User Tag List

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 1176

Thread: Amaro Bikes

Hybrid View

Previous Post Previous Post   Next Post Next Post
  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Bilbao
    Posts
    2,672
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Amaro Bikes

    My name is Aimar Fraga Angoitia, I was born in Bilbao (Spain) in 1976. Can't remember much of childhood, just long summers on the countryside with grandparents in an isolated house at the mountains, riding a small bike around the house all morning long and some time on the land during afternoons.

    Years went by just going to school, studying music/violin, playing soccer, skateboarding... till the 90's arrived with all the MTB craze, ending up with a white K2 MTB. That's probably the beginning of my conscious cycling life. First came simple weekend rides with friends, then some popular races and that was it, a number placed on my jersey and it was point of no return. By this time, in Spain any serious competitive cyclist should be on the road, so jump into a road bike and got fatally hooked by the road racing rituals.

    Some time later I ended up violin professor studies and had to decide on university, which finally happened to be computer engineering. University time was time for Sub-23 racing, which meant a loop of morning training and afternoon classes, together with suffering and pain weekends where chasing the group was almost a state of mind. Even if those crazy days where cool as you were racing close to such people as Freire, Mayo, Möller, Etxebarria, etc, it was like getting invited to a VIP room where you're not allowed to talk, so after four years on the sub-23/Elite VIP room, I had enough of going nowhere and hanged the bike not even wanting to see it again any time soon. Training/Racing gone, there's a huge void and many hours to fill‚ so apart from university I worked at my father's die-manufacturing factory where I helped out drawing plans, tolerance measuring, etc. During this time I was also very keen into motorcycles and classic/sport cars, having the chance to have some nice ones to learn that owning something usually does feel incredibly weak and meaningless comparing with the "dreaming about it" process. The poison of possession...

    Anyway, computer engineer studies finished I extended another year with a virtual reality master degree, together with the work at my father's place.

    Once all computer related studies finished, I just had clear I didn't want to work with them. I was more attracted to the conceptual questions involved on the language process systems, Turing's universal machine, or any of the other "machine which understands itself" questions, rather than the actual reality of databases or "consultancy" jobs where to inflate nothingness into a graphic presentation for big companies.

    I finally managed to work at Iberia's "Foreign airport's quality service department", which basically involved two big deals:
    -Moving to Madrid and emancipate
    -Traveling as much as ever wanted, both due to work and free flight tickets.

    By this time, I got back to cycling in some different ways, like gravity bikes or commuting.

    During the Madrid years, I got to know many people and many places, which completely redefined my perspectives on things and life, and sent up in a "less is more" mind to an obsessive way, even tried experiments as how small can you make your belongings, to a total of 50. But after any peak, you reach a balance. Why am I going through all this boring thing? because pretty much it's the first seed on what Amaro is now: I had an old MTB which I used to commute, and dreamed of a similar look to the gravity bike I used before, influenced by John Tomac's MTB road bar subconscious image, and resulted as a fixed gear fat slicked mutant I called "Supermotard". I never thought of fixed gear bikes before, but I liked the idea of no cables or any unnecessary thing on the bike. It attracted some attention from magazines and many random people, so I begun to think about making some of those transformations for others, just for the fun of it, not as a business. But this new seed was already growing inside and wanting to improve the supermotard design, but I didn't know how to build bikes.

    Oh boy, now this is going to get really controversial!

    Yes‚ I found a Chinese factory! :o

    Anyway, this factory built in titanium any design you wanted for a good price, and I begun doing some tests and see what happens. I was enjoying this process, so after a while I offered this "service" to anyone who would like to have a frame made to measure, but without charging for it, just to enjoy designing while they payed the manufacturing. Obviously, almost no one came around ;)

    By this time, I went to an Italian friend's family house, close to Bari, to enjoy eastern holidays in pure Italian style. They were not able to say my name, so I was renamed as "Amaro". Then, after an infinite meal and at Limoncino time, the bicycle designing idea was on the table and talking about how could it be and what would be a good name for the bikes, and the father said an impossible to avoid "Gina Lollobrigida". That was it, utterly perfection. The "supermotard" bike had her name.

    Parallel to this, too much traveling with the free flights fried my brain and couldn't cope with the idea of seeing life passing by seated in an office, so I quid and applied for an English over-landing company (Dragoman). After 3 months training at their place on truck mechanics during, customer service and trouble solving situations, I was sent to South America for 18 months, driving an all terrain truck full of passengers looking for "adventure", ending up with 4 full SA loops. Hard job, but so many inputs that you'll never be the same: put the "less is more" background together with living 18 months with all your belongings in a backpack, sleeping in a 70's truck cabin, knowing how people live with even less than that in crazy places at 5000m altitude, etc, and the resulting cocktail is multidimensional.

    During this over-landing period, I suddenly begun to receive emails about the bike designing. I even did some frame designs while on the road having them shipped directly from the Chinese factory, crazy world, so once back "home" after the 18 month contract, I went seriously on the Amaro thing and see what happens. This time was about designing bikes, sponsoring some road riders (even Continental Pro), going to Chinese factories, doing some "stupid" things as racing through the desert with the fixed gear brake-less "supermotard", etc. This time ended up with 73 bikes and many lessons on customer service, wrong designs, running a business on your own, etc. But it was also dreadful as never got real control of the manufacturing process, any mistake was all up to you and more than nothing I was not feeling right about all it, first of all because I had total dependency on the factory, and I was not comfortable with this way of doing things, with such surrealistic situation as having to order something to the other end of the world to do something which is supposed to be "artisanal", and realized I was actually helping the global craziness where nothing cares anymore as soon as you can "think" something which someone, somewhere, will do it for any price, like a "closed box", a "blind" decision, no matter conditions or future consequences, creating "Thinking countries" vs "manufacturing countries". So I ended up in a "that's enough" point and decided to stop accepting orders and try to be honest with myself.

    I tried to learn as much as I could (books, videos, WWW), do TIG homologation courses and got somehow the general basics. Then I spend 1 year's weekends with a former framebuilder of my town, who taught me the real thing. But there's nothing else than practice and practice, so most of those 2 years were cutting/mitering tubes, welding and trying to understand the materials. One of my main objectives was to keep all as small and handmade as possible, for example no hole saws for mitering. This meant much more time consumed and lots of things to learn, but I'm convinced of it being the right way for me and also helped out to keep investment low. Then first prototypes were made for me and some friends, and tested so to find failures, reliability, etc. After those two years, I "opened" doors again to accept orders. Many people still thought I was doing titanium or subcontracting in China, and some questioned why keep the same name "Amaro" as could get customers into doubts, but I thought what Amaro is today comes defined by what it was before and even if they're so different, they're like the person behind, no today's Aimar would exist without all the previous Aimars.

    TODAY, I build TIG welded steel bikes, trying to mount them as complete as possible so to create a coherent and consistent bike, and whenever is possible using components produced as local as possible or somehow related with the artisanal or in-house perspective. I do also like to receive order applications hand written by postal service, as I do not only think is a good way of making sure people take a quality time to think what they want, but also like the feeling of the written paper and "real" physical world away from "share" or "like" new culture where it's too cheap or easy to "say" things without a true meaning on it. I'm finally happy with the way I'm doing all this and feel coherent with myself, still a huge ton left to learn (this week ending up the 57th) but really looking forward to the future as each bike I made is the best lesson learned and every new one is the rewarding pleasure of facing your own skills to improve your previous best. I do sometimes have mirror self-questions about all the superfluousness of all this "special" bicycles thing, but I guess it's a personal endless and continuous confrontation with the absolute zero.

    Hopes for future? Exactly so, being able to be in that future.

    Meanwhile, here is this Smoked Out section, open for any questions, criticisms, or whatever you would like to say.
    My pleasure if I can just give back a half of what I've received from Vsalonistas.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Bilbao
    Posts
    2,672
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Amaro Bikes

    Just as a small attachment for documenting the text, here are some pictures of the bike related moments:
    The Gravity bike:
    Attachment 56122
    The Supermotard:
    Attachment 56123
    The desert race:
    Attachment 56124

    Cheers

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Augusta, GA
    Posts
    840
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Amaro Bikes

    Are those dumbbell weights attached to the BB shell!? The Bellucci 29r, nice! Who makes the fork?
    Thanks, NATE

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Bilbao
    Posts
    2,672
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Amaro Bikes

    Hey Nate

    The gravity set-up is a bit tricky. As the donating frames were usually bmx ones, and speeds were sometimes quite high (with peaks of 100km), it was common practice to flip upside-down the frame so to have some extra mm of length from axle to axle. Then those dumbell weights were attached to the down part (seatpost area) with some bolts and a seatpost, and for the top part a homemade long resting area was done by joining two aluminium squares (like the ones for office shelves) and covering it with some spounge material covered with electric tape or the like, kind of banana style seat but all flat for easy movements, and finally two bmx pegs at the rear axle were used for resting your feet. All high-tech as you can see... ;)

    Many thanks for your kind words about the Bellucci, much appreciated coming from someone like you. For the fork, I guess you mean the FNL 223 one, it's fitted with a On-One fork.

    Cheers

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Middle GA
    Posts
    7,127
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    14 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Amaro Bikes

    I'm generally not a huge fan of the look of the On-One fork, but it works on this bike. This things looks the business!!!

    Dustin Gaddis
    www.MiddleGaEpic.com
    Why do people feel the need to list all of their bikes in their signature?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    arlington heights, ma
    Posts
    824
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Amaro Bikes

    The Lollobrigida is one of my favorite bikes. It definitely influenced a few of my builds!


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    639
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Amaro Bikes

    Quote Originally Posted by Amaro Bikes View Post
    The goldenothingness
    [URL="https://www.flickr.com/photos/amarobikes/26997291776"][/URL
    I really like this picture...

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Bilbao
    Posts
    2,672
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Amaro Bikes

    Alex (the photographer) knows his stuff indeed!

    Cheers

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Bilbao
    Posts
    2,672
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Amaro Bikes

    Amaro Loren JPS, black gold



  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Bilbao
    Posts
    2,672
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Amaro Bikes

    Reality


    Perception

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Bilbao
    Posts
    2,672
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Amaro Bikes

    Thoughts from a tough Cent Cols Challenge Classics debut:

    "All is very good with the Loren, superb!
    I love the ride - difficult to explain exactly, but definitely a more firm, secure handling - and surely an improvement over my last bike!
    And getting used to the ESSAX saddle ;)
    Thanks!"

    Thank you Kristjan

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Posts
    1
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Amaro Bikes

    Hi Aimar, I've just found this forum. This kindda bikes are more apreciated offshore than in Spain. I'm about buying one of yours...
    Regards from Cuenca!

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    worlds biggest island
    Posts
    1,804
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Amaro Bikes

    Aimar, your skills are raising it to the next level. espectacular
    Bill Fernance
    Bicycle Shop Owner
    Part Time Framebuilder
    Bicycle Tragic

  14. #14
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Bilbao
    Posts
    2,672
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Amaro Bikes

    Quote Originally Posted by pedrosagan13 View Post
    Hi Aimar, I've just found this forum. This kindda bikes are more apreciated offshore than in Spain. I'm about buying one of yours...
    Regards from Cuenca!
    Hola, Pedro

    Velocipede Salon is a true www oasis....

    Thanks for your kind words

    Quote Originally Posted by progetto View Post
    Aimar, your skills are raising it to the next level. espectacular
    Hey Bill, thanks a lot for such a compliment, although there's still a long way to go, this is a never ending quest. Thanks again for your kind words, much appreciated

  15. #15
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Bilbao
    Posts
    2,672
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Amaro Bikes

    Amaro Lisi SGBG, the enchanted forest



  16. #16
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Bilbao
    Posts
    2,672
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Amaro Bikes

    Cruxifixtorsion

  17. #17
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Bilbao
    Posts
    2,672
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Amaro Bikes

    Zero Reset


    Chrysolina Graminis

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    5,388
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Amaro Bikes

    Aimar, thank you for sharing this. Can you point me to a little more information about the second organization you've linked to, and the Red Melilla project?

  19. #19
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Bilbao
    Posts
    2,672
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Amaro Bikes

    Quote Originally Posted by 72gmc View Post
    Aimar, thank you for sharing this. Can you point me to a little more information about the second organization you've linked to, and the Red Melilla project?
    Hi,

    "Ongi Etorri Errefuxiatuak" is the local "Welcome Refugees" organization in Bilbao ("Ongi Etorri Errefuxiatuak" is Basque for "Welcome Refugees"), I wanted to also keep a local connection me being from Bilbao. Their "Red Melilla" project is to help refugees and migrant people crossing the Melilla border with Spain, where there's a shameful fence where police and goverment keep failing to respect the European law on human rights (most famous incident being last year's inmigrant people being killed drown by police's rubber bullets to stop them from reaching land. The "Red Melilla" project does make special effort on uncompained minors assistance, letting them know their rights and also as translators so to help them with medical assistance, etc. Afterwards, Ongietorri Errefuxiatuak does also work to relocate refugees in Bilbao, giving them full assistance to their new life, call it how to ask for medical assistance rights, find jobs, house, etc.

    Therefore, the charity bike will raise money for two different sides of the same issue, one half with openarms rescue labour at the mediterranean sea (with many other actions as defending their rights or making this issue visible to the people) and the other half with Ongietorri Errefuxiatuak which works more inland both helping at the Spanish border and relocating refugees in Bilbao.

    Hope it helps to understand a bit better the project. Although there's yet another matter to it, which is to simply make this whole shame visible, we've ended up used to hear all these knews about people being relocated in unhuman conditions at not fully controled camps, dying at the sea, etc, etc, and we should consider just for one second it could just be any of us, if we got unlucky enough as either being born at the "wrong side" of the world, or our country becoming a hell of bomb's war, so trying to find a better place is as human as any of us. Don't let ourselves just look somewhere else.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    5,388
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Amaro Bikes

    Thank you! For the information and your contribution.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. 44 Bikes
    By fortyfour in forum Smoked Out
    Replies: 1160
    Last Post: 11-18-2020, 12:26 PM
  2. S and S bikes here
    By Manumai in forum VSalon Cycling Gallery
    Replies: 34
    Last Post: 08-14-2012, 09:53 AM
  3. Anybody looking for 57 tt bikes?
    By suspectdevice in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 05-18-2012, 08:12 AM
  4. Head bikes or heart bikes?
    By baldbones in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 10-23-2011, 12:11 AM
  5. Fat Bikes, should I?
    By billrick in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 33
    Last Post: 01-10-2011, 01:34 AM

Bookmarks

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •