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Thread: Can we talk about lame fitting?

  1. #101
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    Perfect. Appreciate your story my man. It is an ideal outcome and more so because you took charge to find answers. Nice.
    Quote Originally Posted by AntLockyer View Post
    My story is this.

    I wanted a road bike as my nasty $90 MTB with slicks on wasn't floating my boat. I have some disposable income but not a whole lot. I went to a bike shop and actually liked the guy I rapped with about bikes. He says if there was any chance I would race I should buy the Cannondale. When I picked it up (bear in mind I knew nothing about road bikes and had only ridden the demo bike for 3 miles) the saddle was at a random height and that was it.

    I managed to get myself in some sort of a position using Peter White's fitting article and starting riding.

    Some time later my back was killing me and I went to a fitter. They told me my bike was the wrong size and shape and did this to get me going.


    To be fair the dude gave me some advice on core strength and I had gone in the complaining of back pain.

    Several month later it still hurt I went for another fitting with another guy and had a bit more idea of what I wanted. It was much better but my back/hip still hurt.

    I went around and around changing this and that and none of it worked. Then I read Hinaults book, read some of the comments here and changed my fit myself and just put some miles on it. I've got a decent amount of drop, a lot of setback and a longer stem.

    I am more aware of my body and understand the pain comes from a bad peddling motion on one side that now I am aware of I can deal with.

    Since then I feel like I need a longer stem still and raise the saddle a little. I see no need to go lower as my back is horizontal in the drops.



    If I had to advise someone in my position (no pun intended) it would really be to get a bike using the Hinault formula for sizing and stick the miles on it with the vision of the pros in your head when you pedal. Eventually you will understand what you need but you can't buy it.

  2. #102
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    Quote Originally Posted by EDS View Post
    Most people could skip the custom bike too and get an appropriately sized stock frame.
    Bwwwwwwaaaaaaaaahahaahah. Oh mercy.

  3. #103
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    I can't think of any other sport where fit/function and aesthetic are more closely aligned. It's almost always the case that a bike that looks right, rides right. The question is, can you?
    You can't underestimate the relationship between fitness and fit.

    Some folks are injured or unfit. It's good to see them eased into cycling. It's bad to see them sold a custom that costs a bundle atmo. Get a bike you can stand over and reach the bars easily then ride, a lot! Get fit, get well, get to know your body. Do the work. Pain isn't always bad. Know the difference.

    I have two kinds of bikes. Race bikes with a lower position (that show more post) and randonneurs with less bar/saddle drop position but effectively they both produce the same fit. A bike that looks ugly ---malproportioned, upside down--- didn't have to be that way. Arguing purely for function over aesthetic (bike, fella' on the bike, etc.) is a poor compromise.
    Qui plume a, guerre a. Ce monde est un vaste temple dédié à la discorde.

  4. #104
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    Quote Originally Posted by dbrk View Post
    I can't think of any other sport where fit/function and aesthetic are more closely aligned. It's almost always the case that a bike that looks right, rides right. The question is, can you?
    You can't underestimate the relationship between fitness and fit.

    Some folks are injured or unfit. It's good to see them eased into cycling. It's bad to see them sold a custom that costs a bundle atmo. Get a bike you can stand over and reach the bars easily then ride, a lot! Get fit, get well, get to know your body. Do the work. Pain isn't always bad. Know the difference.

    I have two kinds of bikes. Race bikes with a lower position (that show more post) and randonneurs with less bar/saddle drop position but effectively they both produce the same fit. A bike that looks ugly ---malproportioned, upside down--- didn't have to be that way. Arguing purely for function over aesthetic (bike, fella' on the bike, etc.) is a poor compromise.
    Yup, fit is directly proportional to fitness.

    By the way, that's some great fit below, atmo...
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Fit is directly proportional to fitness.

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