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Thread: Richard Sachs Cycles

  1. #1841
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    Default Re: Richard Sachs Cycles

    Sometimes I leave the driveway and turn right and have no idea where I wanna go. There is no shortage of cool roads and places to ride. But every so often my mind can't make itself up. There are times when this happens that I go straight to the water line.

    We live near the river and also the Sound. Some of my favorite pedaling moments include riding in and around these areas. Town beaches. Boatyards. Wildlife refuges. Land trusts. None have roads that are too long. But when I string them together, it's sublime.

    I grew up on Newark Bay. As a child I summered in Belmar. The shorelines always call me back. There's something about going to the very edge where the land ends and there's nothing left but water. It's soothing. Serene. And puts everything right.

    All This By Hand


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    Default Re: Richard Sachs Cycles

    and you can collect shells tooooo!

    Good to see you my friend!

    KJ

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    Default Re: Richard Sachs Cycles

    Quote Originally Posted by e-RICHIE View Post
    Riding is for pondering. Especially now, itís for pondering. .....

    It is a funny coincidence that, the same day you posted this, I posted a bike ride on Strava titled "Pondering"
    I called it that because I rode through Ponder Texas and because that's what I was doing as I rode through.
    Bike rides are indeed good for that.

    I see that we were both riding bikes that we built ourselves.
    Mark Walberg
    Building bike frames for fun since 1973.

  4. #1844
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    Default Re: Richard Sachs Cycles

    It happens each season when the weatherman taps you to remind that this is the week. For me it was last Tuesday. Until then and for as long as I can remember, for as long as I want to remember, it was a pair of bibs and a jersey.

    The thermals were easy to find. Hanging dutifully in a corner of the basement, they were next to the box marked ďeverything else.Ē The gloves, the arm-warmers, the base layers. All the armor one needs to fen off the elements.

    By Wednesday my wardrobe changed into one I expect to wear until the snow flies. Thatís when I no longer ride outside, and my walking routine commences. Iíve always walked rather than ride indoors. I need the fresh air.

    This was also the week I (finally) accepted my present, one without races but - more importantly - one in which Iím no longer a racer. I knew last October that I was done with lining up. I began to embrace it these past few days.

    All my life (so far) Iíve lived with, lived for, learned on, and profited from the weekends. These were when I played bicycle racing. I fell into my sportís net as a teenager and spent my adulthood happily entangled. This no more.

    Iíve been on my bicycle more in 2020 than any season since the last century. Perhaps at a slower pace, much of it. With the chain on those once seldom used cogs nearer to the hub. Thatís where my comfort zone is now.

    All This By Hand



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    Default Re: Richard Sachs Cycles

    Quote Originally Posted by e-RICHIE View Post
    With the chain on those once seldom used cogs nearer to the hub.
    I've always looked at that damn cassette as a man's life. Indicative to his age but in dog years. So, I rejoice every time Campagnolo adds another cog.
    Rick Stubblefield

    If the process is more important than the result, you play. If the result is more important than the process, you work.

  6. #1846
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    Default Re: Richard Sachs Cycles

    Quote Originally Posted by Ras72 View Post
    I've always looked at that damn cassette as a man's life. Indicative to his age but in dog years. So, I rejoice every time Campagnolo adds another cog.
    What uses five cogs in the morning, eight cogs in the afternoon, and thirteen cogs in the evening?

  7. #1847
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    Default Re: Richard Sachs Cycles

    Richard, that was a damn good essay.

  8. #1848
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    Default Re: Richard Sachs Cycles

    This made me.

    Hello Richard,

    Your amazing creation is still going strong at 44 years old. It is practically unchanged since I assembled it in 1976, when I was 19 years old. These photos were taken on my farm in Harwinton CT., just this week. Yesterday I rode 25 miles on the Farmington Canal Rail/Trail with two of my daughters, aged 23 and 29. They understand that my bike means a lot to me, as I point out the workmanship that never fails to impress me. When I ride the trail, they know I am always looking for a quality steel frame that I can point out to them. Sadly, there is mostly the abundance of Trek and Giant carbon and aluminum frames. I find no beauty in these bikes. Like you have said, 'they are manufactured, not made'. My daughter rides a small Chas Roberts bike from the early 80's, with full Campy Record gear. I point out where this frame is very good, but yours is better. They see the differences.

