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Thread: Does being a connoisseur ruin your ability to appreciate?

  1. #41
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    i'd like to think that connoiseurment deepens ones capacity to appreciate something... and that involves both high and low. i'd hope that the focused love of a thingment allowed one more words and a broader narrative in which to appreciate the thing, rather than a narrow view and shallower experience...

    to love something should deepen and awaken ones eye to the thing, rather than blind it. so i'd think it is a more active way of engaging the object rather than a binary shorthand for what's good or bad.
    shrink, terrorist, poet, president of concerned cyclists for the abolishment of bovine source bicycle parts and head of the disaffected commie dishwashers union.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gt6267a View Post
    I like coffee.

    I have a small stash of maybe 8-10 different green beans varieties at the house and roast weekly.

    I have a decent grinder and espresso machine and have studied barista skills such that my espresso is pretty fcuking good. My steamed milk has bubbles so small you canít fcuking see them, but you know they are there when drinking my siht. Without question, I make the best Macchiato in town. Though, given where I live, that might not be saying much.

    When traveling to places with better coffee resources, I make sure to track down specialty coffee shops and get an espresso or Macchiato or something lovely.

    While my espresso machine has been out for service, I have been exploring roasting for my French press and loving the results.

    I enjoy the coffee from Duncan Donuts and Waffle House. Usually with cream and sugar, but that stuff is mofo tasty.

    Like TT, I like percolator coffee roasted over a fire. You know its done when the siht is pouring out the spout and screwing up the fire.

    Did I mention that I like coffee?

    For anyone who tastes Jamaican Blue Mtn coffee or some unobtanium auction lot wonder bean that ruins all other coffee for them and canít drink anything but what they have convinced themselves is the bestest and everything else is the worstest Ö those people I think donít like coffee. Maybe they like pursuing esoteric things or being a snob or some such sillyness. But whatever their interest is, its not coffee.

    I get that someone might taste something that becomes their favorite (I have one as well hip hop hooray!!!!) but that everything they previously enjoyed is now siht and no longer pleasurable, I call bull siht that they really liked it before the faux-epiphany.

    I have Serotta Legend with R10 on it. As far as bikes go, it doesnít suck. I had a better time on a rental with a shitty saddle in France than I usually do on the Serotta. We rented what could only be described as freak-show machines and rode them all over wine country. A little wine, a little cheese, a few crashes, a hell of a good time with friends.

    I don't get the whole, it has to be the best or I can't enjoy it thing.
    +10 on this post. btw I like 8 oclock 100% columbian freshly burr ground in an old porcelain melitta pot


    I coudn't imagine owning an entry level Trek...

    I'd take any entry level bike over anything with internal combustion every day of my life if I could get away with it.

    the word connoisseur always implies judgment and usually taste. some people have neither--and it's not because they can't afford luxury goods, which frankly is what we're talking about here.
     

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    Quote Originally Posted by swoop View Post
    i'd like to think that connoiseurment deepens ones capacity to appreciate something...
    connoiseurment? from Swoop (who's usually pretty good about anti-neologism-ism)? at least make sure you use 2 s's! the noun in its most basic sense would be simply connaissance, which is just knowledge, familiarity.
    however, I must request that the word, as spelled above, be placed on the rusty trombonerusty trombonerusty trombonerusty trombonerusty trombonerusty trombonerusty trombone list. please.
     

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    Quote Originally Posted by mjbabcock View Post
    Bikes...I coudn't imagine owning an entry level Trek let alone a Pacific or a Huffy that I would have loved when I was a kid.
    funny thing about that. I worked there in the early days before they realized they could make a lot of money by outsourcing. They had a 300 model that was entry level. I hated making those things, they were heavy and I kept thinking I was seeing little bits of trash in the steel. But we didn't make too many, I don't think they sold too well. We made a batch of the 500s, which were probably nearly as good as the top of the line models. I have always thought that they should have taken the 3-4 guys that worked there that could make a decent frame and go for the connoisseur market. But I think that I could have taken the parts from the 500 and made a frame I would still be riding. And it would have cost me $40 including the paint job. But I wasn't interested at the time.
     

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    owning two zoot dream bikes taught me that it doesn't really matter

    the pacenti was fabulous. amazing bike. kirk was terrific at each stage of the process. when I crashed it, I saw that I could replace it with an el cheapo for less than the cost of the repair.

    I had ridden the wonderbike. the chunderbike was less pleasing, but no less fast. I raced pretty well on it. The important factor was me.

    So, I could let zoot go. Didn't fix the Pacenti. Sold the fork. Won't fix it. Kirk has it.

    The Rock Lobster is sublime, as nice as a lugged frame and fork can be. However, I found that I never rode it once the racing season was on. I always grabbed the QA chunderbike. I went for the tool I was actually racing on.

    So, I traded my fixie for a closeout Fuji AL frame. Took all the parts off the Lobster. Put the frame in the closet (I may not ride it, but no effin way I'm selling it).

    I now have two chunderbikes that I ride the snot out of. Works for me.

    Its sort of like dating a model so you can marry the gal next door.

    What a sexist utterance. I'm ashamed.
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    Ahneida Ride ruined my simple existence forever.




