touring version over the sport version. Both will get you there but a high point of engagement makes the trip a lot nicer. My 0.02.
     

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    Default Re: Reliable, light, reasonably priced MTB hubs

    Same goes for rock gardens around here: you can't just keep pedalling through them. You need to squeeze every bit of momentum out of every pedalstroke that you can, especially on a SS bike, which is why I am considering paying more for more POE.
    Jonathan - Austin, TX

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