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Thread: Scout

  1. #61
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    Default Re: Scout

    I would have thought that this isolation would have picked up the Scout pace - but no. It has allowed us to do some trailwork, and get for more rides while continuing on good progress though. We pulled the inner support off of the hood, and repaired the hood nose and the inner structure - we do not have the two pieces back together yet though.

    We cut the whole nose lip off and replaced:

    IMG_2957.JPG.jpg

    We cut the curve off the inner structure and replaced that:

    IMG_2961.JPG.jpg

    There was a lot of rot around the hinge landings and the forward legs of the support that also needed replacing.

    Meanwhile, we got it back on its own wheels for the first time in a year, and placed the door just to see what it would look like:

    IMG_2974.JPG.jpgIMG_2983.JPG.jpg

    And that was exciting. Then we fit the doors. This has been something I've been dreading for a year. I knew it would be a miracle if everything fit up nice: we didn't have much in the way of reliable datum or dimensions when we re-built the tub. Not to mention we had never seen a Scout in person and it's our first time, etc, etc. Seems like the rear of the tub is skew by about 1/2":

    IMG_2984.JPG.jpg

    Not real happy about that, but not much to be done now. The Scout experts claim Scouts are known for their dimensional inaccuracy and this looks fine. Whatever - we learn. And then there is getting the doors to fit in the door holes: a little trimming and re-welding and a little addition of 0.125" rod and the doors eventually get to be acceptable. No, pics of that part - mmaybe because it was too much "sausage factory" for recording, IDK.

    Then, we got the parking brake hooked up. We decided to use a 12v linear actuator. It has a 4" stroke and a 225# pull. We hooked 2 75# @ 4" springs so that the parking brakes would have ~150# on them when the actuator is fully retracted. Works good - and overall cheaper than a parking brake handle. We pulled a tube over the whole assembly to keep the crud off.

    IMG_2977.JPG.jpgIMG_2978.JPG.jpgIMG_2979.JPG.jpg

    We have started stripping all off the panels down to metal and spraying with epoxy primer as the weather cooperates. Then assembly and filler/sanding/primer/sanding/etc. And a million other details too.

    Meanwhile the isolation allowed us to make Mom a new bikepath cruiser. The frame build goes fast when I can miter and braze and let Finn join the main tubes with the TIG:

    IMG_2968.JPG.jpgIMG_3039.JPG.jpg

    My wife wanted something more upright because her neck hurts. A couple of rides in and she is asking about fitting drop bars. Anything is possible.

    Hope this finds you healthy! Thanks for looking - Bob & Finn
    Bob Spooner
    Departing from
    East Hampton, CT

  2. #62
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    Default Re: Scout

    Fantastic!!!!

    Keep the updates coming.
    Brian McLaughlin

  3. #63
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    Default Re: Scout

    My son whoís 11 and I pour over your details and process. We have no plans or anything, just really enjoy the ďtackle a project head onĒ shown. Thanks for providing wonderful moments for us.
    Last edited by Todd Amunrud; 04-07-2020 at 09:07 PM. Reason: Grammar
     

  4. #64
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    Default Re: Scout

    Quote Originally Posted by Todd Amunrud View Post
    My son who’s 11 and I pour over your details and process. We have no plans or anything, just really enjoy the “tackle a project head on” shown. Thanks for providing wonderful moments for us.
    Thanks - that's really nice to hear. Glad to provide some distraction! Bob & Finn
    Bob Spooner
    Departing from
    East Hampton, CT

  5. #65
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    Default Re: Scout

    "the Scout experts claim Scouts are known for their dimensional inaccuracy" -- this makes me smile. A friend had a Scout in college. I used to comment that unlike the Volkswagen microbus, which had to go out into the world before it was rebuilt a billion times by hippies under shade trees, International seemed to bring the hippies and trees right into the factory.

    Thank you for keeping this story alive. Nice work on the bike for the wife!
    Dan Fuller, local bicycle enthusiast

  6. #66
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    Default Re: Scout

    We have been plugging away, a little slower because we know we are going be waiting on the weather for some painting - though I have to figure out which end of the spray gun to point at the metal first. And the riding has been great, made better by a new bike for my youngest son - the ball sport member of the family. He is finally big enough to fit onto a medium sized frame - which means that when he outgrow this one it can go to Mom and we can justify a decent bike. I've built a bunch of full suspension bikes, but have some to the conclusion that they aren't work my trouble: to production FS bikes are just too good. We got him a Norco Fluid and it made him a new rider: able to keep up with his siblings and let me in the dust on the descents. All good.

    Anyway, back to the Scout. We took some time working the doors and finally ended up with decent gaps:

    IMG_3048.JPG.jpgIMG_3049.JPG.jpg

    That was a good deal of work.

    Then we worked on the seat mounts. We scored some nice VW GTI buckets from a buddy. It took us a whole weekend to get the seats where we wanted them and all of the mounts fabricated. We could have had a better thought out plan before we started in just building them, but where is the fun in that? The seat you see in this pic is an extra that my buddy provided to use for fitment, so we didn't bang up the good seats.

    IMG_3052.JPG.jpgIMG_3053.JPG.jpg

    Then we made a rear bumper. This was nice, easy fabrication: big relatively clean metal with bench welding.

    IMG_3064.JPG.jpg

    We ended the bumper with vertical tubes. We thought it gave the bumper ends a nice finished look and we can use them in the future for swing-away carriers if we need such things. In the meantime, Finn will 3d print some caps to finish them off.

    IMG_3065.JPG.jpg

    Test fit on the truck. There will be an appearance panel on the front edge filling the gap between the bumper and tailgate:

    IMG_3068.JPG.jpg

    The holes are for some LED lights. We are happy with the overall look.

    This past weekend we actually rolled the Scout out of the garage on it's own rubber. It's starting to look like an actual vehicle now:

    IMG_3070.JPG.jpgIMG_3071.JPG.jpg

    When the Scout was out, we did a big scrub down of the garage in preparation for painting. We sprayed some primer on a bunch of pieces: bumpers, grill and seat mounts. And also my daughter's downhill bike - she wants to give it some custom paintjob, so it got epoxy primer to start too.

    IMG_3073.JPG.jpg

    Then to finish the weekend, Finn and I started with a little filler after dinner. We are not going to go crazy with filler on this truck - we have to fair in some patches and there is some rot pockmarks that need to be filled. But we were careful with our metalwork so we don't see a full-skim filler as necessary. There will still be plenty of filler, but nothing thicker than 1/16" I think. The doors will be the big challenge - there are a couple of wrinkles on them that we just could not hammer out.

    IMG_3072.JPG.jpg

    So, lots of sanding in our near future. If the weather give us a break we could have color on this by the end of the month.

    Stay healthy everyone - thanks for looking! Bob & Finn
    Bob Spooner
    Departing from
    East Hampton, CT

  7. #67
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    Default Re: Scout

    Fantastic update Bob. That kid-o is getting the masters class.

  8. #68
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    Default Re: Scout

    Amazing. VW seats look to be a very good idea. A bit of bolster to keep the kid in the seat when he "misjudges" the rear wheel traction.
    Dan Fuller, local bicycle enthusiast

  9. #69
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    Default Re: Scout

    Well, sanding. Blocking everything out with the long boards to find the lows - the ones that aren't immediately visible. We have plenty of areas where we knew there would be some filler. But, in general the tub is taking the filler about where we thought it would. Nothing thicker than about 1/16" on the tub. The doors have some more: up to 1/8" on those. The doors were a mess. We had some "oil canning" of the skin from previous damage and repairs. We had to take the pointy hammer and shrink the stretched out spots (basically you whack the door skin where the stretch is with a donut dolly on the inside and the pointy hammer on the outside and intentionally make as many pock marks as you need to shrink the skin back to shape. Then you use the knurled hammer to flatten the pock marks. The real good guys can hammer the skin all the way back into shape. We got as close as we could and let the filler do the rest.)

    Anyway, after a couple of weeks of fill/sand/fill this is what the tub looks like:
    IMG_3095.JPG

    The garage shop is a dusty shambles - most of the filler ends up on the floor and all over everything:

    IMG_3093.JPG

    But the warmer weather lets us open the doors and get some fresh air.

    We are close to done with the hood. It came out pretty good, but it would have been worth our time to go fetch a perfect hood that was offered to us - even if it meant a 20 hours R/T. But some of the point is to restore *this* truck as opposed to source a bunch of great condition pieces and assemble them. That said, there will be pieces of 6-7 different Scouts in this one by the time we are done - some things were just too far gone to help. Anyway, here is the hood as it stands now - still some more finish work to be done:
    IMG_3097.JPG

    We also restored the dash pad. Ours was in really tough shape. Again, we could have sent it away to "just dashes" and had a pro restore it - but that would have cost upwards of $800. So, we tackled it ourselves.

    Close to the start - metal backing was rotted away and needed to be replaced:
    IMG_3079[1909].JPG

    We opened the cracks and scooped out the roached "padding":

    IMG_3090.JPG

    Filled with holes with pillar foam, filler and smoothed everything out:

    IMG_3092.JPG

    A few coats of epoxy primer:

    IMG_3098.JPG

    The we applied flocking. Flocking is the stuff that a lot of racecar manufacturer's use on their dashboards to keep down the glare. It also the stuff that GI Joe had for hair. We flocked the dashboard black and liked it a lot. We flocked the dash pad tan - hoping it would look classy like suede. It looks more like felt, but still pretty good. And a ton better than what we had.

    IMG_3099.JPGIMG_3100.JPGIMG_3101.JPG

    Yesterday we went and bought the rest of the paint we need. Epoxy over everything you see above. Then a coat of high-build primer. We will block the primer back down with 320 then 600 grit until we just kiss the underlying epoxy primer. That'll be as smooth as it gets. Then another coat of epoxy to seal the filler coat. Then the color - we are going to use single stage urethane. We didn't want to use a basecoat/clearcoat because 1 - we are amateurs and still trying to figure which end of the spray gun to point at the truck and 2 - we wanted a "duller" more stock appearance. The paint is still very expensive - though we did choose a "cheap" color.

    But - we re excited to see it in color. still plenty to do after that, but the pain will be a huge milestone.

    Enjoy your Memorial Day Holiday - thanks for looking. Bob & Finn
    Bob Spooner
    Departing from
    East Hampton, CT

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