User Tag List

Results 1 to 18 of 18

Thread: Good Outdoor Wood Finish.

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    NE Ohio
    Posts
    548
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Good Outdoor Wood Finish.

    I am going to start on two outdoor wooden benches. They are going to have a clear finish. Matte or semi-gloss. Does anyone here have suggestions as to what would work best for this. Any help is appreciated.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Ottawa
    Posts
    1,022
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Good Outdoor Wood Finish.

    Teak oil is standard if you don't want a built up surface.
    Jonathan Lee
    My science page

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    997
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Good Outdoor Wood Finish.

    Need to know type of wood and whether this is year-round exposure.

    One of the important purposes of pigments in wood finishes is to protect the wood from weather and sun. There's a reason why we don't just cover all houses in clear-coat. Is pigment an option? If not, your choice of wood is vital with any clear finish and certainly determines which finish will survive best.
    Lane DeCamp

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    W Mass
    Posts
    10,185
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Good Outdoor Wood Finish.

    What's your goal here?

    Weather resistance uber alles, toxicity and environment be damned?

    Or are you looking for something that's not going to kill you or those around you in order for your bench to have a long life?

    If the latter, look into Vermont Natural Coatings - Exterior Products

    It's amazing stuff. Unfortunately my experience is only near-term, nothing out there for a decade, yet. But it does go on nice and sets up hard. And zero toxics -- no way? Whey.

    PS Their "Penetrating Waterproofer Infused with Juniper" pairs nicely with a gimlet, especially when made with Berkshire Distillers Greylock Gin.
    Last edited by thollandpe; 12-19-2018 at 11:10 PM.
    Tee Aitch

    Give a man a fish and feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish and feed him for a lifetime. Teach a man to cycle and he will realize fishing is stupid and boring. -- Desmond Tutu

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    NE Ohio
    Posts
    548
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Good Outdoor Wood Finish.

    Quote Originally Posted by thollandpe View Post
    What's your goal here?

    Weather resistance uber alles, toxicity and environment be damned?

    PS Their "Penetrating Waterproofer Infused with Juniper" pairs nicely with a gimlet, especially when made with Berkshire Distillers Greylock Gin.

    Thanks for the replies. Most likely they will be out in the elements year round. I have two large pieces of Curly Maple and a large slab of Cacao. I am not worried about color bleeding or fading.
    The Cacao seems pretty oily, But prone to splitting. These will be more whimsical than straight out traditional in style as the will go in very crazy garden setting. I will definitely look into all the suggestions
    given here.

    PS Concerning the gin, would you suggest a sprig of something or maybe over ice?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Western MA
    Posts
    2,326
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Good Outdoor Wood Finish.

    Sutherland Welles Tung Oil finish from Garrett Wade is the best I have used. Spar varnish on the snow shoes, and citrus solvent based on the floor I made, back in the day.
    Attached Images Attached Images
     

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Fort Wayne, IN
    Posts
    83
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Good Outdoor Wood Finish.

    I'm going to mention something really weird, but I've used several different brands of wood finishes for wood that was outside and after much experimenting and all of it failing to last I found out something really weird...wood finish made for boat and dock use! Not sure if this is the best but it was recommended to me by someone who has a wood deck boat and said it would last a long time on a house deck, and that was Defy Marine Seal stain (this product has a very limited number of colors, I think it was 3 or 4) and the follow up with Detco Crystal clear varnish which is a simple one part varnish. There is no holy grail of varnishes, they all have to be redone, it's just that some need to be redone sometimes as often as every 4 months, and others will last a year, the Detco stuff I put on my deck 3 years ago and it still looks good and should last at least till the end of next summer and maybe longer, but this is so far three times as long as I have gotten out of the longest lasting regular deck varnish I bought at the home improvement places, and keep in mind that the stain will last longer if you keep the varnish up to par. Of course using a new brand of stain will require you take off the old stain for the best results which is a lot of work but the end result is worth it, and of course these products are not cheap, but the durability I'm getting seems to make it worth it. I think from what my friend said that those products used on boats and docks has to be reapplied every year, but for a house deck that is dramatically increased and that is the case. If the cost is little off putting for some of you the only stain I found at a home improvement place that held up the best from those type of places is the Cetol SRD Exterior Wood Finish, it lasted a full year, it is a lot less money than the boat stuff I mentioned, but for me doing a lot less work is more important. So it will boil down to what's important for you, the initial cost vs amount of work over time.

