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Thread: Rescuing a Ridgeback.

  1. #1
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    Default Rescuing a Ridgeback.

    I get it, they wanna make sure that the dog goes to a good home but . . . . SHEEEESH!

    1. 3-4 page application w/references.

    2. Called and spoke to all of my references for 15-20 minutes each.

    3. 90 minute phone interview. Seriously asked what we plan on feeding the dog. "Well, we feed our other dog dog-food."

    4. House visit. Except the lady doesn't respond to emails in a timely fashion (4 day delay, 1.5 sentence response) and has consistently ignored any email that comes from my GF regarding times we're available.


    All this has taken 2.5 months and we're still trying to get that house visit taken care of.



    In the meantime:

    I could've rescued a bazillion dogs from shelters just by showing up and dropping $200-$400.
    In California I could've bought 6 guns by now.
    Fuck it, I could've started driving for Uber and saved up $3000 to buy one from a breeder.
    elysian
    Tom Tolhurst

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    Default Re: Rescuing a Ridgeback.

    I worked in a humane shelter for nearly 3 years. Very rewarding work, I'd do it again if I could go back and do it again, but I was also a total wreck at the end of it.

    Go to a humane shelter, find a silly dog with his (or her) tongue hanging out sideways who looks like he (or she) is just happy to be, well he's not sure what he is but he's happy about it nonetheless and is that a ball in your hand, and give him a spin. If his/her personality works for you, go for it.

    I understand the need to save particular breeds from bad situations in which the owners were not prepared for the upkeep or the personality or whatever specific to that breed, but give me a floppy eared black and tan Chihuahua Bassett Great Dane Sheepdog Doberman Labrador Labrador Labrador Beagle Albatross Pelican Giraffe mix any day.

    Plus you'll make a humane shelter worker's day just a bit more tolerable. Trust me on this.
    Jorn Ake
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    Default Re: Rescuing a Ridgeback.

    At least when I lived there, SLC had a big dog fighting problem, and it was a similar process to try to adopt anything in the medium plus size.

    My wife and I drove out to a farm country pound (not shelter), found an insane black labweiler that was one day away from a death sentence and asked what it took to adopt. They put him on a string and asked for $15 that they said they would refund if we got him fixed.

    That space cadet is now 12 and currently snoring in the living room.

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    Default Re: Rescuing a Ridgeback.

    Quote Originally Posted by false_aesthetic View Post
    I get it, they wanna make sure that the dog goes to a good home but . . . . SHEEEESH!

    1. 3-4 page application w/references.

    2. Called and spoke to all of my references for 15-20 minutes each.

    3. 90 minute phone interview. Seriously asked what we plan on feeding the dog. "Well, we feed our other dog dog-food."

    4. House visit. Except the lady doesn't respond to emails in a timely fashion (4 day delay, 1.5 sentence response) and has consistently ignored any email that comes from my GF regarding times we're available.


    All this has taken 2.5 months and we're still trying to get that house visit taken care of.



    In the meantime:

    I could've rescued a bazillion dogs from shelters just by showing up and dropping $200-$400.
    In California I could've bought 6 guns by now.
    Fuck it, I could've started driving for Uber and saved up $3000 to buy one from a breeder.


    Actually, on the application and interview/visit, you're willingness to put up with the process and not lose interest is probably the best indicator of your suitability as a home.

    Ironic but true
     

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Rescuing a Ridgeback.

    Quote Originally Posted by j44ke View Post
    Go to a humane shelter, find a silly dog with his (or her) tongue hanging out sideways who looks like he (or she) is just happy to be, well he's not sure what he is but he's happy about it nonetheless and is that a ball in your hand, and give him a spin. If his/her personality works for you, go for it.
    Yep! Our #1 is a rescue. I thought I would hate him -- he was 4lbs of terrified chihuahua/papillon mix and grew to be 8.5lbs still terrified - but I flippin' love that little dude!

    A ridgeback is just something that I've wanted since I was 16 and am OK with holding out for one unless something some other pup presents itself and we fall in love.
    ----

    Re: dog fighting. I'm sure LA has a problem too. It's strange though, I can go and pick-up a pitbull or rottweiler puppy for next to nothing. Heck, my shop-mate got his massive pit/mastiff, Auto, for free.

    ----

    I get the feeling Vertical_doug is correct. Most other folks would have dropped out by now.
    elysian
    Tom Tolhurst

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    Default Re: Rescuing a Ridgeback.

    I've got a retired navy friend that raises ridgebacks with championship pedigrees. Each litter, about one every two years, has a few non-ridged ridgebacks and as soon as I have a place, I'll get one of the non-ridged since the show dog people don't want them. I hate the whole concept of pure breeds, every great dog I've had has been a mutt.
    I heart burnt bikes.

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    Default Re: Rescuing a Ridgeback.

    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Estlund View Post
    At least when I lived there, SLC had a big dog fighting problem, and it was a similar process to try to adopt anything in the medium plus size.

    My wife and I drove out to a farm country pound (not shelter), found an insane black labweiler that was one day away from a death sentence and asked what it took to adopt. They put him on a string and asked for $15 that they said they would refund if we got him fixed.

    That space cadet is now 12 and currently snoring in the living room.
    Great story. Thanks for taking in that space cadet; I'm sure he shows his appreciation.

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    Default Re: Rescuing a Ridgeback.

    Prior to getting our Nugget (a few weeks ago, pic attached) I was denied another pup from a...boutique adaption/ foster facility. Boutique is the only word I can think of. Same type of deal...excessive application, phone interview, etc etc before I could even see the dog. That kind of pissed me off.

    But in the end, I got Nugget from Texas Humane Heroes rather than the other pup I applied for. I feel as though I still won.

    2CB26B1E-09CD-4111-893D-F838043B3C92.jpg
    -Dustin

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    Default Re: Rescuing a Ridgeback.

    Quote Originally Posted by dashDustin View Post
    Prior to getting our Nugget (a few weeks ago, pic attached) I was denied another pup from a...boutique adaption/ foster facility. Boutique is the only word I can think of. Same type of deal...excessive application, phone interview, etc etc before I could even see the dog. That kind of pissed me off.

    But in the end, I got Nugget from Texas Humane Heroes rather than the other pup I applied for. I feel as though I still won.

    2CB26B1E-09CD-4111-893D-F838043B3C92.jpg
    You definitely won.
    More importantly, so did Nugget.

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    Default Re: Rescuing a Ridgeback.

    I bought my second RR from a great breeder in AL. PM me for info if you want his name. They are goofy dogs not for everyone, mine is pretty good now almost 2 yo and has a decent temperament. Not quite as protective as I would like, however she has increased her barking at the door. My old one used to bark when they turned in the driveway, 1/4 mile away. Ridgebacks are kinda like "whatever" dogs. They love to run, great mtb dogs. Tough to really train well sometimes because they are hunters, at least that's my experience raising them on a farm. They need a lot of exercise or they will find a way to amuse themselves, ultimately at your expense. The price was nowhere near what the LA market must ask/bring.
     

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Rescuing a Ridgeback.

    Quote Originally Posted by bigbill View Post
    I've got a retired navy friend that raises ridgebacks with championship pedigrees. Each litter, about one every two years, has a few non-ridged ridgebacks and as soon as I have a place, I'll get one of the non-ridged since the show dog people don't want them. I hate the whole concept of pure breeds, every great dog I've had has been a mutt.
    I would take a non-ridge any day!
    elysian
    Tom Tolhurst

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    Default Re: Rescuing a Ridgeback.

    Quote Originally Posted by false_aesthetic View Post
    I would take a non-ridge any day!
    Still great dogs, just not show dogs. And I'd never want a show dog, but my friend gets his bred every couple of years and the puppies are all spoken for within days of birth. His dog has a great temperament and grew up around kids. And was still a grand champion.
    I heart burnt bikes.

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    Default Re: Rescuing a Ridgeback.

    Our 3 cats all came from shelters, we picked the ones they'd had the longest, 1 was an hour away from being euthenized. They have some issues but we're very fond of them, very glad to have them in our lives. Personally, I think breeders should be banned entirely. Millions of animals die every year due to not finding homes, it's a national disgrace.
     

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    Default Re: Rescuing a Ridgeback.

    Our lives are now dominated by an aggregate 13 pounds of cat. We went to the shelter and I fell in the thrall of a seven year old deaf white cat. We figured that nobody would adopt an older deaf cat despite the fact she has an unearthly beauty about her. We knew we needed two, so we adopted a 12 month old black female too. She had just barely lived though the operation to deliver a stillborn litter. We now live in one long Spy vs Spy panel strip.
     

  15. #15
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    Default Re: Rescuing a Ridgeback.

    Quote Originally Posted by bigbill View Post
    Still great dogs, just not show dogs. And I'd never want a show dog, but my friend gets his bred every couple of years and the puppies are all spoken for within days of birth. His dog has a great temperament and grew up around kids. And was still a grand champion.
    I hear you. But many dogs that show are also excellent at what they are meant to do. We have two standard (not the mini) dachshunds that come from show lines (our older one's littermate won best hound at Westminster) and they both come from long lines of blood-tracking dachshunds often used in the field (yes, believe it or not, dachshunds are REALLY good at this); litters are spoken for immediately, usually by hunters, upon the announcement that the bitch is pregnant.

    Other show breeds have become a disgrace. IMO (show) Labradors. Your average show lab now is 20 pounds too big, looks like a Rottie, will have 100% hip dysplagia by the time they are three, and wouldn't retrieve a duck in a pond if its life depended on it.

    Responsible breeders - the good ones, the real ones - will always have their litters spoken for immediately by good folks. The backyard types.... not so much. They're a friggin' disgrace.
     

  16. #16
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    Default Re: Rescuing a Ridgeback.

    Well, the house visit was what we expected.

    Our downstairs neighbor (65-70lb rescued dog with trust issues but not a mean bone in his body) barked at her and she decided that it was aggressive.

    Two fun moments:
    1. We have a 5' section of 4' tall fence
    "That will be how the dog escapes."
    "I've had a few larger dogs in the past and decided that you never keep them in a yard unattended. Especially in LA."
    "It doesn't matter. The dog will escape."

    2. "What will you do when the Ridgeback gets into a fight with your neighbors dog?"
    "Excuse me?"
    "The dog downstairs is aggressive. What will you do when they get into a fight?"
    "Ollie definitely isn't aggressive. She hangs out with 2 little girls - under 10- and has absolutely no issue with Boo (our 8lb dog)."
    "Ok, so if the Ridgeback gets into a fight with another dog, what will you do?"


    WTF am I adopting a 16 year old punk-as-fuck dude?
    elysian
    Tom Tolhurst

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    Default Re: Rescuing a Ridgeback.

    Quote Originally Posted by false_aesthetic View Post
    "Ok, so if the Ridgeback gets into a fight with another dog, what will you do?"
    It is at this point that the a$$ in me would emerge and I would say, with a perfectly straight face, "Umm.... place a bet?"
     

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    Default Re: Rescuing a Ridgeback.

    Quote Originally Posted by dashDustin View Post
    I was denied another pup from a...boutique adaption/ foster facility.
    was it APA ?

    your pup is super cute!!
     

  19. #19
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    Default Re: Rescuing a Ridgeback.

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom View Post
    Our lives are now dominated by an aggregate 13 pounds of cat. We went to the shelter and I fell in the thrall of a seven year old deaf white cat. We figured that nobody would adopt an older deaf cat despite the fact she has an unearthly beauty about her. We knew we needed two, so we adopted a 12 month old black female too. She had just barely lived though the operation to deliver a stillborn litter. We now live in one long Spy vs Spy panel strip.
    Married into two cats, siblings with polydactyl (six toes) features. Completely different personalities but likeable enough. While stationed in Hawaii, someone found an orange tabby that they thought was ours. Our cats would hang out in the back yard but an 8 foot smooth surface fence kept them in. The cat was probably 6 months or so old so had her fixed and rehomed with some friends. That failed about 4 months later and we got her back. Oh well, three cats now. Then we moved to the PNW and within 6 months lost the two older cats (they were 14) so all we had was the Hawaii cat (Ginger). Wife had a great idea to get a kitten for her so she'd have a playmate. She found a kitten at the humane society shelter and brought her home. We named her Maryanne, obviously. Well, Ginger was a dominate female but we didn't know that until the kitten was around, but the kitten stood her ground. Now the kitten is 10 and Ginger is 13, they don't like each other but tolerate each other's existence.
    I heart burnt bikes.

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    Default Re: Rescuing a Ridgeback.

    I sleep with a barn cat who became an indoor cat after an injury, and dog number four who was the result of a trip to a shelter to pick up a parrot. Dog number five is a Cuban breed found in a NYC shelter that found it in the street. He's pocket size, so my wife takes him back and forth to the city with her.

    Of the seven horses, one, 38 years old, was a gift.

    Of the fourteen cows...

    you get the picture

    good thing we have land, lots of land, and the starry skies above
     

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