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Thread: Coconino Cycles

  1. #141
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    Default Re: Coconino Cycles

    That's great to hear Steve. Glad the community came together and you're able to offer a great carrot. Good on you.. and best to the folks involved.
     

  2. #142
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    Default Re: Coconino Cycles

    rolling & trimming to raw length 32' of top tubes, two diameters + two different wall thicknesses, plus making 4" fishmouthed seattube sleeves. Barry the sometimes shop helper pictured. great to have him back in the shop this winter when his biz slows a bit. - Garro.
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    Steve Garro, Coconino Cycles.
    Frames & Bicycles built to measure and Custom wheels
    Hecho en Flagstaff, Arizona desde 2003
    www.coconinocycles.com
    www.coconinocycles.blogspot.com

  3. #143
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    Steve Garro, Coconino Cycles.
    Frames & Bicycles built to measure and Custom wheels
    Hecho en Flagstaff, Arizona desde 2003
    www.coconinocycles.com
    www.coconinocycles.blogspot.com

  4. #144
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    steve-

    its been a pleasure reading your smoked out section. you've obviously got the skill and your bikes are fucking awesome, but honestly, you're a cool cat and id be proud and happy to swing my leg over and jump on one of your bikes. personality and coolness is important, and you've got that. everyone @ v digs u.

    keep up the good work
     

  5. #145
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    Steve,

    I honestly can't remember/find if this question has already been asked, so I apologize if it has.

    With such an awesome program like BikeCad out there, what advantage/benefit do you find from doing a full size hand drawn blueprint?

    Love your work and blog. Keep it up.

    Tony
    Anthony Maietta
    Web Site | Blog | Flickr
    "The person who says it can not be done, should not interrupt the person doing it."

  6. #146
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    Quote Originally Posted by anthonymaietta View Post
    Steve,

    I honestly can't remember/find if this question has already been asked, so I apologize if it has.

    With such an awesome program like BikeCad out there, what advantage/benefit do you find from doing a full size hand drawn blueprint?

    Love your work and blog. Keep it up.

    Tony
    I love drafting, took it all through school. Less computer time in life = better. I'm making it with my hands, I may as well draw it with them too. I can hold parts up to the drawing to check them instantly in real time. I can write notes to myself while I work. I don't fiddle with geometries, I've figured out what I want before I start drawing while building the previous bike - I've been working on bikes professionally for 22yrs. all I need to draw is the front triangle, the CS's are a set length & fixtured in my Anvil fixture, and the SS's are made from scratch. Plus, and this is a big one - when I'm done the client gets the bluprint & they all dig that. - Garro.
    Steve Garro, Coconino Cycles.
    Frames & Bicycles built to measure and Custom wheels
    Hecho en Flagstaff, Arizona desde 2003
    www.coconinocycles.com
    www.coconinocycles.blogspot.com

  7. #147
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    Default Re: Coconino Cycles

    Hi Steve,
    Can you comment a little bit on downtube thicknesses/strength in your bikes? I notice that (at least in the photos I can recall) you don't use a gusset; is this true for big/heavy guys & 29ers as well as 26" bikes? Does susp fork vs. rigid impact this decision? What kind of wall thicknesses and butt lengths would you consider the minimum for a given weight rider/likely use?

    I'm mostly a road guy but am planning to build a couple of MTBs soon and am looking at the options for maintaining/increasing strength at the DT/HT junction.

    Thanks in advance for any pearls of wisdom!

    Best,
    John
     

  8. #148
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    Quote Originally Posted by echelon_john View Post
    Hi Steve,
    Can you comment a little bit on downtube thicknesses/strength in your bikes? I notice that (at least in the photos I can recall) you don't use a gusset; is this true for big/heavy guys & 29ers as well as 26" bikes? Does susp fork vs. rigid impact this decision? What kind of wall thicknesses and butt lengths would you consider the minimum for a given weight rider/likely use?

    I'm mostly a road guy but am planning to build a couple of MTBs soon and am looking at the options for maintaining/increasing strength at the DT/HT junction.

    Thanks in advance for any pearls of wisdom!

