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    Question De Rosa

    Right next to me is Bigman's 1988 35th Anniversary De Rosa ...

    What a beauty .... Pristine as they come All Campy C Record
    and less then 100 miles on her ... Even the tubies are fresh .

    got one question ... The rear cable to the Delta brakes is routed
    right on the top of the top tube in the "white" cable housing.

    What is the logic behind such a routing of the rear brake cable?
    .
    This is a generic image. Bigman's frame is a 63 and as least as nice.

     

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    One issue is that those same three large braze-ons located at the 7-o'clock position would likely scrape a rider's legs.
     

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ahneida Ride Hide View Post
    got one question ... The rear cable to the Delta brakes is routed
    right on the top of the top tube in the "white" cable housing.

    What is the logic behind such a routing of the rear brake cable?
    Actually, because the 12:00 routing predates the 7:00 routing (I'm pretty sure that's correct) another way to look at it is why did they switch to the side? I have no first-hand knowledge, but I bet it happened to allow the switch to "bare cable" for that portion of the run, which in turn might have happened to reduce friction. Just a guess.

    M

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    pretty bike
    so heavy, so heavy

    gawd i am glad i dont ride one.
     

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    What a beauty!:adore:

    My Grandis has the cables routed on top as well. I don't know the logic other than it was done that way more often then.

    The switch to having cable stops should theoretically give better braking performance because there would be less compression of the cable housing. I don't know if it's true, but it makes sense.

    Those pedals are a trip!
    La Cheeserie!

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    On Italian bikes, by the late 70's, braze on guides for full length housing merely
    replace the clamp on campagnolo housing guides that were ubiquitous since the 50's.

    There are other ways to route the cable, which had of course been done since the 40's
    either with cable stops, on either side, top or bottom, depending on the style of what
    was popular in the region and the time. They all work.

    Italian manufacturers were late to the braze on party, something about the extra heat
    of brazing weakening the frame, despite the fact that French touring frames had been
    covered with a dozen or more braze-ons for decades.

    -g
    Attached Images Attached Images
     

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    Cables enclosed in housing protected the wires from rust and other crudities that would gum up the smoothness of the brake action. Problem is/was, that type of cable routing enables a LOT of sweat to collect there, and hence a lot of rust on top tubes, or at least that's been my observation and experience. Split cable stops with bare wire minimize this problem.
     

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    Default Another thought

    Remember that in those days, brake cables/housing exited the top of the brake levers and it was a smooth path to route the cable along the top of the top tube since it is coming from above. With under the tape cable routing the smoother cable path may be to route it along the side.

    I also agree with Grant's ideas about the braze-ons adapting to the cable clips.
     

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    Piece of trivia -
    Campagnolo made those top tube cable guides for at least 10 years
    before they made brakes, which they didn't make unitil 1968...
    as you were....

    -g
    Attached Images Attached Images
     

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ahneida Ride Hide View Post
    This is a generic image. Bigman's frame is a 63 and as least as nice.

    That is my bike! It rides like a dream but is not a lightweight as SteveP points out, but then where I live, there are no hills so who cares. The cable guide locations remained where they were before switching to aero brake cable routing. Is Bigman getting his bars redone in white hide?
     

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    If you used the cable clips and didn't have the cable on the top you'd tear your legs up on the little sharp edges of the screw and nut.
     

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    Quote Originally Posted by Polyglot View Post
    That is my bike! It rides like a dream but is not a lightweight as SteveP points out, but then where I live, there are no hills so who cares.
    Very nice.

    From where I sit, if I glance over my right shoulder, I can see my DeRosa - a Neo Pro.

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    Default I feel so old

    Gawd!
    this conversation makes me feel ancient! I remember when the switch to braze on cable guides on the top tube was the coolest new thing.
    -Eric
     

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    i *belive* Tom Ritchey actually came up with the idea to slot a cable stop. that said, allot of my bikes use partial or fully solid lengths of housing. very weather resistant, and for hydro discs a must. split stops are just as guilty for rust as "o's" - the end of the housing/blown out ferrules/strands of wire from sis housing eats through the paint, and there you go..........Steve.
    Steve Garro, Coconino Cycles.
    Frames & Bicycles built to measure and Custom wheels
    Hecho en Flagstaff, Arizona desde 2003
    www.coconinocycles.com
    www.coconinocycles.blogspot.com

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    My brother's Calfee has full-length rear brake housing. It's hidden pretty well in the picture, but I thought I'd post it here anyways. As Steve mentions above, there are still good reasons to run solid housing.




    All of the "sealed" cable systems (Gore Ride-On, Nokian to a lesser extent) seem to be an effort to obtain some of the functionality of full-length housing without the weight. Perhaps building a cross bike with full housing would be a good idea...
     

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    Quote Originally Posted by caleb View Post
    My brother's Calfee has full-length rear brake housing. It's hidden pretty well in the picture, but I thought I'd post it here anyways. As Steve mentions above, there are still good reasons to run solid housing.




    All of the "sealed" cable systems (Gore Ride-On, Nokian to a lesser extent) seem to be an effort to obtain some of the functionality of full-length housing without the weight. Perhaps building a cross bike with full housing would be a good idea...
    I'm not sure why Craig does it this way. In my experience, it does degrade braking performance slightly compared to actual cable stops but it isn't a deal breaker. It is a clean look.
     

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    My first generation C-40 also has full length housing. It works well, but my leg sometimes hits -painfully- the little sharp thing that holds the housing to the frame.
     

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    Quote Originally Posted by steve garro View Post
    i *belive* Tom Ritchey actually came up with the idea to slot a cable stop.
    The split cable stops were commonplace on low-end bikes before Ritchey came around.
     

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