    The other issue with using varnish on a house deck is that if it gets even a slight amount of ice or rain on it it will be extremely slippery in my experience, so if that is a problem perhaps skip the varnish unless you use a non slip varnish which doesn't work with ice of course.

    We use to own a classic vintage home with a lot of natural wood throughout, and all we ever did was once every 3 to 4 months go over it with dark furniture Old English oil! All of the wood in our house was on the darker spectrum so we used the dark instead of the lighter one. We had that house for 10 years, the previous owner did the same thing and they had it for 15 years, and the wood was looking really nice with a natural patina yet still retained a lot of gloss when we sold the house. Using Old English probably sounds weird to a lot of you but it worked for us, it was sort of a lot work taking about a day with a lot of breaks, usually my wife did our furniture and I did the house wood.

    PLEASE READ: Please keep in mind that I AM NOT a professional, just a DIY person, maybe my methods of doing something are wrong, I don't know, but just relating my experience, and my friend with the boat and dock was not a professional either just another DIY person like me. I do know that the staff at home improvement places weren't much help either, I had to do a lot of trial and error stuff due to their advice! So I thought a disclaimer was in order! LOL!!!
     

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    4,687
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Good Outdoor Wood Finish.

    I have used Minwax Helmsman to coat doors on my desert place. It lasts about 5 years between coats.
    PC250021 (1).jpg
    PC250004 (1).jpg

    -Joe

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Willy, VIC
    Posts
    1,640
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Good Outdoor Wood Finish.


    Shoot

    IMO there are two routes here: one is a plastic finish on the surface of the wood, the other is an oil finish which incorporates into the top layer of the wood.

    In the first case marine grade 2k polyurethane is the best bet, just be bloody careful applying it, the stuff is really noxious.

    In the second case there is nothing that matches pure tung oil, with the following caveats:

    If the package doesn't say it's pure tung oil it isn't; it's been cut with other things to make it easier to use but it will not be as effective.

    If it is pure tung oil it takes a bit of patience and understanding to apply it well but the results obtained will be worth it. Like many things the harder you work at this the better the result you'll get: it takes me the better part of a week to do the tung oil finish on one bike frame, you can cut that to a couple of days if you are prepared to accept slightly lesser (but still better than anything else) performance.

    I'm not going to bother with the full description of how I apply it unless you indicate that you are interested.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Western MA
    Posts
    2,326
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Good Outdoor Wood Finish.

     

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Willy, VIC
    Posts
    1,640
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Good Outdoor Wood Finish.

    I personally disagree, I prefer tung oil that hasn't been preemptively partially polymerised as I can then control the whole process myself.

    The pre-polymerised stuff is, however, easier to use and is a good start if you haven't used pure tung oil before.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    2,015
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Good Outdoor Wood Finish.

    I have nothing to add to the conversation at hand other than to say that @Diablo de Acero knows his way around indoor wood.
    Did you guys checkout his Instagram and Flickr feeds?
    WOW!!!
    Beautiful work!
    Brian McLaughlin

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Kingman, AZ
    Posts
    4,075
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Good Outdoor Wood Finish.

    I have to second the Minwax Polyurethane Stain. I love a natural finish with tung oil, but for wood that is prone to cracking and will be outside, keep it sealed. Moisture in the cracks that freezes and thaws will exacerbate the cracking. I'm a Chief Engineer at cabinet factory and familiar with finishes, but not outside stuff other than the outdoor furniture I have which has Minwax. One thing about applying any kind of stain or polyurethane finish, you want the wood to be warm so it'll accept the stain. Cold wood is no Bueno.
    Weight Doper

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    NE Ohio
    Posts
    548
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Good Outdoor Wood Finish.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bewheels View Post
    I have nothing to add to the conversation at hand other than to say that @Diablo de Acero knows his way around indoor wood.
    Did you guys checkout his Instagram and Flickr feeds?
    WOW!!!
    Beautiful work!
    Thank you very much for the kind words Brian! Making piles of sawdust and wood scraps is what I am really best at.

    Quote Originally Posted by bigbill View Post
    I have to second the Minwax Polyurethane Stain. I love a natural finish with tung oil, but for wood that is prone to cracking and will be outside, keep it sealed. Moisture in the cracks that freezes and thaws will exacerbate the cracking. I'm a Chief Engineer at cabinet factory and familiar with finishes, but not outside stuff other than the outdoor furniture I have which has Minwax. One thing about applying any kind of stain or polyurethane finish, you want the wood to be warm so it'll accept the stain. Cold wood is no Bueno.
    Thanks Big Bill. My shop gets quite chilly. I will find a nice warm place to do the finishing! What you say makes perfect sense to me.

