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Thread: Things That Last - An appreciation

  1. #1
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    Default Things That Last - An appreciation

    This under-saddle pack was purchased circa '91 or '92 and originally mounted under the "Tusk" Turbo saddle on my MB-0.

    [url=https://flic.kr/p/2msFCVo]

    I've been using it on one bike or another for the better part of 30 years.

    It was made with Cordura and an inner tube. There is something poetic about using a tube to carry a tube.

    The design was not the most efficient in terms of access, but once mounted it was super secure. The tube gave the pack some stretch and malleability, which made it stable and rattle-free at a time when most packs were none of the above.

    Noticed tonight that the tube became brittle and cracked. RIP.

    Which invites the question: What are some cycling products that have given you 30+ years?

    Silca pump?
    Campy something?

    Whatchagot?

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    Default Re: Things That Last - An appreciation

    I have two Specialized waterbottle cages made of injection molded plastic. Specialized called them their ultralight "composite" model even though I believe they pre-dated carbon fiber cages. I bought them in my poor-man's weight weenie days. I think their claimed weight was 34g. One blue, One red. In approximately 30 years I've never lost a bottle from them. I even painted them white to match my current bike. They just won't die.

    Bike - 1.jpeg

    Same holds true for the bottle cages on my sport touring bike. Blackburn ATB cages. Basic aluminum. I thought sooner or later they'd crack like my other cages. Right now it looks like later.

    Also, Bullseye hubs. Have them on the front of two bikes. Probably outlive me. Had the world not gone to cassettes and 1000 cogs, I'd still have them on the rear, too.

    Bike - 2.jpeg

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    Default Re: Things That Last - An appreciation

    Quote Originally Posted by TTX1 View Post
    Which invites the question: What are some cycling products that have given you 30+ years?
    Given me 30+ years? I got nothing...

    Given cycling 30+ years - I'd say the original Flite saddle is up there; and I do at least have a couple of those in use at the moment. Does that count?!

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    Default Re: Things That Last - An appreciation

    Lots of stuff. I love stuff that lasts and lasts…especially the stuff that still looks good years later. I was just thinking a little while ago how incredibly dependable the old lighting system on my camper is. Modern lights are light years better for efficiency and brightness, but this setup is ALWAYS available and never fails.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    "Humilis humilibus...Inflectans arroganibus....."

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    Default Re: Things That Last - An appreciation

    "Buy the best and cry once." -Gene Berg
    steve cortez

    FNG

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    Default Re: Things That Last - An appreciation

    Quote Originally Posted by zetroc View Post
    "Buy the best and cry once." -Gene Berg
    Buy nice or buy twice
    La Cheeserie!

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    Default Re: Things That Last - An appreciation

    I've been using my SSM Regal saddle for most of the last 27years, I try a new saddle then revert back...I'm no longer trying new saddles now.
    Riding has to be fun, and part of the fun has to be that you’re not worried about having too much technology on your bike. - Tom Ritchey

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    Default Re: Things That Last - An appreciation

    Quote Originally Posted by Sascha Roszak View Post
    I've been using my SSM Regal saddle for most of the last 27years, I try a new saddle then revert back...I'm no longer trying new saddles now.
    Every bike but the MTB has a Regal. The oldest is about 20 years old now.
    Weight Doper

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    Default Re: Things That Last - An appreciation

    A Blacburn minipump - probably not 30 years, but definitely over 20, maybe 25 (?)
    Accompanies me on every ride, still looks new, used many, many times.

    And some Flite saddles I have lying around.

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    Default Re: Things That Last - An appreciation

    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Polack View Post

    ...Also, Bullseye hubs. Have them on the front of two bikes. Probably outlive me. Had the world not gone to cassettes and 1000 cogs, I'd still have them on the rear, too.

    Bike - 2.jpeg
    Holy moly, I had a pair of those. And a Bullseye crank to boot - huge welds, white paint which started flaking off the same day I bought it. There was nothing about Bullseye in the late 1980's that couldn't have been technologically accomplished in the late 1880's, but that stuff lasted forever. And weighed a s&*t metric ton.

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    Default Re: Things That Last - An appreciation

    buy proper shoes. apart from being comfortable, and long lasting (you can resole them several times) they go down rather well with the ladies. If I recall. A lady will look at you from the ground up.

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    Default Re: Things That Last - An appreciation

    IMG_20200910_095800.jpg

    I don't know anything about these bottom brackets but they were cheap and we put them in every tandem we built (ca 1991) that weren't going to the town dentists (they probably got Phil). Heavy as $%#$ and indestructible.

    This one went in an abandoned department store mountain bike before donation to the co-op last year.
    Zuzu’s pedals

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    Default Re: Things That Last - An appreciation

    The old Fosters size SON dyno hub, started using it with ye olde E6 incandescent lamps,
    now on the 6th generation light, an IQ-X.

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    Default Re: Things That Last - An appreciation

    I have a black Silca floor pump that is at least 30 years old, and have been using it regularly. Have to say, though, I just picked up a new Silca Pista Plus floor pump on an impulse buy when I saw one at ATA Cycles in Concord, Mass a few weeks ago. Which makes me think of the reason for that trip down to Concord: to help my wife's uncle work on his downsizing project, by bringing home a canoe. A canoe that belonged to my wife's grandfather, then her uncle, and now she has it. So three generations have owned this beautiful wood and canvas Old Town canoe, built in Maine in 1925. So on its 96th year. And it's still a thing of beauty. Got it on the water last weekend.
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    Default Re: Things That Last - An appreciation

    Dura Ace 740X and 7700 components. Despite the relative incompatibility of 740x shifty bits with anything outside the 740X Universe, this stuff simply Will Not Give Up.
    Have some combination of 740X/7700 on four bikes, each one gorgeous and a true joy to ride. Example:

    PC266170 by Doc Mertes, on Flickr

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    Default Re: Things That Last - An appreciation

    1999 Campagnolo Chorus road groupset

    Purchased with my IF Crown J still riding the derailleur mostly off-road. Probably ridden across Spain 8 times with the aforementioned derailleur 1,200 kilometers a pop all on dirt after retiring from road service.


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    Default Re: Things That Last - An appreciation

    Crashing at Mt. Snow in 1988:



    Out for a ride in summer 2016:



    Same Fisher Rhino stem and Deore XT brake levers and friction shifters. Literally everything else on that bike has been replaced, including the frame and fork.

    Still going strong today, but that bike's seeing only lighter duty now.

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    Default Re: Things That Last - An appreciation

    Bikewise...hmm, well, the Trek 750 hybrid I bought in 1995 and gave to my best friend in 2005 is probably the oldest bike thing that I know is still going (though tbh, much of that has to do with how little my friend rides it since I gave it to him). But that's only 26 years.

    Non-bikewise, I have a small Polytone MiniBrute III combo amplifier that I bought new in 1980 and still gets used all the time. And my Steinberger L-2 bass guitar that I got new as a college graduation gift will be 40 years old next year, and despite being used on tours and sessions all over the world for decades it's still good-as-new, and will probably outlive all of us. Last thing standing after nuclear armageddon will be cockroaches, Keith Richards, and Steinberger L-2 composite bass guitars.

    Edit: Oh, wait, I have a WagnerWare "Dutch Oven" cooking pot that belonged to my grandmother, must be at least 70 or 80 years old, I use that weekly. Unkillable.

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    Default Re: Things That Last - An appreciation

    Non bike wise I've got some Patagonia clothing and gear that is 35+ years old.

    SPP
    My name is Peter Miller.

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    Default Re: Things That Last - An appreciation

    Another data point for the old Silca floor pump. Mine's from 1975. Silk tubulars, 26" mountain bike tires, rubber rafts, my vanagon, this pump's seen it all and it's still smiling. Oh, okay, I replaced the leather washer. Cut a circle out of an old belt I got at goodwill. Serviceability is part of durability.

    Remember the "laminated-knit" Pearl Izumi clothing of the early 80s? Different fiber on the two sides of the fabric, so you got ridiculous durability outside and soft comfort inside. I have a nylon-cotton jersey and a pair of nylon-wool winter tights. Can't kill 'em.

    Second on the Patagonia stuff, I think he designs most of those items with the idea that you'll eventually put them in your will, doesn't he? But that canoe takes the cake! Absolutely beautiful.

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