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Thread: Zanconato Custom Cycles

  1. #101
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    Default Re: Zanconato Custom Cycles

    Quote Originally Posted by Shinomaster View Post
    Mike, I want an aluminum road bike.
    Me too. Someday....
    Mike Zanconato
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  2. #102
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    Default Re: Zanconato Custom Cycles

    Mike,

    HI, interested in hearing your thoughts on some of the up and coming "technologies/features" in frames- are they gimmicks, merely aesthetics or do they have tangible benefits and do you plan on integrating any of them or others into any of your frames?

    1. Integrated seat mast versus conventional seatpost

    2. Larger 1.5" lower headset bearing versus coventional 1" or 1-1/8"

    3. Press in/fit bottom brackets versus standard cups/cartridges

    Thanks!
     

  3. #103
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    Default Re: Zanconato Custom Cycles

    Quote Originally Posted by riceburner View Post
    Mike,

    HI, interested in hearing your thoughts on some of the up and coming "technologies/features" in frames- are they gimmicks, merely aesthetics or do they have tangible benefits and do you plan on integrating any of them or others into any of your frames?

    1. Integrated seat mast versus conventional seatpost

    2. Larger 1.5" lower headset bearing versus coventional 1" or 1-1/8"

    3. Press in/fit bottom brackets versus standard cups/cartridges

    Thanks!
    Good question! Let me start by saying this. Different frame materials are different enough that some design elements work in some materials and maybe aren't as beneficial in others. The real question I ask myself is "are we taking advantage of the potential these new design elements allow for?". I think all three of the designs you mention have the potential for tangible benefit. Some manufacturers have already taken advantage. Take BB30. I think one real benefit is the narrower profile. My heels wear cranksets right at the spider, especially in cross. It's just the way I pedal. Would I want a narrower U factor? You bet. What puzzles me is why some crank manufacturers would design a BB30 crank with the same U factor as their regular crank.

    I'm getting off track. Let's look at the 1.125/1.5" tapered steerer. Do I think it's a good idea? Sure. There has got to be potential there for a greater stiffness/weight ratio. But at the moment, I would not use that design. In a steel frame, it would be serious overkill (not to mention heavy!). Could I see using it in the future? It depends on what materials and fabrication techniques I become proficient with.

    There's lots of stuff going on with BBs at the moment. I think BB30 is here to stay, at least for the next ten years or so. There are certainly manufacturing efficiencies associated with a non-threaded shell. The question is will PF30 become the standard. It's nice that the grooves are no longer necessary, but it's an even larger shell. Hey, that could actually be an advantage for aluminum or carbon, but it makes for an even more expensive titanium BB shell. So as I mentioned at the beginning of the post, these designs work for some materials and probably aren't the best for others.

    Phew...I'm rambling and straying today. I better go back to work.
    Mike Zanconato
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  4. #104
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    Default Re: Zanconato Custom Cycles

    Quote Originally Posted by VertigoCycles View Post
    So happy you wrote that.
    Sean, Ed at SRAM knows how I feel. He didn't really want to hear it
    Mike Zanconato
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  5. #105
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    Default Re: Zanconato Custom Cycles

    Quote Originally Posted by corko View Post
    Removed .......
    Oh come on...you removed it before I could respond. I was going to! You made me laugh.
    Mike Zanconato
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  6. #106
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    Default Re: Zanconato Custom Cycles

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr.President View Post
    Hell none of you have anything on teachers, we are the most deviant group out there.


    Z,

    Had a qustion regarding what you said here...I am copying as I still don't know how to quote peopel multiple times, so please excuse me.

    Good morning. This is a good one. Thanks for asking. For me, each frame is a representation of the relationship I have with the customer. It's more than just a collection of tubes, but I don't get emotionally attached either

    My question is about the relationship with customers. I understand why it might be beneficial not to get too involved with a customer, but do you ever wish that you could? I think cycling is unique on the aspect of meeting new folks and building relationships with them. I have not encountered anything else like it in my few years on the planet. I totally get not allowing yourself to get involved emotionally with the frames you produce, but are there folks you really look forward to building for? I would imagine family of course, but are there people who you would love to see in the que? Other builders perhaps?

