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Thread: Weekday-Training Bike (with a Trailer!) Design

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    Default Weekday-Training Bike (with a Trailer!) Design

    I have been riding more and more, and finding certain bottlenecks in my schedule that I'd like to relieve. My schedule is such that after work I like to get out and do something active for 30-60min. I go for a run, but would rather go for a bike ride, however my wife likes me take our 2yr old out of the house so she can get some peace for a little while - usually that means a run with the jogging stroller.

    So I've been thinking.

    First, only child bike trailer I can find is the Burly, that attaches on the rear stay. Seems to work okay, do you guys think it would put undue stress on the frame (Cannondale CAAD9)? That would obviously be the cheapest route.

    Or, if you were going to build a trailer for a small child, how would it be? Seems to me something that used the same wheels & tires as the road bike would be handy and smoother. Would you design a bike differently if you knew it was going to have a trailer attached.

    And I am not talking about some slow moving cruiser. I want a bike that is built for going fast, with an efficient riding position - just pulling a little extra resistance!

    Thanks for your thoughts.

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    Default Re: Weekday-Training Bike (with a Trailer!) Design

    Quote Originally Posted by jsrieck View Post
    I have been riding more and more, and finding certain bottlenecks in my schedule that I'd like to relieve. My schedule is such that after work I like to get out and do something active for 30-60min. I go for a run, but would rather go for a bike ride, however my wife likes me take our 2yr old out of the house so she can get some peace for a little while - usually that means a run with the jogging stroller.

    So I've been thinking.

    First, only child bike trailer I can find is the Burly, that attaches on the rear stay. Seems to work okay, do you guys think it would put undue stress on the frame (Cannondale CAAD9)? That would obviously be the cheapest route.

    Or, if you were going to build a trailer for a small child, how would it be? Seems to me something that used the same wheels & tires as the road bike would be handy and smoother. Would you design a bike differently if you knew it was going to have a trailer attached.

    And I am not talking about some slow moving cruiser. I want a bike that is built for going fast, with an efficient riding position - just pulling a little extra resistance!

    Thanks for your thoughts.
    I have a trailer. adams explorer that I snagged off of craigslist. When I'm out pulling the baby around I find it's best to forget about being a bike racer and trying to train so I just enjoy the ride/experience of it. As for the stresses of pulling a trailer? I put some cut up innertube on the clamp to protect the bike from marring. that's about it.

    I didn't really address your question, but watch your local craigslist for deals. I got mine for $80.
    The desired effect is what you get when you improve your interplanetary funkmanship, Francis.

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    Default Re: Weekday-Training Bike (with a Trailer!) Design

    There is a different mount for the Burly that attaches at the QR. Use that instead of that plastic contraption on the stays.

    That said, I have always chosen to put the kid on the bike. Kid prefers it, I prefer it. We had a Burly trailer that my wife was going to use, but it never saw much use.

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    Default Re: Weekday-Training Bike (with a Trailer!) Design

    Get the QR mount if you can. It works even with Breezer style hooded dropouts. I've been getting out with my daughter as often as I can and don't have any major complaints about the Burley we've been using. If you get out of the saddle for some hard climbing, the trailer arm flexes and springs back and gets into a cycle that's almost perfectly opposite of my climbing rhythm. Just a little extra resistance I suppose.

    If you have an older model where the side bars wrap around from front to back, just watch it when you're going around something that's firmly in the ground. If you hit things with the trailer, it can stop you dead and can be shocking for the little one in the trailer.
    Sean Chaney
    www.vertigocycles.com
    a peek behind the curtain

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    Default Re: Weekday-Training Bike (with a Trailer!) Design

    +1 for the QR mount. 2 y/o is big enough for the trailer but getting too big to carry on the bike. Put some books/toys and snacks back there are you are good to go. More than an hour gets to be too long for many kids (or at least it was for mine--now ages 9 and 6 and riding their own multi-geared bikes with me) Speed with a trailer will be limited to less than 15-18 miles per hour, less if the road is rough. Any hills become much more difficult with a trailer. Don't look at it as "training", but rather as a chance to get a nice short ride in that you might otherwise have missed.

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    Default Re: Weekday-Training Bike (with a Trailer!) Design

    I towed both my kids, now 6 and 11, for two years plus each. Bought a Trek trailer, which was made by Chariot, I think, and towed them behind my Breezer in Central Park. Packed them in with pillows and stuffed animals, plenty of snacks and a few sippy-cups, and they were content for two hours or more. Usually they slept, and I had a great workout. In the winter I put them in a snow suit, bundled them with blankets and the occasional hot water bottle, and they were happy as clams. I preferred using a mountain bike because the brakes and gearing were better suited to the task. I just asked my daughter whether she had fun, and she said she loved it. C

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