    I am now 64 and retired from many years working in aerospace mfg., at one time a manufacturing engineer of finely made components. My love of bicycles as a teen drew me to that profession. I understand every nuance of metallurgy, in both the frame materials and the components. Although the frames you produce today are superior to mine, I view my own bike as an elegant work of perfection. The simplicity of the Nervex lugs, and gently sloping sloping fork crown have never left me wishing for more. One would think at my age I would be beyond getting emotional about frame symmetry and the beauty of lugs. However, I find myself looking at these photos for a long time. There are no carbon fiber fiber components or sealed bearings. It was a different era. I tell people that in the 70's, you could not produce a better bike. I prefer to keep it 'period correct'.

    It was at the 1975 show in New York that I came upon your small display. You had no flashy banners or advertising media, yet I was immediately drawn to your work. Your frames had unimpressive paint, no chrome, pin-striping, cutouts, and only a one color offering. My friends were drawn to the other big names like Colnago and Masi. Still, after conferring with these friends and coworkers from our shop in New Rochelle, I convinced them that your frames were the most impressive I had seen, for their simple elegance.

    I didn't even have a picture of your frames, only at little trifold pamphlet. The image of your work was fixed in my memory. Folks today don't appreciate that we grew up in an era without Google to call up images. The library was no help with this either. I promised myself to one day have one of your frames. This commitment came from perhaps twenty minutes of first seeing your work, and never having any endorsement, or reference. A few months later I had a collision with a taxi cab on my commute to the shop, destroying my Motobecane Grand Jubile. Within a few days I reached out to you to build the bike I have loved ever since.

    At 19, this was to be my 'forever' bike. I worked in bike shops all throughout college years, repairing all manner of inferior quality bikes. I wanted this bike to be special, and perfect. Being in the trade afforded me the opportunity to purchase wholesale and I bought a 1975 full Campy Groupo for $265. This was a bargain even then. When that carton of tan boxes arrived with the stripes and the Campagnolo script, I was like a kid in a candy shop, constantly unboxing and playing with each item. All totaled, the bike cost me about $750, but remember at that time I was clearing only about $100 per week, and could set aside only about $70 for my dream bike. It took me several months of 1976 to save enough. I selected DT spokes and Mavic rims, and laced these wheels 40 'plus' years ago and have never broken a spoke. The saddle dates to 1972, when I, like you, bought an Atala Grand Prix. They were popular at the time. I quickly started replacing components, realizing that most of it was junk. That started my love of bicycles, and subsequently working in shops.

    In my 20's, I rode this bike three times across Europe, outfitted with fifty pounds of gear. This has never been an ornamental bike, relegated to hanging in a shop and never loved. To pass it on from from one owner to another would be a betrayal of the joy it has given me over the years, not just in riding, but gazing in admiration at its beauty. It's like owning a rare musical instrument that will never be sold. I wonder if you had any idea that the frame you made in 1976 would still be actively ridden in 2020, by the same original owner. To me, that notion would be incomprehensible. There is a legacy at work here. It is more than just metal tubes and components. When I ride this bike, it transports me back in time. But, I am riding with my grown girls today. It is magical. Perhaps someday I can pass it down to right person who will fully appreciate it, ride it often, and safeguard it for generations to come.

    With much appreciation,

    ------ ----





  9. #1849
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    Default Re: Richard Sachs Cycles

    Quote Originally Posted by e-RICHIE View Post
    This made me.

    This is a very cool story, I see why the letter made your day, a real beauty.
    Take care of yourself in this time of crisis and realize sadness, anger and grief are part of the process Brian Clare

  10. #1850
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    Default Re: Richard Sachs Cycles

    Wow! A good reminder (if one is needed) of why people celebrate the opportunity to jump on the queue.
    I speak from experience. And long to make a similar story.

