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Thread: Here's an easy recommendation

  1. #21
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    Default Re: Here's an easy recommendation

    Park and Rohloff have tools. I've generally just used a ruler measured over a large multiple of links. Also, like others, I have several bikes and at my age typically only ride 5000 to 6000 miles a year, so no bike gets more than 1000 miles over that period. The odds that I wear a chain to the point of destroying other drivetrain components are pretty low.

  2. #22
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    Default Re: Here's an easy recommendation

    Quote Originally Posted by Chik View Post
    I've noticed that since I started using NFS, the lifespan of my chains has extended substantially.
    I only just got my first chain checker -- a Park CC-4 -- maybe a year ago ...and it's been almost laughably useless, since according to it none of my chains are anywhere near requiring replacement!
    Of course, I've been using NFS on my chains for ~4 years, so...

  3. #23
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    Default Re: Here's an easy recommendation

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Ross View Post
    I only just got my first chain checker -- a Park CC-4 -- maybe a year ago ...and it's been almost laughably useless, since according to it none of my chains are anywhere near requiring replacement!
    Of course, I've been using NFS on my chains for ~4 years, so...
    Good to know I'm not the only crazy one! :)
    Chikashi Miyamoto

  4. #24
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    Default Re: Here's an easy recommendation

    Quote Originally Posted by Too Tall View Post
    Rohloff. What I appreciate about it is how easily I'm able to see progressive wear.

    https://www.rohloff.de/en/products/tools
    NFS and the Rohloff. I wipe the chain frequently before rolling out the door. I use the 0.75mm side before I re-lube (infrequently). Chains still wear out but my cassettes/chainrings seem to last indefinitely. Part of that is either 1. fixed wheel or 2. 10-11 rear cogs with many choices in the happy middle range. 16-17-18-19-21 spreads the wear really well for JRA.

    Best Regards,

    Will
    William M. deRosset
    Fort Collins, CO

  5. #25
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    Default Re: Here's an easy recommendation

    I put a finishing nail into a door frame and hang a new chain next to the worn chain. Pull them straight and measure the distance between two pins. If the difference is more than 1/16" per one foot of chain, then replace.

  6. #26
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    Default Re: Here's an easy recommendation

    This thread made me realize that I can use a garden-variety caliper to check chain wear accurately. A couple of years ago I bought one of these for general use in the shop:


    41102_1.jpg


    www.wihatools.com/dial-caliper-dialmax-metric

    They are about $45. No batteries, easy to use, last forever, Wiha quality. Those gradations on the dial are 0.1mm. The internal measuring arms are just the right size to fit in between the rollers.

    Given the price of some chain-wear tools, a caliper makes more sense. Any serious home mechanic needs a caliper anyway.

    I've never used it to measure chain wear until tonight. I'm glad I read vSalon.

  7. #27
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    Default Re: Here's an easy recommendation

    Quote Originally Posted by Lionel View Post
    No need for a tool replace at 5000km or less.
    It doesn't get much simpler than this.

    The mistake some make is removing the factory lubricant prior to installation. The chain will be less efficient at first but that improves with use. You should be able to go past 1000km (dry road) then clean the chain some and refresh with NFS. New chain at around <5000km should result in long lived ti cogs.

  8. #28
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    Default Re: Here's an easy recommendation

    Well, wiping the sticky external coat is still a good idea tonavoid having dirt sticking to it. Just wipe it with a rag without using any degreaser.
    --
    T h o m a s

  9. #29
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    Default Re: Here's an easy recommendation

    How your Campag chain is made...

    Last edited by rwsaunders; 01-21-2021 at 06:02 PM.
    rw saunders
    hey, how lucky can one man get.

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