    Thanks everyone for the replies. I really appreciate and can use the advice. I will try a couple methods of finishing mentioned here since the woods I am using are so different.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    696
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Good Outdoor Wood Finish.

    Over the years I learned to dislike anything Minwax related. For us, Helmsman lasted two years max.....plenty of am-noon sun. Minwax stain was a waste of time. Like weak tea.

    General Finishes has quality stains (wood working pros recommended).....excellent for 2 indoor projects we did.

    Two contractors we used in Maryland independently swore that Sikkens was the best outdoor wood finish. We sold the house 3 years after the first application and it was just fine.....no idea how it looks now.
     

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Ottawa
    Posts
    1,022
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Good Outdoor Wood Finish.

    I've only tried pure non-polymerized tung oil (Lee Valley) once and it was a disaster. It never really dried and in the end I used steel wool and mineral spirits to get it off.
    I then put some Watco on.

    I search for enlightenment.
    Jonathan Lee
    My science page

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Between a rock and a wall
    Posts
    527
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Good Outdoor Wood Finish.

    Check out this stuff - Rubio Monocoat : Interior Products
    I used their interior product when i finished a kitchen counter top project (made of reclaimed hardwoods). Turned out very nice. Quality stuff.
    Rick Stubblefield

    Luxury is a neccessity after the first time.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Willy, VIC
    Posts
    1,640
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Good Outdoor Wood Finish.

    Quote Originally Posted by summilux View Post
    I've only tried pure non-polymerized tung oil (Lee Valley) once and it was a disaster. It never really dried >>>
    I search for enlightenment.
    The key is oxygen ingress. The oil doesn't dry, it polymerises and the process is oxidative. The usual cause of problems such as you describe is that the base layer is starved of oxygen. Oxygen will permeate through wood quite well but the permeation rate through tung oil is very low, so if the oil layer is too thick or a second layer is laid down before the first has polymerised you will get oxygen starvation. The result will be a partially polymerised surface sitting on a less polymerised base which creates a gummy mess.

    Thinning the initial layers can help or make things worse: it thins out the layers, making polymerisation faster, but it drives the oil deeper into the wood which slows oxygen access. If you are going to thin use a terpene solvent: I prefer cineole (Euky) but I'm in Australia so that's easy for me to say. d-Limonene (citrus oil) also works well, gum turpentine (artist's turpentine) is an alternative.

    I prefer to use a rag for application, a brush will give you too many thick patches. Apply a layer of oil, allow it to soak in for a few minutes then wipe away any excess: visible oil is just stopping the oxygen getting to the oil in the wood. Apply the next layer once the first has absorbed enough oxygen: this is dependent on the wood and the temperature, if in doubt, wait. Keep doing this until the oil no longer soaks into the wood: this can take up to eight applications over the course of two or more days. If using a solvent decrease the solvent concentration as the layers progress, at least the last two applications should be pure oil with no added solvent.

    WIPE OFF THE OIL THAT DIDN"T SOAK IN.

    Now take the last piece of sandpaper you used when preparing the wood surface (this will be 600 grit in my case) and start sanding very vigourously with the grain. You must sand hard enough that you can feel the heat generated. The oil will combine with the sawdust and create a fine filler: if this builds to a level where it smears you have gone too early, wipe the piece down and come back the next day. If it dries out and gets crumbly wipe the paper (not the wood) with your oil rag.

    Once this is finished put the piece aside for 24 hours. Repeat the process above with a new piece of the next grade of paper (800 grit) then rest it again. Then 1200, then 1500, then 2000. On the seventh day you can rest.

Similar Threads

  1. Indoor vs Outdoor
    By LarryA in forum Oxygen Depraved
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 01-14-2017, 11:10 PM
  2. Finish carpenters + wood workers throw me a bone.
    By false_aesthetic in forum The OT
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 02-14-2015, 06:08 AM
  3. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 07-19-2014, 06:29 AM
  4. Indoor vs. Outdoor
    By Saab2000 in forum Oxygen Depraved
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 08-03-2013, 10:31 AM
  5. OT: outdoor heaters
    By justinf in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 11-04-2010, 06:42 AM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •