User Tag List

Likes Likes:  0
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 22

Thread: OT: Cookware and Knives

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Vienna, Virginia
    Posts
    2,610
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default OT: Cookware and Knives

    Well I hav decided to slowly replace my 23 year old Calphalon cookware, as the anondization is gone in many places. I am thinking of venturing away from the aluminum pieces.

    How are people's experiences with other quality cookware, such as all-clad, le creuset etc.

    My Henkel's knives are also 23 years old. I was thinking of buying one all around ceramic blade. Any thoughts?
    life is too short to drink bad wine....

    Stuart Levy
    0
     

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    mamby pamby land
    Posts
    500
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Send your pots back to calphalon they will replace them for free. Ceramic is to brittle for everyday use, think big guy on zipp 202's. just my thoughts
    "SHUT UP LEGS"
    0
     

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    1,068
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    I like all clad works well and cleans up nicely. I had Calphalon and was never really crazy about it. Unless you've had them over sharpened the knives are fine,my favorite go to knife is a 10" Henckels chef knife that is at least that old. I haven't played with the ceramic stuff much though and new kitchen gadgets are more fun than new bike gadgets..well as fun anyway. Have fun. Frank
    Frank Beshears

    The gentlest thing in the world
    overcomes the hardest thing in the world.
    0
     

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Metro DC area
    Posts
    389
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Znfdl -

    Try contacting John Borg at www.knifemerchant.com -- I have bought multiple knives from him over the years, and his advice is excellent! I have an assortment of Wustof, Henkels, Global, and others (Granton slicer or two), but have never tried any of the ceramic knives. MANY years ago, I cooked for a living, and still have a passion for fine knives and equipment. Most of my knives are between 10 and 20 years old, and have plenty of life left on their blades. The Knife Merchant has always been my go-to source for knives and other kitchen tools.

    As for pots, I also have an ecletic mix, but mostly All-Clad and Caphalon. Never sprung for copper - I guess I save the cash for bike stuff.

    Anyways, just some thoughts. Sure you'll get lots of advice, as it seems that many of us share the passion for both fine bicycles and riding as well as culinary rewards! Keep us posted what you end up with.
     
    0
     

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Vienna, Virginia
    Posts
    2,610
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by redturbo View Post
    Send your pots back to calphalon they will replace them for free.
    Thanks, I just sent a message to calphalon customer service.

    Thanks for the lead on the knives. Looks like a great website.

    I remeber fondly of cooking with cast iron during college and gradiuate school. The cast iron pots and pan's went with my ex-gf. I am thinking of getting a cast iron wok. I figure let that baby heat up for 5 minites and then cook with it.
    life is too short to drink bad wine....

    Stuart Levy
    0
     

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Arlington, VA
    Posts
    915
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Znfndl -- are the henkels knives actually shot? Sometimes a good knife sharpener can do a great deal to revive a knife -- there are such people around.

    Henkels, Wustoff, Sabatier, and others have good knives. Weighting and handles are all a little different and it might pay to try to heft one or two or three chefs knives to see what you might like over the next 23 years. If you like the feel of one of the big brands, you can probably find a deal on a useful kit that's no more expensive than a single good chef's knife. That could be augmented with one or two select things from any maker you like as you figure out what's missing from the main offerings (missing, as in, you really miss it).

    See what calphalon will do for you. For new, I think that allclad are pretty good. Le Creuset I think of more for a couple of odd pieces -- a casserole, dutch over, what have you. I'd rather have an all metal pan for my daily go-to pan.
     
    0
     

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Metro DC area
    Posts
    389
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Just another thought Znfdl - As some have pointed out, your knives may have sig life left. Try La Cuisine in Old Town Alexandria (www.lacuisineus.com), who have an excellent knife sharpening/repair service.

    We had a house guest once who used my boning knife to open a can (OMG!!), and chipped out a section of the blade. It was all I could do to restrain myself from a sharp blow to his head when I saw the damage! Anyways, took it to La Cuisine and they ground it down enough to repair the blade. I lost years of life off the blade as they had to grind it pretty far, but it was repaired nonetheless.

    Course if you've decided that you simply MUST have new knives, why not?!?
     
    0
     

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
    Posts
    156
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    I prefer Japanese knives over German ones. I have Shun knives and they are pretty great. MAC knives are also very good - if they are good enough for Thomas Keller, they are certainly good enough for me.

    For pans.... All-Clad is very good for the easily available brands. Lodge makes some nice cast iron cookware if you don't care about looks.
    Lynskey R210 Ultegra | Miyata 1000
    0
     

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Cannon County TN
    Posts
    5,733
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    I use 100-year old cast iron (have 12-piece collection of same mark) with a couple of SS saucepans. Eventually will get a few pieces of copper.

    Sharpen my own knives with Edge Pro Apex apparatus. http://edgeproinc.com/
    I find German/Swiss/Japan/USA metal at garage sales and make 'em like new-only cheaper.

