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Thread: Thomson X2 Stem Breakage ???

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    Default Thomson X2 Stem Breakage ???

    I would like to add one of these (Thomson X2 Road Stem) to my bike but I have found many "reports" of the face plates breaking. Anyone have any experience with their faceplates breaking/cracking? Thanks for the input.
     

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    Quote Originally Posted by bikeasaurus View Post
    I would like to add one of these (Thomson X2 Road Stem) to my bike but I have found many "reports" of the face plates breaking. Anyone have any experience with their faceplates breaking/cracking? Thanks for the input.
    i cracked one on my 1-speed mtb, but it had 28" bars & lasted a few years.........noticed they kept rotating down. likely not it's fault. you gotta check your steering stuff every so often, yo. stuff only lasts so long.
    Steve Garro, Coconino Cycles.
    Frames & Bicycles built to measure and Custom wheels
    Hecho en Flagstaff, Arizona desde 2003
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    properly installed they are perfect.
    shrink, terrorist, poet, president of concerned cyclists for the abolishment of bovine source bicycle parts and head of the disaffected commie dishwashers union.

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    Yep, torque wrench is your friend.
     

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    I don't think there is anything wrong with them. Folks need to pay attention to gaps and read the instructions. Seriously.

    1. Check your bar / stem interface for flaws.
    2. Clean and apply light grease to threads before installing all bolts finger tight and VISUALLY adjust all gaps to even.
    3. Tighten slowly in an "X" pattern.
    4. Only tighten enough to do the job and not more than spec. "Enough" is enough so to speak.

    What SteveG said, "stuff only lasts so long". These parts are bloody light my brother and that comes with a cost. We could be having this conversation about almost any removable faceplace stem.

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    I have used these for years with no problems whatsoever.
     

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    Get a torque key and use it. It takes a lot less torque than you'd think to hold the bars. I know some think the design is intrinsically flawed, but I've never seen a properly installed one break.

     

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    its not even a torque issue so much as crimping down on corner and losing that little gap that should be equal all the way around the face plate.
    the cracked one's i've seen were that way because the plate pushing into the stem in one corner.

    atmo.
    shrink, terrorist, poet, president of concerned cyclists for the abolishment of bovine source bicycle parts and head of the disaffected commie dishwashers union.

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    Quote Originally Posted by swoop View Post
    its not even a torque issue so much as crimping down on corner and losing that little gap that should be equal all the way around the face plate.
    the cracked one's i've seen were that way because the plate pushing into the stem in one corner.

    atmo.
    good effin point. . . self-wrenching does require a degree of common sense. The times I've fucked things up on my own have invariably been Homer-esque (not the poet, but the sage).
     

  10. #10
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    Get an X4.

    I had an X2 for 3 years and didn't break it. I run a 48mm nitto bar and I'm a fucking gorilla on my bike. If I can't break it, you can't break it.


    -dk
     

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    The even-ness (and x-pattern) is not a question for the x-2 which only two bolts. I torqued them to spec and broke my face plate. Even gap top and bottom. No way to prove that I did it wrong (or right), and reading about torque spec differences with greased/threadlocked/bare bolts I very well could have. My seatpost lasted for many years. My stem lasted 2. It's a good looking part.
     

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    I'm not in the same league as the previous posters, but I had one break. I'm a decent wrench, not a gorilla mechanic/rider, followed suggestions mentioned above, and had the break occur apparently between rides. I.e., finished a hard up hill one ride, no problem after the hill or the last mile, started my next ride and noticed the HB was loose, stopped to tighten the screws and saw one of the faceplate columns had cracked. Sent it to Thomson, got a free replacement in a couple of days, was told after analysis that I'd over torqued it. Whatever. I love the seatposts, and have a mountain stem and one of the older beefy road stems on of a couple of bikes, but won't be using a x2 again. I'm just not into stems that fail for any reason, including "over torquing". Send me a PM if you're looking for a new 100-110mm in silver or black. I'm no longer a believer so will part with any of my collection cheaply.
    Minstrie.
     

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by spopepro View Post
    My stem lasted 2. It's a good looking part.
    that's about it for a light part if you ride allot. it did it's job. i cracked a faceplate & bent a seat post and both were warrentied quickly & cheerfully. that's the best you can ask for. if it would last forever it would be so heavy that no one would want one.
    Steve Garro, Coconino Cycles.
    Frames & Bicycles built to measure and Custom wheels
    Hecho en Flagstaff, Arizona desde 2003
    www.coconinocycles.com
    www.coconinocycles.blogspot.com

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    Default road & cross

    I've used one briefly on my road bike for the latter part of this season with NO issues, and I used one on my cross bike for the first part of this season with NO issues.
    -Jeff

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    Interesting that an X2 is considered light around these parts. Even a relatively pedestrian Ritchey WCS is considerably lighter.
     

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    I had an X2 for about 2 years. It cracked ...
    I missed the hairline crack. Kelly pointed it out to me from 10 yards away.

    Thompson gladly replaced it with a X4 ....

    In retrospect, the X2 was a bad choice for me ...
    component weight should be my last consideration.
    The Definitive Performance Wrap
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    Quote Originally Posted by spopepro View Post
    torque spec differences with greased/threadlocked/bare bolts I very well could have.
    This is an interesting one. I often read advice to grease the threads on things and it makes a whole lot of sense if you ever want to take it off again but the torque specs are nonsense then.

  18. #18
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    On the one I had, the face plate was too big. It cracked, replaced free of charge. Put me off a bit.
     

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    sidenote question: what impact does greasing the threads (on any part, basically) have on torque spec (or rather, torque applied)? thanks.

    Quote Originally Posted by AntLockyer View Post
    This is an interesting one. I often read advice to grease the threads on things and it makes a whole lot of sense if you ever want to take it off again but the torque specs are nonsense then.
     

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    Quote Originally Posted by AntLockyer View Post
    This is an interesting one. I often read advice to grease the threads on things and it makes a whole lot of sense if you ever want to take it off again but the torque specs are nonsense then.
    Hey I'll answer this one and to the other fellow who broke a faceplate after torquing to spec.

    You only need to tighten "enough". The spec. is a target and the object is NOT to hit that number only to not exceed it. Bars are never the same exact diameter or roundness and the insides of stems (GASP) are not perfect. These are freakin' LIGHT parts not drill presses!!! Look at what you are doing and tighten slowly and test with your body weight.

    Some torque specs are stated with and some without grease. Regardless, you need to use your hands, eyes and ears to do a proper job. Over torqueing is very common.

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