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Thread: New Kitchens / Remodels

  1. #361
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    Default Re: New Kitchens / Remodels

    What Brian says.

    If you do horizontal, there should be a calculation for the blower for length/diameter of pipe and vertical/horizontal travel. If the blower is under-powered, then you may end up with accumulation of stuff inside the pipe and/or cooking smells in each room the pipe travels through. If your installer can't answer that question, then the manufacturer of the hood should be able to.

    Installers would rather run it out the side of the house so they don't get blamed for roof leaks. So if your installer seems hesitant about running it vertically, that might be a sign to involve a roof contractor to do the hole, shingles and flashing. Or find someone else who can do the install you want.
    Jorn Ake
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  2. #362
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    Default Re: New Kitchens / Remodels

    Shortest distance, least temperature contrast if you can make it work unless with horizontal the push is such that it is in there without any time to cool off.

  3. #363
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    Default Re: New Kitchens / Remodels

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom View Post
    Shortest distance, least temperature contrast if you can make it work unless with horizontal the push is such that it is in there without any time to cool off.
    Hmm, the vertical run would go through 2-3' of unheated attic before the roof. Going horizontal would keep it heated right to the exterior wall.

  4. #364
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    Default Re: New Kitchens / Remodels

    Go for most vertical fewest corners shortest distance stablest temp. So wrap a vertical vent if it goes through unheated space.
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  5. #365
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    Default Re: New Kitchens / Remodels

    Quote Originally Posted by j44ke View Post
    Go for most vertical fewest corners shortest distance stablest temp. So wrap a vertical vent if it goes through unheated space.
    Thanks, Jorn. I think I remember @thollandpe advising something similar to another user long ago.

    I talked with the installer last night, and he said he was fine talking through it on Friday when they come to do the work.

  6. #366
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    Default Re: New Kitchens / Remodels

    @caleb, the fan has to push against the friction of the duct, and it makes no difference whether the duct is horizontal or vertical. It's just the total length plus the resistance of all the fittings added together. Size (and velocity) will have a big effect on pressure drop too. Commercial kitchen exhaust ducts used to be designed for fairly high velocity, 1500 fpm, to keep aerosols suspended. But the minimum has been dropped to 500 fpm in recent history because it results in less grease accumulation.

    It doesn't sound like either of your options is going to have a significant length or a bunch of fittings. Regardless of routing, I'd make sure they plan to use rigid duct, and not flex like below.

    The rigid duct should be straight and not have a belly in it to collect moisture. The duct in my house is horizontal, rectangular, aluminum, and has been AOK since 1978. Don't worry about going out the sidewall of the house.

    If it's running through an unconditioned space you should insulate it so it won't condense once it warms up. If it's running through a conditioned space make sure you have a backdraft damper to keep it from condensing on the outer surface when off in cold weather. They also work well to keep wrens out.

    And I'll repeat a warning. If your fan has a large exhaust air volume, like more than 400 cfm*, give some consideration as to where the makeup air will be pulled from. You don't want it supplied through your dryer vent, bathroom exhaust fan, or flue (especially for a gas-fired appliance).



    * Full-on commercial kitchen hoods for appliances like char-broilers and deep-fat fryers will be designed for 240-360 cfm per linear foot.
    Last edited by thollandpe; 8 Hours Ago at 05:12 PM.
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