User Tag List

Page 7 of 10 FirstFirst 12345678910 LastLast
Results 121 to 140 of 199

Thread: Chef Knives?

  1. #121
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    741
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Chef Knives?

    Quote Originally Posted by dgaddis View Post
    Just got my first Japanese knife, a Takamura 180mm gyuto. It's fantastic. So thin, so sharp, looking forward to seeing how the steel holds up.

    It is interesting comparing it to my 8" Wusthof Classic chef knife. The steel is half as thick on the Takamura, but is ground differently. The Wusthof has a full flat grind, so from the spine to the cutting edge it's getting thinner the whole way down. The Takamura maintains it's full thickness until about half way down to the cutting edge.

    A few years ago I did an impulse buy and got a Tojiro DP chef's knife. It was superior to my Henkels and Wustofs in every way: sharpened to a higher level, was easier to sharpen, and sliced better a month after sharpening than the Henkels and Wustofs did when freshly sharpened. I've learned that the Tojiro is considered a decent and affordable knife but by no means a great knife. Ever since I've wondered what I would buy in the $250-300 range (for a 240mm Gyuto) but there are so many choices that my eyes glaze over. How do ya choose?

  2. #122
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Casolare alla Scala
    Posts
    1,367
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Chef Knives?

    Quote Originally Posted by 9tubes View Post
    How do ya choose?
    Ideally, by bringing some carrots and daikon to your (er, my) local pusher. All the reputable Japanese makers make good blades, and most of the western makers are following suit with harder, thinner designs. It's all so good, it's more a matter of personal preference.

    The first thing for me is the handle. I found out early on that I have a *strong* preference for octagonal handles. While I was shopping for a usuba, I found out I really preferred a nakiri, even for katsuramuki. I like blades that are a little more rust resistant, as my white #1 deba seems to develop spots no matter what I do. And finally, does it look bad ass and make me want to cut shit just to enjoy using it...

    Absent of getting to handle blades it's tough. I'd pic this one personally, especially if it's going to get heavy use. In fact, it's what's in my knife block, albeit with a slightly different semi-stainless metal.

  3. #123
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Middle GA
    Posts
    7,100
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    14 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Chef Knives?

    Quote Originally Posted by 9tubes View Post
    A few years ago I did an impulse buy and got a Tojiro DP chef's knife. It was superior to my Henkels and Wustofs in every way: sharpened to a higher level, was easier to sharpen, and sliced better a month after sharpening than the Henkels and Wustofs did when freshly sharpened. I've learned that the Tojiro is considered a decent and affordable knife but by no means a great knife. Ever since I've wondered what I would buy in the $250-300 range (for a 240mm Gyuto) but there are so many choices that my eyes glaze over. How do ya choose?
    I'm not at all an expert, so, I'm not the guy to ask haha. But, with that said, here's how I ended up with the Takamura. I found the 'chefknives' subreddit and posted a question if anyone had any experience with the Warther knives. They're made in the USA, and use S35VN which is a well know used to be considered a 'super steel' in the pocket knife world. But I'll admit I don't care for the finish they put on them, and, there's very little info out there about them. So I posted the question if anyone had experience, mentioned some other knives I had (Wusthof, Mercer, Victorinox) and said I wanted a thinner grind (than the Mercers) and better edge retention. Anyhow, someone suggest I look at the Takamura instead. They're a well known and respected low(er) quantity manufacturer, and it wasn't crazy expensive at ~$165. Certainly not cheap, but not $300 either. It has a 'western' style handle, which I like (I haven't used an octogonal or other traditional Japanese style handle to be fair). Anyhow, so I tried it out, and I dig it.
    Dustin Gaddis
    www.MiddleGaEpic.com
    Why do people feel the need to list all of their bikes in their signature?

  4. #124
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    15
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Chef Knives?

