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Thread: Finding a slow leak in a tubeless set up

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    Default Finding a slow leak in a tubeless set up

    So, most of what was a hassle with tubeless was user error with some new skills to learn.

    So here is my current conundrum. I have a slow leak in my back tyre. No worse than latex tubes, but just as annoying (to me).

    The puncture is subtle enough there are no damp spots on the tyre, so i canít just plug it. But it leaks air. With two days between riding, it needs pumping. That sort of regular maintenance makes my brain hurt.

    So whatís the best way to find a slow leak that wants to stay hidden. What do i need to learn here?
    Colin Mclelland

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    Default Re: Finding a slow leak in a tubeless set up

    Have you tried a basin of water and submerging while looking for bubbles. Most of these for me have turned out to be a valve core leak.
    My name is David Moeny

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    Default Re: Finding a slow leak in a tubeless set up

    Quote Originally Posted by Colinmclelland View Post
    So, most of what was a hassle with tubeless was user error with some new skills to learn.

    So here is my current conundrum. I have a slow leak in my back tyre. No worse than latex tubes, but just as annoying (to me).

    The puncture is subtle enough there are no damp spots on the tyre, so i can’t just plug it. But it leaks air. With two days between riding, it needs pumping. That sort of regular maintenance makes my brain hurt.

    So what’s the best way to find a slow leak that wants to stay hidden. What do i need to learn here?
    I had similar issues in the past. Usually on a brand new tire which in my idea was caused either by a porous tire or a tire that didn't seat perfectly to the sidewalls. What I did was the following : deflate the tire completely, remove the valve core, add a bit of sealant, use my Schwalbe Tire Booster to pop the tire again against the sidewalls as if it was the first mount, deflate back, insert the valve core, pump it to the desired pressure then ride.

    It as always been enough for me.

    If it is a worn tire and the leak occured only recently you should be able to solve it by adding a bit of sealant. If you have some large clear water pond/tank nearby you can try plunging the tire in the water and see if you spot any bubble. In that case mark the position, let the wheel dry, add som sealant, pump the tire and let it sits with the leaking spot in the lowest position possible and let it sit for 1h or 2 that way then ride to spread the rest of the sealant evenly.
    --
    T h o m a s

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    Default Re: Finding a slow leak in a tubeless set up

    Quote Originally Posted by Colinmclelland View Post
    With two days between riding, it needs pumping.
    Hmmm...I put air in my tires (set up tubeless) before every ride, and they always take a few pounds, even the next day.

    I never considered it to be a "real" leak...just a regular part of the game.

    SPP
    My name is Peter Miller.

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    Default Re: Finding a slow leak in a tubeless set up

    I'd just add a little more sealant and ride it. Sealant isn't a one and done deal. Some tires seat better, even identical model tires on identical rims, but adding a little air every few days is part of the deal.
    Weight Doper

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    Default Re: Finding a slow leak in a tubeless set up

    Orange Seal Endurance formula.

    Different & larger sized goobers


    - Garro.
    Steve Garro, Coconino Cycles.
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    Hecho en Flagstaff, Arizona desde 2003
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    Default Re: Finding a slow leak in a tubeless set up

    I find soapy water is easier than submerging the wheel.
     

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    Default Re: Finding a slow leak in a tubeless set up

    Quote Originally Posted by steve garro View Post
    Orange Seal Endurance formula.

    Different & larger sized goobers


    - Garro.
    Just bought a 32oz bottle.
    Weight Doper

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    Default Re: Finding a slow leak in a tubeless set up

    Quote Originally Posted by rec head View Post
    I find soapy water is easier than submerging the wheel.
    Yep and paint it on with a brush, no need to dunk it. The tire will blow bubbles just sitting there.
    Jorn Ake
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    Default Re: Finding a slow leak in a tubeless set up

    Quote Originally Posted by rec head View Post
    I find soapy water is easier than submerging the wheel.
    Thatís lucky. Other than the bath, iím pretty sure I donít own a basin big enough to be useful.
    I own some Orange Seal Endurance, just havenít got to it yet!

    Thanks for the tips...fate got in the way and it morphed into a proper puncture so i could see it and plug it! Iíll try the soapy water and a brush next time.

    Oh, and i find this funny. Intellectually i know the hole has to be down the bottom where the sealant is. I know that. I really do. Still, i like the repair to be up the top where i can see it and wonder why the sealant isnít doing its job! For crying out loud.
     

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    Default Re: Finding a slow leak in a tubeless set up

    - You don't need to submerge the whole wheel at once, just dip and slowly rotate. Any sink will work.

    - You can spray soapy water too.
     

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    Default Re: Finding a slow leak in a tubeless set up

    This reminds me...I have to find a medium-slow leak as well. Fast enough that it will go flat if left for 3 days, slow enough that it is not an issue for an average ride ... which is why it falls off my list of things to do sooner rather than later....

    Will have to try the soapy wanter trick.
    Brian McLaughlin

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    Default Re: Finding a slow leak in a tubeless set up

    Also check the valve core to make sure it’s in correctly

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    Default Re: Finding a slow leak in a tubeless set up

    you don't even have to spray suds--a sponge or rag with a really soapy mix does fine too (as in don't use too much water) I bet bubble bath soap would be great for this. slow leak could be valve, or rim tape or bead not quite seated with a bugger in the way
     

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    Default Re: Finding a slow leak in a tubeless set up

    Quote Originally Posted by Marin View Post
    - You don't need to submerge the whole wheel at once, just dip and slowly rotate. Any sink will work
    Not in our house it wonít. That would definitely be a sackable offence. Not to mention that our sink is small enough that you would pretty much have to fill it. Much prefer the wipe on watery soap idea.

    Also, Iíve got no problem pumping up tyres before a ride, but doing so at 5:20am is not part of the stealthy exit plan encouraged chez nous
     

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