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    Quote Originally Posted by EricKeller View Post
    funny thing about that. I worked there in the early days before they realized they could make a lot of money by outsourcing. They had a 300 model that was entry level. I hated making those things, they were heavy and I kept thinking I was seeing little bits of trash in the steel. But we didn't make too many, I don't think they sold too well. We made a batch of the 500s, which were probably nearly as good as the top of the line models. I have always thought that they should have taken the 3-4 guys that worked there that could make a decent frame and go for the connoisseur market. But I think that I could have taken the parts from the 500 and made a frame I would still be riding. And it would have cost me $40 including the paint job. But I wasn't interested at the time.
    They in fact made a decent frame that still has fans in the connoisseur market, the 720.
     

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    how 'bout the 770? a friend of mine had one of those (new at the time), resplendent with campy super record. man, that bike was hot...and pink!

    Quote Originally Posted by palincss View Post
    They in fact made a decent frame that still has fans in the connoisseur market, the 720.
     

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    Quote Originally Posted by Too Tall View Post
    To answer your question. Please beat me for a week or three if I'm ever rightfully accused of being a connoisseur. That would mean I no longer can appreciate a pot of cowboy coffee boiled on a dying fire or enjoy riding a 40 yr. old clapped out 1 speed with no brakes. When you narrow your eyes as such there are fewer and fewer cherished moments.

    Eyes wide open, chew slowly and wear sunscreen.
    That this thread drifted towards price/expense as a surrogate for connoisseur to me misses the point. I find myself in TT's camp, albeit less eloquently

    If you start to narrow the range of the things or experiences in order for you find joy in the activity, you are only going to end up being disappointed.

    For me, this happened with windsurfing. In the very beginnning EVERY day was a good one. as I get better, the wind threshold I "needed" to declare a great day kept increasng, until I relaized I was only having a half dozen GREAT days a year, versus 75+ GREAT days....point here is i did it to myself, and somehow loss the essence of why I even started sailing in the first place.

    Get back to center and enjoy whatever you have and do...
     

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    Did you get back to the center or did you find a new hobby?


    Quote Originally Posted by pdmtong View Post
    That this thread drifted towards price/expense as a surrogate for connoisseur to me misses the point. I find myself in TT's camp, albeit less eloquently

    If you start to narrow the range of the things or experiences in order for you find joy in the activity, you are only going to end up being disappointed.

    For me, this happened with windsurfing. In the very beginnning EVERY day was a good one. as I get better, the wind threshold I "needed" to declare a great day kept increasng, until I relaized I was only having a half dozen GREAT days a year, versus 75+ GREAT days....point here is i did it to myself, and somehow loss the essence of why I even started sailing in the first place.

    Get back to center and enjoy whatever you have and do...
     

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    Quote Originally Posted by Too Tall View Post
    To answer your question. Please beat me for a week or three if I'm ever rightfully accused of being a connoisseur. That would mean I no longer can appreciate a pot of cowboy coffee boiled on a dying fire or enjoy riding a 40 yr. old clapped out 1 speed with no brakes. When you narrow your eyes as such there are fewer and fewer cherished moments.

    Eyes wide open, chew slowly and wear sunscreen.
    i'm with tt on this, as there is a time and place for junky food, crappy beer, cheap wine, and floozies. (think hunt/fish camp, poker night, nahbs)

    whilst i have an inner connoisseur, i try to keep him from fouling simple enjoyment up. actually little mr. connoisseur surprised me the other day when i picked up a freshly split piece of oak, sniffed it, and he recognized dozens of aromas found in good red wines. then mr. connisseur started to point out that some of the aromas we had previously associated with the toasting of the wine barrel-and even the fruit itself--were all in that wood. that's when i told him to shut up and went on to enjoy those aromas. and also made a note to donate some fresh oak to tony's next wine appreciation class.

    so it can go the other way. enhancing an experience not limiting enjoyment. perspective maybe?

    live consciously with purpose and if you're going to keep your eyes wide-open, get some good safety glasses.


    how'd this lint get in there?






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    Quote Originally Posted by mjbabcock View Post
    Did you get back to the center or did you find a new hobby?
    returned to center. reminded myself why i wanted to sail in the first place, and to be appreciative of the times I was out on the water. look, if it takes 30+ knots to make you happy, let's face it, you are gonna be pretty sad. not a way to live. also started riding more. diversification - yes, that's a way too.

    IMHO what one gets out of anything is how YOU frame it going in.

    I know I know...might seem a bit zen-ish. but i do think it's true. Look for the good stuff in anything and you just may find it...even a "lousy" cup of coffee shared with the best of friends can be "great"
     

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    Enjoy the best but don't let that devalue the rest.


    *Note to self: Brand that quote Disturbed*


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    [QUOTE=DOOFUS;152615] The important factor was me. QUOTE]

    Yup....

    st
     

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    Quote Originally Posted by Too Tall View Post

    Eyes wide open, chew slowly and wear sunscreen and don't forget to wipe the drool off your chin.

    Fixed that for ya!

    Anyway, you were merely justifying being a connoisseur of cheap sh!t. Me too, I recognise the signs. I think I'm right, but my front centre is kinda noodley.
     

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