    I suppose this could lead into who would you love to build a frame for, but not trying to send too loaded of a question.
    Hmmm...interesting one. My dad has a saying. It's "do you want to be my friend or my customer?". He has a shop that's conducive to guys coming in, hanging out, and expecting that my dad will shoot the breeze with him about his 1952 Studebaker. Hey, my dad loves Studebakers, but early-on in the business he thought he had to spend lots of time with these guys thinking/hoping it would lead to more business from them. All it really got him were late nights making up for the lost time. So that's when he started using that saying in his own way; a way that few can get away with. Said properly, most people hear "I've got work to do. Let's chat over a beer later." and they get it. That's why I like the internet. I can answer when I have a few spare moments during my 4:00 lunch.

    Back to the point (the theme of the day for me). Sure, there are bikes I really look forward to building and customers I really look forward to working with. Maybe it's his passion. Maybe it's her excitement. And maybe sometimes it's because he sent me 4 position numbers, said "go to town and paint it white pearl", and then I don't hear from him again until I call to say it's done. It all depends on what's going on that day or week.

    All right, all right. You broke me down. Who would I love to build a frame for? Well...

    Maria Sharapova



    I think she could use a nice bike to train on for her tennis career.
    Mike Zanconato
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  7. #107
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    Default Re: Zanconato Custom Cycles

    We all know, or have some idea what makes your work similar to other made to measure/custom frames/bicycles, ie. Quality materials, tester joinery methods, attention to detail, and the delicate balance of producing a frame that is both esthetically pleasing and functional, but what makes your bike different?

    I think that it goes without saying that each of the builders in the “smoked out” thread create superior work, so without comparing yourself directly to another builder(s), what is it about your frames/bicycles that draws (or will draw) in clients?

    Thanks
    Andy
     

  8. #108
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    Default Re: Zanconato Custom Cycles

    Quote Originally Posted by dcpdpayne View Post
    We all know, or have some idea what makes your work similar to other made to measure/custom frames/bicycles, ie. Quality materials, tester joinery methods, attention to detail, and the delicate balance of producing a frame that is both esthetically pleasing and functional, but what makes your bike different?

    I think that it goes without saying that each of the builders in the “smoked out” thread create superior work, so without comparing yourself directly to another builder(s), what is it about your frames/bicycles that draws (or will draw) in clients?

    Thanks
    Andy
    One word...



    I think my customers are drawn in by a common understanding and appreciation for purpose, design, and aesthetics. They may not know exactly what it is about the bikes that appeals to them; they just sense it and feel it. I can talk about design until I'm blue in the face, but a connection is made when they see it and get what I'm talking about.

    What draws you in to a brand?
    Mike Zanconato
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  9. #109
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    Default Re: Zanconato Custom Cycles

    Quote Originally Posted by zank View Post
    Hmmm...interesting one. My dad has a saying. It's "do you want to be my friend or my customer?". He has a shop that's conducive to guys coming in, hanging out, and expecting that my dad will shoot the breeze with him about his 1952 Studebaker. Hey, my dad loves Studebakers, but early-on in the business he thought he had to spend lots of time with these guys thinking/hoping it would lead to more business from them. All it really got him were late nights making up for the lost time. So that's when he started using that saying in his own way; a way that few can get away with. Said properly, most people hear "I've got work to do. Let's chat over a beer later." and they get it. That's why I like the internet. I can answer when I have a few spare moments during my 4:00 lunch.

    Back to the point (the theme of the day for me). Sure, there are bikes I really look forward to building and customers I really look forward to working with. Maybe it's his passion. Maybe it's her excitement. And maybe sometimes it's because he sent me 4 position numbers, said "go to town and paint it white pearl", and then I don't hear from him again until I call to say it's done. It all depends on what's going on that day or week.

    All right, all right. You broke me down. Who would I love to build a frame for? Well...

    Maria Sharapova



    I think she could use a nice bike to train on for her tennis career.
    damn, darren we'd jump the net on the higher end for that --- longer from corner to corner and shorter in the center ....

    zank, ya sho now how to pick a lady...
    what's my question ----

    alzheimer's ronnie
     

  10. #110
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    Default Re: Zanconato Custom Cycles

    Yo Ronnie, I'll wait for you. Take your time.
    Mike Zanconato
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  11. #111
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    Default Re: Zanconato Custom Cycles

    Don't be shy. Feel free to respond to my responses. Let's get a little back and forth going. I fully expected someone to call me a nut by now.
    Mike Zanconato
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  12. #112
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    Default Re: Zanconato Custom Cycles

    we are waiting for pics.

  13. #113
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    Default Re: Zanconato Custom Cycles

    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathan View Post
    we are waiting for pics.
    pic #106, my bud ---- what bikes .....
     

  14. #114
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    Default Re: Zanconato Custom Cycles

    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathan View Post
    we are waiting for pics.
    Zank said I could share:

    GO!

  15. #115
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    Default Re: Zanconato Custom Cycles

    Quote Originally Posted by davids View Post
    Zank said I could share:

    Nice! What tubing?
     

  16. #116
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    Default Re: Zanconato Custom Cycles

    What is the signature functional design element of your frames?
     

  17. #117
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    Default Re: Zanconato Custom Cycles

    Quote Originally Posted by jsrieck View Post
    What is the signature functional design element of your frames?
    Thought.
    Mike Zanconato
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  18. #118
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    Default Re: Zanconato Custom Cycles

    Your latest FNL pics show some pins. Is that a part of your usual build process?

    Also, your style evokes the golden age of lugged racing bikes. The appeal of that kind of construction doesn't need explanation to those of us who came of age in cycling before the mid-90s or so. However, the damn kids these days may not get it (or maybe they do, I'm just not one of the damn kids anymore). I get the sense your business is growing, but do you foresee a need to evolve your style or adopt different construction methods to appeal to buyers who didn't grow up with the same influences?

    Also also: you love cross, you race cross, you sponsor cross racers. Do you think that's helping build your business, or do you do it solely for love of the sport?
    Last edited by jscott; 04-30-2010 at 10:49 PM. Reason: "maintain relevancy" wasn't quite what I meant...
     

  19. #119
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    Default Re: Zanconato Custom Cycles

    Has Colnago geometry (slack head head angle) influenced your geometries? Do you have a philosophy to your geometries?
    For example I've heard e-Richie state many times his philosphy of long and low.
    Finally thanks for all your reponses. It is truly a treat to peek inside your business and craftmanship.
     

  20. #120
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    Default Re: Zanconato Custom Cycles

    Couple of questions, mostly building off of questions that have already been asked.

    First, I like a routine and find I am more productive when I have things that I do at the same time, in the same sequence from day to day. So, do you have a set daily schedule? For example do you like to take the first few hours of the morning and devote them to frame building (or maybe you can get more specific, for instance maybe you like filing or mitering), while tackling more administrative tasks in the afternoon- something like that?

    Second, in an earlier post you said you had used the resources available to small businesses when you started your business. I'm curious as to the genesis of your business. Did you start with any sort of business back ground or is business acumen something you developed as you went along? Have you taken business classes? Or did your frame building business sort of grew more organically, kind of grew however it grew (I think you said there was no business plan)? Do you see yourself in the future hiring someone to run the administrative aspect of the business, a'la Carl Strong and his wife, or is it something you enjoy controlling?

    Just thought of a third question... riding? What kinds of rides do you end up on most often? During the course of a regular week how much do you get out and about on two wheels? I know you race cross, but have you ever done road racing? And if so how influential is that in your road bike design? Or do you rely more on rider feedback regarding design?
     

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