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Thread: What if cars went bye bye?

  1. #41
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    Default Re: What if cars went bye bye?

    Quote Originally Posted by sk_tle View Post
    As long as you aren't disabled and can ride a bicycle It is quite easy to live without a personnal car actually. This is mostly a motivation and anticipation thing and accepting losing a bit of comfort notably in term of improvisation. Most things end up being ordered online and you can't just decide to rush to the grocery store at the last minute if you are not living in a urban area. You rent a vehicle only when you need it, around here there are even apps to rent other people's cars so you just have to find one in your neighborhood, some will even drive to your place if you need it.

    If you can't accept that, you'd live miserably. Otherwise it is fine. I ditched my car 2 years ago and don't regret it. I rent a car once in a while and I don't have to think about maintenance, depreciation, insurance or even just cleaning it. Having said that I still have a motorbike but even that would be the first thing I would ditch if I had to get rid of one thing.

    Now living in a society that do not allow ajn kind of motorized vehicule, be it rented ones, transport of good or mass transit would be very different. A personnal car ? This is just a luxury.
    Broad strokes, here.

    I lived car free from the age of 18 to 32, but I was living in populated areas where I could easily ride to the store for groceries 1-2 times per week and commute to work by bike year round. I currently live 25km from the nearest grocery store and about 40km from the feed store. We're not in the delivery zone for any grocery service and I don't know of any bikes that can carry a dozen hay bales, 50# bags of feed, or fencing lumber. In an emergency, I'm also a minimum of 30 minutes from the nearest hospital service or police - that's a long time to wait in an emergency (hour round trip for the ambulance to get here and get me/someone else to a hospital).

    In the right circumstances, especially in an urban environment, I think personal cars should be considered obsolete given proper public transit and access to rapid healthcare and the like. That does not account for a huge swath of the population living rural with needs that can't be fulfilled by bicycle.
    "Do you want ants? Because that's how you get ants."

  2. #42
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    Default Re: What if cars went bye bye?

    Quote Originally Posted by Bewheels View Post
    This is an interesting thread to bring up considering 12 months ago nearly all car traffic stopped immediately (country by country).
    So in a way we know what can happen, how people are impacted, and what changes have needed to happen.
    12 months ago, I was commuting on light rail a lot of the time.
    I hung my fixed gear on a hook on the train.
    I got to read books or listen to podcasts or jazz a lot then.
    I got to meet interesting people that I would not have run across otherwise.
    I had to give it up because of Covid, and I drive to work now.
    I hope to get back to the trains before long.
    The people on the train are much more fun to be around than are all the a$$holes on the road who can now drive over 100 mph whenever they want.
    Mark Walberg
    Building bike frames for fun since 1973.

  3. #43
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    Default Re: What if cars went bye bye?

    Quote Originally Posted by Octave View Post
    Broad strokes, here.

    I lived car free from the age of 18 to 32, but I was living in populated areas where I could easily ride to the store for groceries 1-2 times per week and commute to work by bike year round. I currently live 25km from the nearest grocery store and about 40km from the feed store. We're not in the delivery zone for any grocery service and I don't know of any bikes that can carry a dozen hay bales, 50# bags of feed, or fencing lumber. In an emergency, I'm also a minimum of 30 minutes from the nearest hospital service or police - that's a long time to wait in an emergency (hour round trip for the ambulance to get here and get me/someone else to a hospital).

    In the right circumstances, especially in an urban environment, I think personal cars should be considered obsolete given proper public transit and access to rapid healthcare and the like. That does not account for a huge swath of the population living rural with needs that can't be fulfilled by bicycle.
    This very same population lived before the cars.

    Back in the days there were more local stores in rural areas. They have been deserted because cars made all the big commercial zone accessible to people living in remote area and they stopped supporting their local community. If we had to live care free you would see more of these poping again in rural areas because they would be profitable again. Delivery service would also adapt, if not to your door at least to a more local commerce nearby.
    Last edited by sk_tle; 03-03-2021 at 11:20 AM.
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  4. #44
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    Default Re: What if cars went bye bye?

    I'm 30 minutes from the closest grocery, 3 hours from Phoenix, 2 hours from Flagstaff, and 2 hours from Las Vegas. There isn't public transportation that I can use to shop or that delivers groceries to my address. I choose to live where I do, I get that, but assumptions based on the nation as being a homogenous entity are not accurate. It's like raising gas taxes, that hurts the working poor and rural folks who rely on their cars to get to work.

    When I was stationed in Hawaii, I bike commuted every day. 26 miles round trip in all weather, rain or shine. In almost three years, I drove to work just a handful of times, most of that was when my hand had sutures. I had panniers and would shop on the way home, it was a simple existence and I miss it.
    Weight Doper

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