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Thread: Gaulzetti

  1. #2161
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    Default Re: Gaulzetti

    Not a bad sunrise today.

     

  2. #2162
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    Default Re: Gaulzetti

    I don't believe perfection is attainable. Therefore, your bike does not exist.
     

  3. #2163
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    Default Re: Gaulzetti

    Quote Originally Posted by 72gmc View Post
    I don't believe perfection is attainable. Therefore, your bike does not exist.
    that's why matt mis-aligned the crank arms. wabi-sabi.
    Robert Kendrick


    my small corner of the poetry world:

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  4. #2164
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    Default Re: Gaulzetti

    SUMMER CYCLES on Instagram: “#gaulzetti #interclub #kermesse #kermis #racebike . this one was made for criterium racing but is equally at home in any hard fast ride.…”

    Hey Craig, can you tell us a little about this one?
    What informed the design choices, desired handling and ride characteristics etc?
     

  5. #2165
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    Default Re: Gaulzetti

    Quote Originally Posted by cs124 View Post
    SUMMER CYCLES on Instagram: “#gaulzetti #interclub #kermesse #kermis #racebike . this one was made for criterium racing but is equally at home in any hard fast ride.…”

    Hey Craig, can you tell us a little about this one?
    What informed the design choices, desired handling and ride characteristics etc?
    I'm hoping Craig chimes in on this one. He knows way more about it than I do. However I know a bit. I have the Lilliputian version:


    I had a Venge that I hated. The back wheel would skip and slide on the exit of corners. I had to think about setting up for corners. It was just a lousy bike. To quote my email to Criag: "I want this bike to be a tool for the job of racing criteriums. All else is secondary." Craig proposed the idea of using "kermis" geometry that he ran for races back in the day.

    The bike takes a shorter rake fork and steeper HTA and has some other geometric tweaks that I don't really understand - but they work and it's awesome. The bike is pretty high strung. It's not great to ride no-handed, it's not the bike I pick for base mile rides, and it's a bit nervous at slow speeds. However, it's without question the best bike I've used for short, fast racing. It corners like nothing else. Once you're at speed, it's stable but still turns on a dime.

    All of the drawbacks I mention above are pretty minor and were brought up by Craig well before I gave the go-ahead. I could be totally happy with this as my one road bike, but I enjoy an embarrassment of riches and have another excellent road bike for other occasions.

    I get tons of compliments on the paint. I gave Craig the two main colors and he just ran with it and came up with something way cooler than anything I would have come up with.

    As far as I know, the bike linked in that instagram post is a Craig-sized version of the same bike. It's a really cool take on what a road bike can be.
     

  6. #2166
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    Default Re: Gaulzetti

    @defspace That's a great looking bike!
     

  7. #2167
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    Default Re: Gaulzetti

    Quote Originally Posted by defspace View Post
    "I want this bike to be a tool for the job of racing criteriums. All else is secondary."
    I don't race any more, but I want a bike just like this!
     

  8. #2168
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    Default Re: Gaulzetti

    I totally forgot to post this picture last week. The emerald Corzo made yet another successful trip, this time to Colorado. I've bought a few replacements for this bike, but every time it ends up staying in the rotation. I just can't quit it.

     

  9. #2169
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    Default Re: Gaulzetti

    Defspace pretty much summed it up. I'll put it this way- a regular Inteclub makes a FAR better crit bike that that thing makes a regular race bike. I've been playing around with idea of building the ultimate short course crit bike. It's based around a bike I had in Belgium made by Eddy Merckx that was super weird- but not really that weird for the time. Basically there is a whole subculture of Pro bike racers who do nothing but race kermesses in Belgium. These races are generally short (under a 100km for sure) citerium races that take place as part of a bigger ghetto carnival and basically go around a town city center. The courses are generally pretty technical and employ a lot of hard corners and sometimes punchy little climbs- but more often they're flat and on crappy roads. Belgians will also employ really unsafe (to any reasonable person) things like weird funnels into super narrow alleys, a wooden saw horse in the middle of the road where a manhole is missing or something, and of course those dumb steel parade barriers that always have legs sticking out at the onset of a blind corner.

    Anyway- Belgians also race these things like there is a prize for 27th wheel of turn 7 on lap three. People are fighting for every position all the time. What this means in the real world is that you're taking every corner as fast as you can humanely take it. Road bikes as a rule always can corner faster when you're coasting through a corner- so a lot of guys racing these type of races had bikes designed specifically for these kind of races.

    I really think that I came up with something unique though with what I'm doing with these bikes. Basically- what I do is drop the bottom bracket- the bikes have really low bbs. This helps tremendously with cornering at speed. For people concerned about clipping a pedal- my response is that this bike is not for you- because you'll never be taking a corner slow enough where pedaling through a corner is an option.

    The next thing I do is put pretty long stays on the things. This is done for a couple of reasons- one being the fact that these frame generally employ a lot of setback and a low bb- so we need long stays so the tires fit. More importantly the long stays really help when you're jumping out of the saddle and sprinting up a cobbled hill out of a corner, or really any time you're being violent and not smooth during a tempo change. These bikes are going to have a rider's weight balance change a lot over the course of a race- and the long stays allow that to happen without the rear end bucking or bouncing or things starting to feel weird. In short- the long stays under hard acclerations make the bike more likely to stay planted.

    The next thing we do is keep the front center within a prescribed range that I needn't share here- but it does mean that these bikes are kind of specific like a downhill bike-or even a big enduro motorcycle- you either "fit" one of these things or you don't. With a regular road race bike- I have a much bigger range of appropriate places of where I can put the contact points- on these bikes I don't because they're limited by a narrower range of head angles and front centers. These bikes have VERY steep head angles coupled with forks with VERY little rake. This makes the bikes astounding at speed and basically nervously telepathic at speed and almost unrideable at low speeds. It's also not a bike that is easy to sit up- and say take a wind jacket on and off- The bike really goes where you want it before you even know that you want it there. I've been using track forks I like that I drill and bond in a sleeve to support brake bolts for a caliper brake- but I'm thinking about investing in a fork mold for discs and another for direct mount calipers.

    Regarding tubing- it's my proprietary stuff that I use for the Interclubs although I'm going to tend to select slightly stiffer tubes in general because I'm not all that concerned with ride comfort. I've also done these bikes in general with ISPs and stays low down on the seat tube. Why? lots of tiny technical reasons that I could go into- but you guys will think i'm full of shiite and i think i'd probably agree for the most part- so let's say its to differentiate the bikes aesthetically from the regular bikes.

    oh- and yes i'd be happy to make one out of carbon if you'd like. come on. send me money. let me build you the fuckking craziest best crit bike ever. these things really do work- and its absurd that no one else is doing this because these bikes work for the vast majority or races most folks in America do with road bikes.

    crits are still popular and cool!

    Hey Craig, can you tell us a little about this one?
    What informed the design choices, desired handling and ride characteristics etc?[/QUOTE]
    bamboo, aluminum, wood.

    My name is Craig Gaulzetti.

    www.summercycles.com

    www.gaulzetti.co

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    Default Re: Gaulzetti

    I think I would have liked one of those bikes 20y ago when we were racing crits on weekdays evenings in may to august in the Paris, brittany area and belgium fighting for those multiple prize moneys we got in intermediate sprints (sorta like a track point race but with money). It was fun.
    Last edited by sk_tle; 4 Days Ago at 09:26 AM.
    --
    T h o m a s

  11. #2171
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    Default Re: Gaulzetti

    Quote Originally Posted by sk_tle View Post
    I think I would have liked one of those bikes 20y ago when we were racing crits on weekdays evenings in may to august in the Paris, brittany area and belgium fighting for those multiple prize moneys we got in intermediate sprints (sorta like a track point race but with money). It was fun.
    Thomas:
    That's exactly what the bikes were designed for and are pretty good at. Same story for me exccept (gulp) it was almost 25 years ago.
    bamboo, aluminum, wood.

    My name is Craig Gaulzetti.

    www.summercycles.com

    www.gaulzetti.co

  12. #2172
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    Default Re: Gaulzetti

    @defspace and @jerk...absolutely enjoyed that background and follow-up narrative.
    What a terrific way to encourage future ownership. Those posts were great to read.
     

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