    Quote Originally Posted by 9tubes View Post
    A few years ago I did an impulse buy and got a Tojiro DP chef's knife. It was superior to my Henkels and Wustofs in every way: sharpened to a higher level, was easier to sharpen, and sliced better a month after sharpening than the Henkels and Wustofs did when freshly sharpened. I've learned that the Tojiro is considered a decent and affordable knife but by no means a great knife. Ever since I've wondered what I would buy in the $250-300 range (for a 240mm Gyuto) but there are so many choices that my eyes glaze over. How do ya choose?
    The Tojiro was my first Japanese knive as well. I've since acquired many more, including a Misono UX10 270mm, which is in that budget range. In my experience the difference is that the better knives stay sharer for a longer time. The initial cut after sharpening isn't much different. Obviously fit and finish is nicer on the better knives. My other recommendation is for a Hakiri--it is such a great knife for cutting vegetables. I went the same path of getting a Tojiro then 6 months later getting something a little nicer--the only major difference is edge retention.

  5. #125
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    DC
    Posts
    26,701
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    37 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Chef Knives?

    You dog.

  6. #126
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Paint me back home in Wyoming
    Posts
    805
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Chef Knives?

    How did I miss this tread before?

    Quote Originally Posted by 9tubes View Post
    A few years ago I did an impulse buy and got a Tojiro DP chef's knife. It was superior to my Henkels and Wustofs in every way: sharpened to a higher level, was easier to sharpen, and sliced better a month after sharpening than the Henkels and Wustofs did when freshly sharpened. I've learned that the Tojiro is considered a decent and affordable knife but by no means a great knife. Ever since I've wondered what I would buy in the $250-300 range (for a 240mm Gyuto) but there are so many choices that my eyes glaze over. How do ya choose?
    It's somewhat like choosing a bike....you can do a lot of research about the little guys or you can buy something from the big brands. The big question is....carbon, stainless or stainless clad carbon?

    IMO it's hard to go wrong with something from Katsushige Anryu, either of the Kurosaki brothers (Makato and Yu) or Yoshimi Kato. You should be able to find something from one of them in your price range.

    If length is important, you should be aware that knives made in Sakai usually run shorter for the same stated length than knives from most other places in Japan. Sakai made knives measure from the tip of the blade to the machi while most others measure from the tip to the heel of the blade. For example, I have a Sakai made 240 gyuto and an Echizen made 210 gyuto; if I place the heel of both blades together the blade on the 240 is only about 12mm longer than the blade on the 210.
    Eat one live toad first thing in the morning and nothing worse will happen to you all day.

  7. #127
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    741
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Chef Knives?

    Thanks for the suggestions and advice.

    - Brian

  8. #128
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    741
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Chef Knives?

    Quote Originally Posted by choke View Post
    How did I miss this tread before?

    It's somewhat like choosing a bike....you can do a lot of research about the little guys or you can buy something from the big brands. The big question is....carbon, stainless or stainless clad carbon?
    There is so much info out there and so many brands.

    Stainless or stainless-clad carbon for me. It seems that the stainless-clad carbon has no downsides compared to all-carbon steel. From what I've read, going down the route of all stainless provides a narrower range of choices for steels and some have negatives like being more brittle, harder to sharpen, or not keeping sharp as long. Is that a correct summary?

  9. #129
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    741
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Chef Knives?

    Here's one for you knife experts. I see that knives have changed since I shopped a few years ago. I see a lot of knives with either blackened finish or hammered finish or sometimes both. It seems that a few years ago the Damascus style was popular and now things have moved on. Is there an advantage or benefit to the blackened finish or the hammered finish? Is this just fashion or are they a passing thing?

    Screen Shot 2020-10-14 at 3.41.54 PM.jpg

  10. #130
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    282
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Chef Knives?

    my chef friend always uses a hammered knife above the blade and so he can chop away safely and without barely looking. I do both as I am not so skilfull

  11. #131
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Casolare alla Scala
    Posts
    1,367
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Chef Knives?

    Quote Originally Posted by 9tubes View Post
    There is so much info out there and so many brands.

    Stainless or stainless-clad carbon for me. It seems that the stainless-clad carbon has no downsides compared to all-carbon steel. From what I've read, going down the route of all stainless provides a narrower range of choices for steels and some have negatives like being more brittle, harder to sharpen, or not keeping sharp as long. Is that a correct summary?
    There are so, so many stainless varieties out there itís impossible to generalize at this point. You can get an alloy with almost any type of performance. Iím not a great reference for the names/codes of the metals, and itís helpful to work with a dealer who does know if you have the chance.

    Stainless clad carbon can be an issue if the core is super reactive. One of my knives is like this and I need to keep an eye on it. If I cut reactive food, I need to immediately wash and wipe. Again, the options are overwhelming.

    Quote Originally Posted by 9tubes View Post
    Is there an advantage or benefit to the blackened finish or the hammered finish?
    Nope, itís about aesthetics. Many of the dark finishes wonít last through sharpening and long term use. Many of them look really, really cool tho... and if it makes your heart race then awesome. Itís fun to use cool looking stuff.

    I think those things matter more in the internet era. When you need to sell something with a couple of pictures a striking finish can definitely help. Things that matter (to me, and I think to you) are the quality and shape of the grind, the thinness of the blade, the fit of the handle including how the spine hits the hand (Iíve had some of my knives modified here), the curve of the cutting edge.

    All that said Iíve lusted after one of hinoura-sanís river jump blades for years. Even though it didnít really fit my hand...

  12. #132
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Paint me back home in Wyoming
    Posts
    805
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Chef Knives?

    Quote Originally Posted by 9tubes View Post
    There is so much info out there and so many brands.

    Stainless or stainless-clad carbon for me. It seems that the stainless-clad carbon has no downsides compared to all-carbon steel. From what I've read, going down the route of all stainless provides a narrower range of choices for steels and some have negatives like being more brittle, harder to sharpen, or not keeping sharp as long. Is that a correct summary?
    Generally speaking that's probably a good summary.....but as always nothing is set in stone.

    Quote Originally Posted by 9tubes View Post
    Here's one for you knife experts. I see that knives have changed since I shopped a few years ago. I see a lot of knives with either blackened finish or hammered finish or sometimes both. It seems that a few years ago the Damascus style was popular and now things have moved on. Is there an advantage or benefit to the blackened finish or the hammered finish? Is this just fashion or are they a passing thing?
    The black is the scale left over from forging. It is mostly for looks, though there are some people who feel that it helps with food release. As spopepro said, eventually it will wear off. The hammered finish - and others like it - are usually more orientated towards food release, though some blacksmiths also do designs to differentiate their knives from others.

    Some suggestions, if you're up for them. I have a Kurosaki (though in R2) and a Kato AS and both are nice knives IMO. I don't have any experience with the Wakui but they get a lot of praise and the price is quit nice. Only you can decide what works best for you, but you can compare thickness, shape, etc. to a knife that you like and that should give you some idea of what may work.

    https://www.chefknivestogo.com/kumegy24.html

    https://carbonknifeco.com/products/k...ji-gyuto-240mm

    https://www.epicedge.com/shopexd.asp?id=95729
    Eat one live toad first thing in the morning and nothing worse will happen to you all day.

  13. #133
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Western MA
    Posts
    3,564
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    7 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Chef Knives?

    I have a Nakiri that I use for everything. Any more suggestions would be welcome.
    Jay Dwight

  14. #134
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Casolare alla Scala
    Posts
    1,367
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Chef Knives?

    Quote Originally Posted by ides1056 View Post
    I have a Nakiri that I use for everything. Any more suggestions would be welcome.
    If you love your Nakiri and use it all the time, I think a nice partner would be a petty in 150mm or somewhere in that ballpark. Some people consider the petty to be the japanese partner to the western paring knife, but in the 150-180mm range it can be used for those purposes and much more. It's a great utility knife and would give you a fine point to work with.

    Something like this would be my suggestion, but there are many many options out there. I'd choose that because of my handle preference and I like the ginsanko stainless (ish... not as stainless as some, but very good resistance) especially for an everyday knife.

  15. #135
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Western MA
    Posts
    3,564
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    7 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Chef Knives?

    Thank you very much.
    Jay Dwight

  16. #136
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Western MA
    Posts
    3,564
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    7 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Chef Knives?

    Reading the various reviews and the like I found that certain cutting boards should be avoided, namely Bamboo, which I have used extensively with the Nakiri I own. I do have end-grain boards but would be interested to know more about this if anyone cares to elaborate.
    Jay Dwight

  17. #137
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Casolare alla Scala
    Posts
    1,367
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Chef Knives?

    Quote Originally Posted by ides1056 View Post
    Reading the various reviews and the like I found that certain cutting boards should be avoided, namely Bamboo, which I have used extensively with the Nakiri I own. I do have end-grain boards but would be interested to know more about this if anyone cares to elaborate.
    I used bamboo for a while until Mark here pointed out that the reason bamboo is bad is because it has really high silica content. It wonít wreck your knives, but itís not great.

    End grain boards are awesome, but are sometimes very large and unwieldy. If itís so big you canít give it a good scrub regularly, itís not a very good choice. Always remember that itís not clean until itís clean *and* dry.

    Soft long grain is goodóJapanese tradition is hinoki cutting boards. I really enjoy using mine. Both sides should be dampened before using.

    Mark has a preference for HDPE. Itís good, easy on knives, can go though the dishwasher, and is cheap. I donít love the way it feels, but itís a preference thing.

  18. #138
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Paint me back home in Wyoming
    Posts
    805
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Chef Knives?

    Bamboo also has nodes which are quite hard. But every cutting board is a compromise in some way.

    I have maple, cherry and bamboo boards and I don't really notice any big difference in the rate that my knives dull.

    The 'softest' board that I have is a Hasegawa wood core soft rubber. There is a noticeable difference in the way that it feels to me. I haven't had it long enough to really be able to compare the edge holding vs a wood board.

    This is an interesting read, particularly this part:
    To our surprise, the knives that seemed the sharpest by the end of the test were the ones that were used on boards made from harder woods. By contrast, knives used on boards made of softer woods were a bit duller. Senalik offered a possible explanation: Soft woods might initially be gentler on your knives, but because they are more prone to damage, they can dull a knife a bit faster as they get more beat-up over time, forcing the knife to travel over an increasingly irregular surface. This was certainly the case with the hinoki board: The knife we used on it was razor-sharp up until about 3,000 strokes, but as the board got increasingly scored and sliced up by the knife, the knife quickly began to dull.
    Eat one live toad first thing in the morning and nothing worse will happen to you all day.

  19. #139
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Casolare alla Scala
    Posts
    1,367
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Chef Knives?

    Quote Originally Posted by choke View Post
    Bamboo also has nodes which are quite hard. But every cutting board is a compromise in some way.

    I have maple, cherry and bamboo boards and I don't really notice any big difference in the rate that my knives dull.

    The 'softest' board that I have is a Hasegawa wood core soft rubber. There is a noticeable difference in the way that it feels to me. I haven't had it long enough to really be able to compare the edge holding vs a wood board.

    This is an interesting read, particularly this part:
    That makes some sense to me. But it is also true that correct knife use doesnít dig into the board. It is constant practice to move more, press less, and barely kiss the board. Especially on hinoki you can really feel the wood bite the knife if you cut into the board, which it sounds like what they are doing. Iím always hearing taka-sensei say ďno, faster and lighter. It sounds like ĎtchuushíĒ and it really does sound different the 1/100 times I get it really right.

    Of course, if youíre not hitting the board, maybe it doesnít matter at all what you use...

  20. #140
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Western MA
    Posts
    3,564
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    7 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Chef Knives?

    I decided on this:

    https://www.japanny.com/collections/...053601427529-1

    A birthday present to myself.
    Jay Dwight

Similar Threads

  1. Steak Knives
    By Bobonli in forum Cooks - Epicureans - Toque-istas
    Replies: 30
    Last Post: 10-31-2018, 05:48 PM
  2. Lets see some knives
    By AJPM44 in forum Cooks - Epicureans - Toque-istas
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 06-26-2014, 04:16 PM
  3. I make knives too
    By pkb in forum VSalon HandMade Gallery (non-cycling)
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: 12-04-2012, 11:49 PM
  4. Pickle knives are in
    By bellman in forum Cooks - Epicureans - Toque-istas
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 05-14-2012, 08:45 PM
  5. If you were going to commission a set of knives...
    By caleb in forum Cooks - Epicureans - Toque-istas
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 01-30-2009, 07:04 PM

Bookmarks

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •