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Thread: Honjo Fenders and Roof Racks

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    Default Honjo Fenders and Roof Racks

    In light of the fact that the rainy season (it generally runs October-June) is upon us here in Pacific Northwest my Hampsten Classic recently returned to its birthplace to be fitted with a fancy set of Honjo fenders. They look fantastic, but I ran into a problem immediately when my lovely girlfriend stopped by The Towers to pick it up. The crucial extra length in the front that makes them so damn nice to ride with also interferes with the roof rack on my car. Now Max was nice enough to help her wedge my 64cm bike into the back seat of our 2-door Volkswagen Golf, but thatís not a good long-term solution for the car or the bike, not to mention a massive pita.

    Given the recent surge in popularity of metal fenders, I canít be the only person who has this problem. As a group, the group has often come up with some clever solutions to problems like this, so I call on your collective cycling knowledge; how do you get your fendered bikes on racks?

    If it matters, I have a Rocky Mounts Laredo, but I imagine the problem would be similar for any Yakima/Thule rack of a similar design where you take the front wheel out.

    Thanks in advance for the help.
     

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    I have the same issue with my Davidson (Berthoud fenders). I've considered the short tray version of the fork mount rack. It would eliminate any tray interference but I'm not sure I can get the roof bars far enough apart to make it work. On the Honda Element the rack feet mount in specific locations. My bike is a 61, so yours would likely have to be further apart....

    An alternate idea is to cut a channel in the raised sides of the tray, leaving the bottom intact. Not so sure that wouldn't make the tray too weak.

    My current ideal is a utility trailer with a single bar plus fork attachments for all of the family bikes. Working on that for next summer.
    Dan Fuller, local bicycle enthusiast

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    I have been pondering this issue as well as I hopefully will have a similarly equipped (and sized) bike in the near future. Option include:
    A tandem style tray with the elevated for mount
    Cutting and hinging the fender so it will clear the tray (and the ground if you need to put the bike down on the fork tips
    Cutting the fender and using a flexible mudflap or some sort (leather maybe?)

    of these I like option 2 but it will likely be a pain to execute so im looking for other ideas as well
     

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    Default Honjo fenders

    I have a bike with Honjo fenders and on both mine and my wifes van we have a Yakima Lockjaw. This rack attaches to the bikes downtube and both wheels are left on the bike.

    Works like a charm and you can pick them up cheap on Ebay or Craigs list.

    http://cgi.ebay.com/Yakima-Lockjaw-l...item439b66e491

    willy in pacifica
     

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    I have seen what I will call, for want of the real name, fork extenders a the rack place for use with bikes that have disk brakes.

    They extend the mount point for the fork mount up to a higher point so that the disk can clear the tray.


    Take a look for those.


    Edit - here is an example of what I mean -- http://yakima.com/racks/rack-systems...k-adapter.aspx
     

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    I just use the Thule carriers that allow me to keep the front wheel on my Strada Bianca.
     

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    I've been a Yakima dealer for about 20 years and still struggle with the fendered bike issue. The best I can recommend is the Boa mount from Yakima (or a similar one from Thule/Rocky). This type of mount does nor have the long tray to interfer with the front fender. The drawback is that you need a minimum 32" crossbar spread. This is problem for some vehicles (e.g. Honda Element =30") that have fixed mounting points. I'm sure that with all the knowledge available here someone can modify the short rear tray of the Boa type mounts so they could be used.

    I have also experimented with the "extenders" and still haven't much luck there. All depends on the length of your front fender.

    Hope this helps.

    Jim
     

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    We have a Thule tandem mount--the one with the swiveling fork block.
    When roofing my bike with Honjos, I partially swivel the fork block and use extra straps (fender to rack, second strap around rear rim/tire) to stabilize everything. Tandem carrier raised fork blocks aren't tall enough to give enough clearance. An alternative--not as nice as any metal fender--would be Planet Bike Cascadias, with the long mudflap. Also, try to find one of the old Yakima lowrider-rack-friendly mounts with the extra-tall fork block. They were made in the 1980's.
     

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    Reading this I'm curious why the obvious solution of a full tray mount that leaves the front wheel on and secures the bike via a down tube clamp isn't the simple answer.

    I've used various incarnations from Thule for over 20 years with zero issues (just keep the down tube clamp jaws clean or you will get scratches). At the same time, I've seen several damaged forks from fork mounted racks.

    In general, when I talk to folks there seems to be some bias against full trays, and some belief that fork mounts are more secure.

    Thoughts here???

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    Fork mounts are more secure. Another issue is that the most secure of the "upright" (leave front wheel on) models is that they grip the wheels --this is a problem with fenders. The other uprights clamp on the downtubes and run the risk of scratching paint etc.
     

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    Quote Originally Posted by GSmith View Post
    Reading this I'm curious why the obvious solution of a full tray mount that leaves the front wheel on and secures the bike via a down tube clamp isn't the simple answer.
    it is.

    -g
     

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    Perhaps a non sequitur; why not a rear hitch rack? No worries about fenders (or parking garage roofs, etc.).
     

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    Quote Originally Posted by jharsha View Post
    Fork mounts are more secure. Another issue is that the most secure of the "upright" (leave front wheel on) models is that they grip the wheels --this is a problem with fenders. The other uprights clamp on the downtubes and run the risk of scratching paint etc.
    On what basis do you declare that fork mounts are more secure?

    I'm aware of at least 3 instances where forks have broken in fork mount racks at the drop outs. I've personally never heard of any issues with full trays. I use fork mounts inside my vans and trailer where cross winds are not an issue, but as I've said, I've used full trays on the roof for over 20 years with zero issues.

    My Thule trays, old and new, mount securely on the down tube, and at the bottom of each wheel where they sit in the tray. The down tube clamp arm provides structural integrity in cross winds, instead of the bikes fork, and the three points of attachment seem better than two. An added bonus is that I don't have to deal with front wheels in the car, or in a separate mount on the roof.

    As for scratches on the down tubes, just keep the jaws clean and it's not an issue.

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    I have the Rock Mounts full tray, fork dropout clamp style racks, and Berthoud fenders with mud flaps. I am able to set the bottom of the front fender outside the tray, and still clamp the fork securely. It is not ideal, but it works when necessary.
     

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    Why hasn't someone invented a full tray, keep the front wheel on mount, wide based mount that clamps the rear skewer in the same way that a trainer holds a bike? Seems like that could work. All that would then be needed is a strap to keep the front wheel from twisting in the tray.
     

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    I cut mine down and added a long leather mudflap.
     

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    Quote Originally Posted by JLP View Post
    I cut mine down and added a long leather mudflap.

    I'm using SKS fenders but did the same thing.
     

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    Default I think you're right Gary

    Quote Originally Posted by GSmith View Post
    Reading this I'm curious why the obvious solution of a full tray mount that leaves the front wheel on and secures the bike via a down tube clamp isn't the simple answer.

    I've used various incarnations from Thule for over 20 years with zero issues (just keep the down tube clamp jaws clean or you will get scratches). At the same time, I've seen several damaged forks from fork mounted racks.

    In general, when I talk to folks there seems to be some bias against full trays, and some belief that fork mounts are more secure.

    Thoughts here???
    My bias against the down tube clamp jaws is for the exact reason that you mention. I've always been reluctant to put a clamp on a painted frame, where as my dropouts get clamped all the time. It also always looked to me like racks using the down tube clamp moved around and wobbled a lot, which left me with the impression that they were less secure. It wasn't a verified fact for me, just my impression.

    With all of that said, it seems pretty clear that the down tube clamp style is the best option for me. I'll probably hit ebay to find a Thule version (only because it will fit my existing rectangular Thule cross bars) of this style tray and put it smack dab in the middle of my current trays. It will be able to transport my fendered bikes and I'll have a third bike tray for moving one bike, so it's a win-win situation.

    Someone suggested a tow hitch rack, which would probably work too, but we have a Golf, which isn't exactly designed with towing in mind, so we donít have a tow hitch on it now. Additionally, since itís a hatchback, that type of rack would at least partially obscure the rear lift gate, which would sorta defeat the purpose of a hatchback. Itís probably a good solution for some, but not for me specifically.

    I definitely considered modifying the fender, but I like the way they look and that length is an important part of there function. Right now, they are long enough that they donít really require a mud flap and Iím not too excited about hacking up almost $100 in fenders.

    When I made the OP I thought perhaps there was some magic trick or simple modification I could make that would solve the problem. I guess I was also looking for a DIY solution that didnít require any new equipment, because buying car roof racks for bikes is not one of the fulfilling purchases I have to make. Unfortunately, sometimes, throwing money at the problem really is the most elegant solution. Thanks for all the suggestions, the help is appreciated.
     

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    FYI. You dont have to limit yourself to Thule. The Yakima upright carriers will also fit Thule bars.
     

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