    Best,
    John
    I don't put out much on tubing choices, but i'll say this: the overall length of the tube will do the choosing for you. there are only a few really viable 29er choices that combine strength with longevity + are long enough with the long ATC + ~ 63mm BB drop that will work {generally 670mm +}. you are not going to find anything less then 35mm & 9/6/9 on any 29er I make, unless it's kind of on the smaller side & rigid, then there is a 35mm x 9/6/7 that works real nice. I'm also apeing Soulcraft & saying "no more suspention corrected forks or frames built for them" void on the warrenty. rigid forks over ~ 440mm ATC are dangerous IMO. They have to be over built, as does the DT or failure will happen {recall that thread awhile back?} you have to get off the fence. rigid or suspention - decide. I also like somthing thicker then 7/4/7 for off road just for dent resistance, unless it's a relly light rider. again, IMO - Garro.
    Steve Garro, Coconino Cycles.
    Frames & Bicycles built to measure and Custom wheels
    Hecho en Flagstaff, Arizona desde 2003
    www.coconinocycles.com
    www.coconinocycles.blogspot.com

  9. #149
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    Default Re: Coconino Cycles

    Thanks for the response! I figured 9/6/9 would be pretty much the minimum for the DT, whether suspended or unsuspended. Assume you are saying that if it's a rigid setup you'd consider going even thicker? Also, just so I'm clear, you'll build rigid 29er forks/framesets that aren't susp. corrected so you can minimize the ATC--the size of the 'lever' that's stressing the DT/HT junction, and suspension-compatible 29er frames with tube dimensions like you mentioned, because the suspension should be lessening the stress on the DT/HT junction?

    Is there any situation where you do use a gusset? I know there are plenty of pros and cons...just curious what your take is.

    Thanks Steve--appreciate your thoughts and the info you continue to share, esp with regard to fillet brazing and fillers/flux. It's all really helpful.

    John
     

  10. #150
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    Quote Originally Posted by echelon_john View Post
    Thanks for the response! I figured 9/6/9 would be pretty much the minimum for the DT, whether suspended or unsuspended. Assume you are saying that if it's a rigid setup you'd consider going even thicker? Also, just so I'm clear, you'll build rigid 29er forks/framesets that aren't susp. corrected so you can minimize the ATC--the size of the 'lever' that's stressing the DT/HT junction, and suspension-compatible 29er frames with tube dimensions like you mentioned, because the suspension should be lessening the stress on the DT/HT junction?

    Is there any situation where you do use a gusset? I know there are plenty of pros and cons...just curious what your take is.

    Thanks Steve--appreciate your thoughts and the info you continue to share, esp with regard to fillet brazing and fillers/flux. It's all really helpful.

    John
    you mostly nailed it there, with the exception that I use a thinner DT as the ATC gets shorter - less leverage on the DT. also - think of butting as internal gusseting without the external stress riser........check out the 35mmx750mm supertherm DT. that sucka will love you long time - Garro.
    Steve Garro, Coconino Cycles.
    Frames & Bicycles built to measure and Custom wheels
    Hecho en Flagstaff, Arizona desde 2003
    www.coconinocycles.com
    www.coconinocycles.blogspot.com

  11. #151
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    thanks man. going to see our friend bob mould on tuesday night. celebrated summer never gets old.

    john
     

  12. #152
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    Quote Originally Posted by echelon_john View Post
    thanks man. going to see our friend bob mould on tuesday night. celebrated summer never gets old.

    john
    nice! I've been stuck on "metal circus" "zen arcade" and "the living end" lately - Garro.
    Steve Garro, Coconino Cycles.
    Frames & Bicycles built to measure and Custom wheels
    Hecho en Flagstaff, Arizona desde 2003
    www.coconinocycles.com
    www.coconinocycles.blogspot.com