    Thanks for sharing Richie.
    Rick Stubblefield

    If the process is more important than the result, you play. If the result is more important than the process, you work.

  11. #1851
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    Default Re: Richard Sachs Cycles

    I was wondering about the age of the foam grips. But apparently theyíre still around to purchase:

    https://porkchopbmx.com/grab-on-maxi...e-grips-black/

    Some on Amazon, too.

  12. #1852
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    Default Re: Richard Sachs Cycles

    Maybe twice each week my rides take me south along the shoreline. Itís an area thatís flatter and more open. Where I can stay seated longer. There are fewer trees and wider skies. So much of cycling is about tan lines. Mine is.

    For the last few years Iíve been collecting seashells. To the point of obsession. It must go back to my childhood when I summered in Belmar. These rides allow me a chance to grab some. The Long Island Sound isnít the Atlantic.

    The shells are different here. But like anything that nature serves, one canít rate them. The shapes and textures are what they are. Colors too. Each time Iím on the shoreline I fill one of my three back pockets until it bulges.

    Itís a bit funny. There are beaches that dot the area for many miles, but only two I hit when I want to add to my collection. Odd, but they both share the same name, Private Beach. It sounds like an oxymoron. A coincidence?

    At Private Beach (either of them, both of them) I have a routine. I drop the bicycle in the sand, walk around for 10 minutes, and look for cool shells. Some see me coming and say, ďTake me.Ē Others I notice, then kneel, and pick up.

    Part of the ritual is this. Before I leave I find a spot in the sand and, with my finger, write my momís name. Then next to it I draw a heart. Then I press my right hand in and make an imprint. And I place the most lovely shell next to this.

    When Iím done, I stand up, look at the sand, and say, ďI love you Bobbe.Ē Thereís never anyone around when Iím at Private Beach. These moments give me a timeout from life to remember who gave me mine. Then I leave.

    All This By Hand




  13. #1853
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    Default Re: Richard Sachs Cycles

    Richard- Thanks for sharing this. I do some of the same sort of memorializing for my late wife, even after the 13 years she's been gone. Most of mine is very internal, most all when riding. I find riding to free up the mind. Some small part stays attentive to the road and such but the free ranging not quite sub conscious mind wanders. I ride past scenes that remind me of our past and feel the pleasure of having shared them before with her. Thanks for making me think about this while I just sit at my desk:) Andy
    Andy Stewart
    10%

  14. #1854
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    Default Re: Richard Sachs Cycles

    Quote Originally Posted by Marvinlungwitz View Post
    I was wondering about the age of the foam grips. But apparently they’re still around to purchase:

    https://porkchopbmx.com/grab-on-maxi...e-grips-black/

    Some on Amazon, too.
    Often a real pain to remove!
    Andrea "Gattonero" Cattolico, head mechanic @Condor Cycles London


    "Caron, non ti crucciare:
    vuolsi cosž colŗ dove si puote
    ciÚ che si vuole, e piý non dimandare"

  15. #1855
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    Default Re: Richard Sachs Cycles

    Once you develop a routine (as in, what goes where), you become part of the score. In my workroom, Iím a dot connector. The conductor. I know from repetition and routine that the metal I'm holding or the tool on my bench Ė these have a place in the sound I want to make. After a while, itís jazz. Itís calculated. There is a method at work. But thereís also some freedom. Wiggle room. I try to exist in that space that has no floor. Off the ground, so to speak. I juggle. And the ideal is when all my balls stay above me, and none hit the ground. But if they do fall, Iíll channel my inner PeeWee Herman and proclaim, ďI meant to do that.Ē

    All This By Hand



  16. #1856
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    Default Re: Richard Sachs Cycles

    Thank you for putting this up Richard. It is touching, and a very good piece of writing.

    jn

    "Thursday"

    (in reply to #1852 )

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