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Thread: replacing an old high end receiver

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    Default replacing an old high end receiver

    I'm not much into the new technology but do have an old turntable, cd player that i power with high quality speakers. i did have a vintage nakamichi receiver which is going. What is around that gets high marks, I still listen to a few f.m. stations and don't have much need for blue tooth. A friend recommended outlaw( Audiophile appeal: The Outlaw Audio RR 216 stereo receiver - CNET) anything else good? -Mike G

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    Default Re: replacing an old high end receiver

    You have tried this guy for your Nakamichi? Electronics Service labs
    Jeff Hazeltine

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    Default Re: replacing an old high end receiver

    Something to consider. Thanks!

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    Default Re: replacing an old high end receiver

    Naim makes
    Excellent receivers. I own one.

    If you want something cool...

    Leben CS3 integrated amplifier | Stereophile.com

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    Default Re: replacing an old high end receiver

    Quote Originally Posted by joosttx View Post
    I listened to that amp at a hifi shop in Montreal last summer, set up with some really efficient Devore speakers and a killer Brinkmann turntable. wowza.

    -g
    EPOst hoc ergo propter hoc

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    Default Re: replacing an old high end receiver

    Quote Originally Posted by GrantM View Post
    I listened to that amp at a hifi shop in Montreal last summer, set up with some really efficient Devore speakers and a killer Brinkmann turntable. wowza.

    -g
    I heard with those small devores (gibbons?). Heaven

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    Default Re: replacing an old high end receiver

    Quote Originally Posted by classtimesailer View Post
    You have tried this guy for your Nakamichi? Electronics Service labs
    I've always wanted to try ESL, but they don't have late or weekend hours.

    Also in Connecticut, I recommend Stereo Surgeons. I've had several items repaired. Interesting guy to talk to, performs thorough work.

    If you're looking to replace your receiver, I suggest you consider a separate amp and tuner. Not for the snob appeal, but for flexibility-you can upgrade wattage and amp features as necessary, and outboard tuners usually have better performance and shielding. Don't forget Craigslist and eBay, either. There's always something attractive for sale.

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    Default Re: replacing an old high end receiver

    my pockets aren't deep enough to have sampled much of this stuff (but I'm lucky enough to have some old mcintosh stuff), but op is on paper looking at an integrated tuner/preamp/amp, and the one recommended to him by a friend retails under $1000. There are no doubt quite a few of these available at the big box/home theater outlets, all with limitations obviously. So I would ask the following:
    how much power do your speakers like/need?
    how many speakers to be driven (2, 7?)
    is there a subwoofer involved?
    how good of an FM section/tuner do you want need?
    same for the turntable/phono section?

    if you don't need bells and whistles of bluetooth and home theater junk, it might be worth repairing or finding something vintage, built when phono sections and fm tuners were not just an afterthought. or consider separates, but space and budget then come into play. good luck

    maybe this one should be moved over to OT?

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    Default Re: replacing an old high end receiver

    OP - given your location repair should be pretty easy. Otherwise for something modern Outlaw and maybe Emotiva(?). I think both of those brands go for high quality at less than crazy audiophile hype prices. That said I think most modern receivers are going to give pretty clean sound. They may not have that certain something vsaloners look for in bikes and audio etc. but they aren't that bad. It's too bad Monoprice hasn't introduced a receiver. Their Monolith series is supposed to be a great value:performance. I keep waiting for their 7 channel amp to go on sale.

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    Default Re: replacing an old high end receiver

    I like the H/K two channel receivers as they are priced around $300-400 and include a phono section for those included toward vinyl.

    Picked up a 3470 several years ago and paired it with some old Mission 770F speakers and my original Adcom 575 CD player. Not our main system but sounds decent.

    The current units appear to have appropriate digital connectivity options and carry the unit numbers 3700 and 3770.

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    Default Re: replacing an old high end receiver

    Went down this road a decade ago, when my old Yamaha died. Shopped all over and sat in a bunch of listening rooms, bringing my own Beethoven and Leo Kottke to create at least one constant in the testing. I eventually gave up--there were too many variable to making a meaningful comparison. In the end I landed on a McIntosh 6400 integrated amp, which had a warmth that was close to my dad's old tube Heathkit monster amp. When it warms up, the 6400 is nicely warm. It doesn't fill out until you get up there in volume.

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    Default Re: replacing an old high end receiver

    Decided to update this post. Despite not liking the aesthetics(non-black) I went with outlaw audio. It' fairly decent. Thought the old Nakamichi had warmer sound but in general its a clean unit and I appreciate the HD radio. It has an Eq feature which honestly I can't perceive regardless of setting. Been listening to a lot of WBGO -Mike G

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    Default Re: replacing an old high end receiver

    Around five years ago I picked up an Onkyo TX-NR626 that is "good enough" to give me movie-watching sound and listening to records sound. It excels at neither but if someone just wants to check the box at a reasonable price, it's a decent place to land (or whatever the newer model is).
    Dan in Oregon

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    The wheel is round. The hill lasts as long as it lasts. That's a fact. Everything else is pure theory.

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    Default Re: replacing an old high end receiver

    This thead makes me realize I keep stuff way too long. My Thiels are from 2002, My CD player not much newer and I still have a working turntable from the 1980's

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    Default Re: replacing an old high end receiver

    Quote Originally Posted by fastupslowdown View Post
    This thead makes me realize I keep stuff way too long. My Thiels are from 2002, My CD player not much newer and I still have a woring turntable from the 1980's
    That sounds about right actually....and is probably where most here are, except for those who have the means to enjoy audiophile equipment AND fancy bikes.. I can only afford one or the other, and am much more interested in Super Record than marginal gains when spinning records.
    Dan in Oregon

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    Default Re: replacing an old high end receiver

    Quote Originally Posted by Clean39T View Post
    Around five years ago I picked up an Onkyo TX-NR626 that is "good enough" to give me movie-watching sound and listening to records sound. It excels at neither but if someone just wants to check the box at a reasonable price, it's a decent place to land (or whatever the newer model is).
    I have one of these as well, and "good enough" is an apt descriptor. As in, my needs can be met with good enough. Currently in the basement where it channels the local NPR station while I fiddle with bikes, occasionally plays some Spotify.

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    Default Re: replacing an old high end receiver

    Quote Originally Posted by fastupslowdown View Post
    This thead makes me realize I keep stuff way too long. My Thiels are from 2002, My CD player not much newer and I still have a working turntable from the 1980's
    My Thiels are a lot older than yours - 1990!

    You do, however, make a really good point. Over the last few years I've replaced my ancient pre-amp and power amp. My Audible Illusions Modulus was from 1987 and provided me over thirty years of excellent music. My Forte 1A arrive in 1990 (just after my Thiels!) Both of them were failing, slowly, as capacitors started leaking, volume pots started crackling, and finally as upper midrange music turned to fuzz.

    So now I've got a Rogue RP-1 pre-amp and Schiit Aegir power amp. And goddamn. They are $2,500 worth of wonderful.

    This new stuff is excellent. Next I turned to replacing my (1992) Enlightened Audio Designs DSP-7000 DAC. I had Schiit send me their entry high-end Bifrost 2. And it was... really good. But not as good as my ancient EAD. So back it went. I may still try their Yggdrasil. And I may also shop around for new speakers once I can leave the house.

    But in the meantime my modern/antique HiFi sounds so damn good. Whether I'm listening to Fetch the Bolt Cutters or Blue Train.

    So check out new equipment for sure. But don't be so sure it'll make you want to replace your old stuff. Good luck and have fun!
    GO!

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    Default Re: replacing an old high end receiver

    I would want a device that has modern digital signal processing. The basic ones can do frequency correction to make the response flat, such as Audyssey (used by Marantz or Denon) or MCACC (Pioneer) or YPAO (Yamaha). There's no point in having great speakers or a great amp if the room is out of whack. Let's face it, all rooms have far less than flat frequency response. The better units can do impulse control (cancellation of room reflections) like the software from Dirac Labs (used by NAD, Emotiva or ARCAM). The difference between having well-engineered DSP and not having it is far bigger than the difference between X amp and Y amp. As a result, once you get past about the $1000 price point having proper modern software is a must. If I had to choose between a $1500 NAD and some $3000 amp with no DSP, I'll bet my paycheck that the NAD would win a blind listening comparison.

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    Default Re: replacing an old high end receiver

    Quote Originally Posted by davids View Post
    ... Both of them were failing, slowly, as capacitors started leaking, volume pots started crackling, and finally as upper midrange music turned to fuzz.
    Really, the only reason to suspect "old" gear. Caps fail, components drift, and repair is sometimes difficult, if not impossible. Otherwise... I'm not sure there's any reason not to still run your WE 92A amp into 757a speakers unless you're looking for something in particular.

    Quote Originally Posted by 9tubes View Post
    I would want a device that has modern digital signal processing. The basic ones can do frequency correction to make the response flat, such as Audyssey (used by Marantz or Denon) or MCACC (Pioneer) or YPAO (Yamaha). There's no point in having great speakers or a great amp if the room is out of whack. Let's face it, all rooms have far less than flat frequency response. The better units can do impulse control (cancellation of room reflections) like the software from Dirac Labs (used by NAD, Emotiva or ARCAM). The difference between having well-engineered DSP and not having it is far bigger than the difference between X amp and Y amp. As a result, once you get past about the $1000 price point having proper modern software is a must. If I had to choose between a $1500 NAD and some $3000 amp with no DSP, I'll bet my paycheck that the NAD would win a blind listening comparison.
    Integrating DSP if you're going to go that route is smart. I can't get down with the repeated DAC->ADC->DAC->ADC->DAC that happens with some setups regardless of the advantages of correcting for room/driver/cabinet effects. However, all these amps seemingly now being "class-D" is... suboptimal.

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    Default Re: replacing an old high end receiver

    Quote Originally Posted by davids View Post
    My Thiels are a lot older than yours - 1990!

    You do, however, make a really good point. Over the last few years I've replaced my ancient pre-amp and power amp. My Audible Illusions Modulus was from 1987 and provided me over thirty years of excellent music. My Forte 1A arrive in 1990 (just after my Thiels!) Both of them were failing, slowly, as capacitors started leaking, volume pots started crackling, and finally as upper midrange music turned to fuzz.

    So now I've got a Rogue RP-1 pre-amp and Schiit Aegir power amp. And goddamn. They are $2,500 worth of wonderful.

    This new stuff is excellent. Next I turned to replacing my (1992) Enlightened Audio Designs DSP-7000 DAC. I had Schiit send me their entry high-end Bifrost 2. And it was... really good. But not as good as my ancient EAD. So back it went. I may still try their Yggdrasil. And I may also shop around for new speakers once I can leave the house.

    But in the meantime my modern/antique HiFi sounds so damn good. Whether I'm listening to Fetch the Bolt Cutters or Blue Train.

    So check out new equipment for sure. But don't be so sure it'll make you want to replace your old stuff. Good luck and have fun!
    what keeps me from going bonkers is that i'm in a 1000+ square foot apartment. Bigger and better speakers require more generous spacing requirement to sound optimal and the threat of angry neighbors limits the amount of bass and volume, and then there is the space a pre-amp, separate tuner etc would require. I'd never realize the benefits of upgrading much beyond where I am.

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