  13. #153
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    Quote Originally Posted by steve garro View Post
    I love drafting, took it all through school. Less computer time in life = better. I'm making it with my hands, I may as well draw it with them too. I can hold parts up to the drawing to check them instantly in real time. I can write notes to myself while I work. I don't fiddle with geometries, I've figured out what I want before I start drawing while building the previous bike - I've been working on bikes professionally for 22yrs. all I need to draw is the front triangle, the CS's are a set length & fixtured in my Anvil fixture, and the SS's are made from scratch. Plus, and this is a big one - when I'm done the client gets the bluprint & they all dig that. - Garro.
    I so miss drafting! I just don't have a shop large enough to dedicate the space. Some day! Love your style and simplicity Garro! Do you change your stay length for your... monster randos (for lack of a better term) or do you really keep it where you like it regardless? Thanks!-Chris

  14. #154
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dornbox View Post
    I so miss drafting! I just don't have a shop large enough to dedicate the space. Some day! Love your style and simplicity Garro! Do you change your stay length for your... monster randos (for lack of a better term) or do you really keep it where you like it regardless? Thanks!-Chris
    you caught me going out the door! a complete front triangle & three wheel builds for today :} The CS length is different for *every* bike.........and, it's always where I like it - Garro.
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    Steve Garro, Coconino Cycles.
    Frames & Bicycles built to measure and Custom wheels
    Hecho en Flagstaff, Arizona desde 2003
    www.coconinocycles.com
    www.coconinocycles.blogspot.com

  15. #155
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    Quote Originally Posted by steve garro View Post
    it's always where I like it - Garro.
    Nice! -Chris

  16. #156
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    Default Re: Coconino Cycles

    shipping day - maxxed out on custom wheels. left to right.....DT-Swiss/XT, Velocity synergy x ultegra, Phil Wood x Stan's flows, DT-Swiss x Paul fixed/Schmidt Dyno - some sweet hoops going out to AZ, Wash DC, WA & Chi-Town - Garro.
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    Steve Garro, Coconino Cycles.
    Frames & Bicycles built to measure and Custom wheels
    Hecho en Flagstaff, Arizona desde 2003
    www.coconinocycles.com
    www.coconinocycles.blogspot.com

  17. #157
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    Hey Mountain man,

    Do you think there is any merit to the idea of building a 26R - 29F MTB? I like the idea of how well 29's roll but I'm not a fan of the long stays required. Have you done this?

    dave
    D. Kirk
    Kirk Frameworks Co.
    www.kirkframeworks.com


  18. #158
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Kirk View Post
    Hey Mountain man,

    Do you think there is any merit to the idea of building a 26R - 29F MTB? I like the idea of how well 29's roll but I'm not a fan of the long stays required. Have you done this?

    dave
    Yep. I did one that takes a 26" rear & either a 29 x 3.35" *or* a 26" x 3.7"/4.0" in the front - it lives in Osaka. the guy loves it. Moots does one, too. I think it's a very good idea. - Garro.
    Steve Garro, Coconino Cycles.
    Frames & Bicycles built to measure and Custom wheels
    Hecho en Flagstaff, Arizona desde 2003
    www.coconinocycles.com
    www.coconinocycles.blogspot.com

  19. #159
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    Default Re: Coconino Cycles

    Cool.

    I haven't decided yet if I will go rigid or with a suspension fork. Do you have a 29'r suspension fork that you know and love?

    Dave
    D. Kirk
    Kirk Frameworks Co.
    www.kirkframeworks.com


  20. #160
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    Default Re: Coconino Cycles

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Kirk View Post
    Cool.

    I haven't decided yet if I will go rigid or with a suspension fork. Do you have a 29'r suspension fork that you know and love?

    Dave
    they almost always leave here with either a Fox or a Rock Shox Reba, unless fully non-suspended. Fox was kicking the shit out of everyone on the suspention front, but i have to say - the new RS feel *really* good. the negative air feature really lets you "float" in the travel, and if you want remote lockout RS has you covered. I've sent out a few of the new SID's on 26ers, and man - they are light, feel great, and are simple & easy on the eye. Likely, everyone had to up their game in the last few yrs. Sram has done a great job with RS, if they had not bought them they may be DOA by now - Garro.
    Steve Garro, Coconino Cycles.
    Frames & Bicycles built to measure and Custom wheels
    Hecho en Flagstaff, Arizona desde 2003
    www.coconinocycles.com
    www.coconinocycles.blogspot.com

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