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Thread: Campagnolo compliant pedals

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    Default Re: Campagnolo compliant pedals

    Quote Originally Posted by WMdeR View Post
    I had good luck with RXS. Less so with (early) Expresso pedals. I cracked one of the carbon bodies in under 1000mi. I went back to RXS pedals and cleats, which were excellent.

    Once my RXS pedals got crunchy and the plastic/carbon-fiber bodies worn enough that I could pull out of them, I bought a test set of SPD-sl. It has been mixed.

    The SPD-sl pedals and cleats are ubiquitous. The bearings are excellent in the DA model, anyway. They look nice. The cleats do not creak like Looks, but they don't last as long as the rxs cleat. The clip-in motion and effort is different/harder to get right. They have enough float (2deg), and the cleat adjustment is ample, but they hold my shoes differently, and my knees hadn't fully adapted before I switched to SPD and walkable shoes for the winter.

    I had made a similar forced march a few years ago when the Time ATAC design was updated, my old ones had finally worn out and I updated the fleet. Then I broke two of the stamped/squared-off bails on back-to-back rides. (Two lefts, so two pair out of commission).

    Life is too short to be Time's beta tester. I live with the mud/snow clogging and the steel SPD cleats instead. They work.

    Best Regards,

    Will
    William M deRosset
    Fort Collins CO USA
    Thanks for the cheerful news. My SPD-SL experience is similar to yours. They tick all of the boxes except for the one that coddles my knees. I want to like them, but they leave me cold. I honestly don't know what to think about Time. First, I am going against my reservation concerning the re-centering tension, I loath setting up a new pedal system, it is an expensive trial, and finally, the reports of Time pedals having kittens of all stripes makes me a bit green behind the gills.
     

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    Default Re: Campagnolo compliant pedals

    I don't have any experience with the xpro design, and I am hopeful that they work out well. I assume they worked out the bugs. The pedals are appealing to me, I am just gunshy from the last generation of their stuff.. let us know how it goes, and whether your bike goes into shock with the change.

    Cheers,

    Will
     

  3. #43
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    Default Re: Campagnolo compliant pedals

    Quote Originally Posted by WMdeR View Post
    I don't have any experience with the xpro design, and I am hopeful that they work out well. I assume they worked out the bugs. The pedals are appealing to me, I am just gunshy from the last generation of their stuff.. let us know how it goes, and whether your bike goes into shock with the change.

    Cheers,

    Will
    I'll deliver a report once I've clipped in a few times. If Time made the Xpro pedal from alloy, and it retained all of the current features, and it was an additional 100 grams, and was durable as heck, would anyone purchase them? I know that I would feel better about screwing them onto my levers.

    If all goes pear-shaped, Speedplay is my default. It is just that with them, when I pounce from the saddle, I feel like I am stepping on a hummingbird's skull.
     

  4. #44
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    Default Re: Campagnolo compliant pedals

    Quote Originally Posted by WFSTEKL View Post
    Thanks for the cheerful news. My SPD-SL experience is similar to yours. They tick all of the boxes except for the one that coddles my knees. I want to like them, but they leave me cold. I honestly don't know what to think about Time. First, I am going against my reservation concerning the re-centering tension, I loath setting up a new pedal system, it is an expensive trial, and finally, the reports of Time pedals having kittens of all stripes makes me a bit green behind the gills.
    same experience with the shimano's for me. logically, I don't get why they haven't worked for me, as almost everyone seems to like them, but I've tried the yellow, blue and red cleats and there's just something off. maybe it's the q factor or just having too much lateral adjustability and I just can't find the sweet spot, or maybe I just don't give them enough time to re-train my knees/feet to something else, so I'll make one last ditch effort on my winter/rain bike this year, but as noted, I gravitate back to the Time's.

    Don't get hung up about the re-centering. It's not like it kicks in the moment you go 1 degree off center, it's way more than that. I've found that it's just enough that during set-up you can feel when you're in the middle of your float window or not, so it's easier to fine tune the cleat placement after which it's more like a reminder that you're outside your norm (and really, if your foot is swinging 8 degrees per pedal stroke, either something is wrong or you should just stick with speedplay) I still wonder sometimes if the Time isn't allowing me too much float, but that usually means it's time for new cleats.

    For the record, I've never broken a Time or had them squeak, but I still haven't tried the latest x-pro series

    finally, I'm gonna say this (not directed at op, just a general banter): when I'm on my bike, the last thing I think about is the dang aesthetics of my pedals! it's like people who obsess over the color of the saddle (which should only be black, full stop) when your feet and ass are on the dang thing, as they should be, you can't see 'em! when it's hanging on the wall in retirement, worry about aesthetics and hunt down some old Pro-Fit (actually my first pair of the spd-sl were the polished ultegras, they were pretty in their japanese functional kind a way and I was disappointed the knees weren't happy--I was trying to move away from the Sampson Stratics--yes, I was one of those nut jobs they actually worked for--really they were speedplay zeros before their time but with problematic cleats if you ever walked in them....)
     

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    Default Re: Campagnolo compliant pedals

    Sampson Stratics! I saw a few in use at Nationals back in the day, talked to a guy who was using them, and the next thing I knew, I had a pair fastened to my bicycle. Yikes!
     

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    Default Re: Campagnolo compliant pedals

    Knocking on wood I haven't snap any time atac or xpresso body.
    I had switched from look mostly because of the squeak (did they ever solved this?) and my knees made me stick to them as all problem I had earlier were solved magically.
    --
    T h o m a s

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    Default Re: Campagnolo compliant pedals

    Quote Originally Posted by sk_tle View Post
    Knocking on wood I haven't snap any time atac or xpresso body.
    I had switched from look mostly because of the squeak (did they ever solved this?) and my knees made me stick to them as all problem I had earlier were solved magically.
    A lot of my pals ride Looks. They still squeak.

    I ride SPD-SL and they've been the best for me, by far, though I have still managed to wear out a handful of pedal bodies so they're not quite indestructible. Still, no complaints.

    I rode Speedplay Zeros for a spell. Once set up and paired with stiff shoes, they were really good. But maintenance and setup are a pain and I was wearing through cleats often enough that I spent as much time in that "dialing-in" phase as I did in the "just riding" phase. So I moved on.
    "I guess you're some weird relic of an obsolete age." - davids

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    Default Re: Campagnolo compliant pedals

    Quote Originally Posted by WFSTEKL View Post
    For me, an ideal pedal would have the free rotation of Speedplay, and the surface area of SDP-SL.
    Isnít that what Coombe pedals were trying to do? Anyone tried them?

    COOMBE MILLENNIUM PRO - HIGH PERFORMANCE - LOW PROFILE - LIGHT WEIGHT - CLIPLESS BICYCLE PEDALS.
    Colin Mclelland

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    Default Re: Campagnolo compliant pedals

    Quote Originally Posted by WFSTEKL View Post
    Sampson Stratics! I saw a few in use at Nationals back in the day, talked to a guy who was using them, and the next thing I knew, I had a pair fastened to my bicycle. Yikes!
    James at Cyclingtips had a trip down memory lane a few weeks back: Throwback Thursday: Sampson Stratics road pedals | CyclingTips
     

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    Default Re: Campagnolo compliant pedals

    Quote Originally Posted by Colinmclelland View Post
    Isn’t that what Coombe pedals were trying to do? Anyone tried them?

    COOMBE MILLENNIUM PRO - HIGH PERFORMANCE - LOW PROFILE - LIGHT WEIGHT - CLIPLESS BICYCLE PEDALS.
    I was intrigued by the bebop a few years ago and I might have tried the coombe if they weren't that expensive.
    --
    T h o m a s

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    Default Re: Campagnolo compliant pedals

    If I am reading the Coombe literature correctly, the system only allows 3 degrees of rotation in one direction, either medially or laterally from ctr. That would be a Sophie's Choice for me. The additional surface area relative to Speedplay looks good. Choosing between inward or outward rotation is bad.
     

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    Default Re: Campagnolo compliant pedals

    Quote Originally Posted by bdaghisallo View Post
    James at Cyclingtips had a trip down memory lane a few weeks back: Throwback Thursday: Sampson Stratics road pedals | CyclingTips
    Reading that delivered a cold sweat. I don't recall the function characteristics if the pedal, but I do remember breaking a cleat in the midst of a 115 mile ride. That was the kiss of death with those things for me. It is amazing that it still feels like the wild west regarding pedal selection.
     

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    Default Re: Campagnolo compliant pedals

    After 20 yrs on time atacs and ultegra i went for a ride on a pair of old suntour comp platform pedals and never switched back. I ride w/ the softest soles i can find and have no more foot pain and numbness.
    I came here for the socks.

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    Default Re: Campagnolo compliant pedals

    Quote Originally Posted by colker View Post
    After 20 yrs on time atacs and ultegra i went for a ride on a pair of old suntour comp platform pedals and never switched back. I ride w/ the softest soles i can find and have no more foot pain and numbness.
    Seems to be where I'm heading.

    Back in the day when we didn't complain incessantly about nothing. We used toe clips and straps that offered zero creature comforts. When a new pair of shoes were purchased, the user would first ride without the cleats mounted for about 100 miles until the rear pedal cage impressed a line across the bottom of the leather sole. This duration allowed the foot to find its natural placement on the pedal. This depression also indicated where the cleat was to be located---parallel to the line, but about 10 mm forward so that your toes were not jammed against the front of the clips. Off to the shoe cobbler you went with a pocket full of nails, a pair of Detto shoes and a pair of TA alloy cleats. An old man behind the curtain would greet you, take the mess you were holding in your hands, slip back behind the curtain, and then a few moments later he would extend his arm through the curtain holding your shoes with cleats mounted. That was that. And then we pedaled, and pedaled, around four corners of city blocks, to the turn-around and back, and to the crowd waiting at the top of the hill. No float, no rotation, no rocking, no nothing.

    And then things changed. Fluid viscosity increased, joints got sassy, rigor mortis found its grip---the proverbial old age dumpster fire. I need to find a goddamn bicycle pedal that will listen to me.
     

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    Default Re: Campagnolo compliant pedals

    Quote Originally Posted by WFSTEKL View Post
    Seems to be where I'm heading.

    Back in the day when we didn't complain incessantly about nothing. We used toe clips and straps that offered zero creature comforts. When a new pair of shoes were purchased, the user would first ride without the cleats mounted for about 100 miles until the rear pedal cage impressed a line across the bottom of the leather sole. This duration allowed the foot to find its natural placement on the pedal. This depression also indicated where the cleat was to be located---parallel to the line, but about 10 mm forward so that your toes were not jammed against the front of the clips. Off to the shoe cobbler you went with a pocket full of nails, a pair of Detto shoes and a pair of TA alloy cleats. An old man behind the curtain would greet you, take the mess you were holding in your hands, slip back behind the curtain, and then a few moments later he would extend his arm through the curtain holding your shoes with cleats mounted. That was that. And then we pedaled, and pedaled, around four corners of city blocks, to the turn-around and back, and to the crowd waiting at the top of the hill. No float, no rotation, no rocking, no nothing.

    And then things changed. Fluid viscosity increased, joints got sassy, rigor mortis found its grip---the proverbial old age dumpster fire. I need to find a goddamn bicycle pedal that will listen to me.
    I got into cycling just after this era. My first shoes had adjustable cleats but the process was similar. Lots of trips around the block making adjustments.

    Part of me is nostalgic for this stuff but it wasn't uncommon then for riders to have knee issues and they are mostly a thing of the past these days. I even rode with Shimano's fixed red cleats for a season and it was easy but I didn't ultimately see any advantage so I went back to the yellow ones.

    I'm not sure what the biggest technological improvement in cycling has been since I got into it in the early 1980s, but pedals and shoes have to be close to the top of the list.

    I can now finish a 100 mile ride (well, if I ever rode 100milers these days......) and not have any foot pain or hot spots or feel like my feet have swollen or feel like I'm experiencing stress fractures. Long, hard rides or races ended with foot misery. No more. The new pedals and shoes are orders of magnitude better and my feet at least are better for it.
    La Cheeserie!

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    Default Re: Campagnolo compliant pedals

    Some didn't care about mixing Campy groupset and Dura-Ace pedals... (but 7700)
    Frank Vandenbroucke MBK Team Cofidis 1999 - OLDBICI
     

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    Default Re: Campagnolo compliant pedals

    Oh for sure, SAAB, cycling shoes, and how they are attached to the machine gets my vote for best innovations in the sport from the last forty years. The most important things are how and where we are connected to the machine. It is like the other sport that I dabble in, rowing---hands, ass and feet also connect the oarsman to the machine. How and where we are connected makes all the difference in the way we leverage our body forward.
     

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    Default Re: Campagnolo compliant pedals

    Quote Originally Posted by colker View Post
    After 20 yrs on time atacs and ultegra i went for a ride on a pair of old suntour comp platform pedals and never switched back. I ride w/ the softest soles i can find and have no more foot pain and numbness.
    +1. MKS Lambdas all day.

    lt-wiens-commuter-6.jpg
     

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    Default Re: Campagnolo compliant pedals

    Quote Originally Posted by WFSTEKL View Post
    Oh for sure, SAAB, cycling shoes, and how they are attached to the machine gets my vote for best innovations in the sport from the last forty years. The most important things are how and where we are connected to the machine. It is like the other sport that I dabble in, rowing---hands, ass and feet also connect the oarsman to the machine. How and where we are connected makes all the difference in the way we leverage our body forward.
    I cannot feel any power loss from not being attached to the pedals. I am riding w/ very thin rubber soles that conform and grip the pedal lightly. The thinnest the sole the more feedback i have from the road. My pedalling is more fluid, i feel loose and bike controlled. Stiff soles make my toes numb and clicking while on traffic feels stupid now.
    I came here for the socks.

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    Default Re: Campagnolo compliant pedals

    What happened to the OP?
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