    You can have Mom's cast iron wok--it's too heavy for her to use and has been hanging in a peg for about ten years. It's a "Lodge" and they are massive.

    Ceramic-sure if you've got a double for each knife to use every time you have to send it back to maker for sharpening. YES I have a ceramic folding knife. Too brittle for field work, but might survive a cutting-board-only application a bit better. Steel is more forgiving and easier to fix.





    0
     

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
    Posts
    156
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by WadePatton View Post
    I use 100-year old cast iron (have 12-piece collection of same mark) with a couple of SS saucepans. Eventually will get a few pieces of copper.

    Sharpen my own knives with Edge Pro Apex apparatus. http://edgeproinc.com/
    I find German/Swiss/Japan/USA metal at garage sales and make 'em like new-only cheaper.

    You can have Mom's cast iron wok--it's too heavy for her to use and has been hanging in a peg for about ten years. It's a "Lodge" and they are massive.
    Old cast-iron is the best. panman.com sells old, but great Griswolds. If you want to get obsessive about cookware, there is a long post over at eGullet about the physics of cookware and how to match it up to the type of cooking you do.
    Lynskey R210 Ultegra | Miyata 1000
    0
     

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Brant Lake, New York
    Posts
    16
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Znfdl,
    I've been a cook, chef and everything in between for almost 20 years. I have used many knife brands over the years. My best advice is to try out a few brands and see what works for you in terms of comfort, personal preference and price. I wouldn't buy an entire knife set though. They tend to have a few pieces you will hardly ever use or need. I prefer choosing the best knife for a specific job and you'd get to sample each brand as well.

    I would also stay away from ceramic blades. They are brittle and once it cracks it's finished. I do like brands like Wusthof, F.Dick, Messermeister, Sabatier, Masahiro, Global, Forschner. They are all nice.

    Good knife skills are key. I've used a cheap carbon Chinese cleaver at work for years. I just found it satisfying in teaching externs, kids, budding cooks you don't need to spend a lot of money on knives but learning how to properly dice, brunoise, julienne with anything is very important.

    If you are looking for something bespoke check out www.stapelknives.com. I emailed him years back about having a chef's knife made. He was great to work with, very prompt in answering emails, questions, etc. and a very good resource in knife making. I wound up purchasing a sashimi knife he was working on for himself. I was getting married at the time and he offered to sell it to me. It was $650 but the thing is *@!#ing outrageous. He can make anything you want. Check out his stuff.....

    With that said, learning how to properly sharpen your blades is the most important thing you can do. I can't tell you how many times I would cook at peoples houses and come across dangerously dull knives. If you find it a daunting task, find a good shop that will sharpen them for you. Just make sure they don't grind the hell out of the blades. My personal work knives are mixed-n-matched, cheapo's that I can beat on and not worry about but I keep them all sharp! They've served me well for years.

    As far as pots n pans, I use All Clad, Staub and Le Creuset. I've found them to be bombproof. Again, don't buy a set but pick the ones you think you'd use the most. I wouldn't skimp in this area. Stick with a good brand.
    I'd stay away from anything copper. It looks nice and conducts heat well but its expensive and a pain to keep clean. Avoid anything non-stick period, yuck.

    Hope this helps ya.
    Bonk
     
    0
     

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    La Jolla, Ca.
    Posts
    968
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    A funny ting happened to me at the Handbuilt Bicycle Show in San Jose a couple of years ago. As I headed to the bar to look for DBRK and other pals I walked through a ballroom where Berghoff pots, pans, etc. was being sold in a road show format. It was love at first sight so I bought more of their wonderful stainless things than two of me will ever need but the set was about half the price of individual items so it worked out fine.

    I had Calphalon Hard Anodized before. The worked ok on my old coiled-wire electric range but the exteriors were hard to clean. The cleaning issue didn't bother me but it made Leslie crazy 'cuz I cook and she cleans up.

    We remodeled and installed a smooth-top range. Uh-Oh- the rounded bottoms of the Calphalons are not too stable and don't maintain good and efficient contact with the flat range. The Berghoff answered all my pan problems. (I was going to write "pot problems" but thought better of it). They are made of surgical stainless and clean very easily. The bottoms are a triple layer of metals that seems to do a great job of evenly distributing heat. Some of the pans have waffled bottoms which works great for pan-grilling meat. The tops seal like they are vacuumed to the pots so waterless cooking veggies is easy.

    I have a couple of Cuisineart Teflon fry pans for stuff like eggs, etc.

    I gave the set of Calphalon to a gal-pal with a gas stove and she and her fiance love them. The rounded bottoms sit just fine over a gas burner. They both like to cook and the anodized pans allow pan de-glazing, browning, and other techniques that don't work so well with Teflon pans. I wish I had gas myself but it would have been a big hassle/expense to run a gas line where none had been before.

    Uncle Kenny's words of wisdom: consider how the pans you are considering will work on your range. Do you care if the exterior has stains no matter what you do to clean them?
    Do you care about waterless cooking potential? Can you really afford these things? Can you really afford to keep replacing inferior cooking utensiles? Won't one medium Teflon fry pan cover all your non-stick needs? If you drink enough RED does any of the other stuff really matter?
     
    0
     

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    306
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    I just got a Kyocera ceramic knife set for Christmas. Collectively, they're the most useful tool I've ever had in the kitchen and are insanely sharp and are supposed to have extremely long life. Plus, I found that when the dull I can send back to Kyocera and they will sharpen for free.
     
    0
     

  14. #14
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    DC
    Posts
    24,292
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    19 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Cast iron gets lots of service in this house. You might have a prob. teaching your fam. to not wash them ;) Also, commercial stainless steel pans are wonderful...nice smooth surface you can do wonders. An AMAZING pan that I'll never give up is my Sitram Cybernox Stainless. This pan is "almost" non stick...well any good pan is "almost" non stick if you heat it properly before use however this goes beyond that...they do something special to the metal. They are pricey, I took a chance and am super happy:
    http://www.amazon.com/Sitram-Cyberno...2393556&sr=8-2

    I bought my first new chef's knife in many many yrs. recently and got a wustof grand prix and love it alot, can't imagine anything better really. I'm used to that blade shape size and style of handle so I'd prolly cut my thumb off using a Shun!!!
    0
     

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Vienna, Virginia
    Posts
    2,610
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    This is such an awesome place to get all kinds of information.

    I should have been more clear. My in-laws with my family and my mother in-law has started to sharpen my knives on an electric sharpener and did a less than under whelming job, which angered me quite a bit. She is late 70s and does not take criticism well. I think that I will bring my collection of knives to a professional knife sharpener to try to restore the knives to their original sharpness. Sharpening will then be off limits. I figured that if I got one or two ceramic knives, I could declare these off limits as well. I think I will go the re-sharpening route first.

    I also need to get some off limit pots, as she has done a number on some of my non-stick calphalon fry pans, e.g. metal utensils on a non-stick surface. Cast Iron would be to heavy for her to use :)

    I ike the idea of sending my hard anondized pots back to Calphalon for my stock pot and large sauce pans.

    The items of most need are a french oven, wok and a pan to braise and then bake.

    This is all great information. Thanks.
    life is too short to drink bad wine....

    Stuart Levy
    0
     

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Sunny Florida
    Posts
    58
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bonkmeister View Post
    Znfdl,
    Good knife skills are key. I've used a cheap carbon Chinese cleaver at work for years. I just found it satisfying in teaching externs, kids, budding cooks you don't need to spend a lot of money on knives but learning how to properly dice, brunoise, julienne with anything is very important.
    I am also "in the biz" and would strongly agree wtih Bonk. Everything said, especially the cleaver. It doesn't get much simpler. When we're doing commercial applications it's all about ensuring that the equipment is working at volume.

    Much similar to racing...gotta go cook. bye.

    Joel
     
    0
     

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    36
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    I am also in the biz. I have been a cook now chef for 20 yrs. We use a lot of cast iron at work and at home. My mother in law had a nice collection of Griswold and Wagner that I have slowly inherited. We use some stainless for sauce, stock, and non reactive cooking. We use heavy French iron pans that cost about $18 a pop for meat, eggs, some saute(although the saute gets a little heavy in them every night.) They can be found at www.JBPrince.com. We all use Japanese knifes--Mac, Misono(only the Swedish carbon steel), Masahiro.
    You can get them at Korin.com or Knifemerchant. I like the carbon steel because it is easier to keep a nice edge on them. The carbon is not stainless, but some is a bit softer and you have to sharpen it often. Although it doesn't retain its edge as readily as ss like Wusthof or Henckels you can get it sharper.
    I also like Le Crueset for various slow cooking applications but it is spendy.
    Mikeyp
     
    0
     

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    La Jolla, Ca.
    Posts
    968
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Potential bad news about those in-law-sharpened knives. It is possible to overheat the blade on a grinder and ruin the temper so they will never hold a good edge again. I suppose if that happened you'd have little to lose if you tried to re-temper them yourself.
     
    0
     

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    724
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)

    Default

    i have wustoff classic chef and boning knives. they are great. i will admit to lusting after the shun knives but the wustoff stuff lasts forever.

    the advice to test drive these things is right on point. for example, i can't stand global knives. most people seem to love the bourdain advertised beasts but they don't fit my hands. the shun knives feel so right to me but dumping the wustoff junk seems like jumping out of a perfectly good airplane. why do i want to do this?
     
    0
     

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    1,759
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bonkmeister View Post
    Znfdl,
    Avoid anything non-stick period
    Agreed. I got rid of all of my teflon coated and aluminum stuff years ago. I strictly use cast iron and stainless. You can do anything with good cast iron. Stove to oven and back and will last forever. Images of my perfect weekend omlette to come.
    noah
     
    0
     

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •