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Thread: Cycling Photography - Tips and Gear

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    Default Re: Cycling Photography - Tips and Gear

    Quote Originally Posted by xjoex View Post
    Billrick, I have an OM-D with the kit lens and a Lumix 14mm sitting on my desk now. I'm sending it to you if I can't get it to work!
    Thanks for pointing that camera out, it is really neat.

    -Joe
    My new OMD with 14-45 and 45-150 was at my desk when I got in this morning. The 14 should be here on Tuesday or so. "The Olympus OM-D, official camera of VSalon!"

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    Default Re: Cycling Photography - Tips and Gear

    Ahh, yeah. Now we're talking! And my new Canon S95 just arrived. (Thanks, right back at you, Joe!) My first photo with the S95 is below.

    As far as getting to know your new OMDs, my only suggestion is take your time. One of the incredible features of this camera is the ability to remap almost every button to new functions. If you have a pre-thought-out approach from an old camera, you might know what you want right away. I messed around to the point that I was forgetting what buttons did what. <factory reset>

    Pekka Potka has some good reading OMD materials. (Let me know if you find other good resources.) Here is his list of button functions, plus the grip:

    pekkapotka - Journal - Configuring the E-M5 --> Updated Feb29th

    My chest is aching, burns like a furnace
    the burning keeps me alive

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    Default Re: Cycling Photography - Tips and Gear

    Quote Originally Posted by false_aesthetic View Post
    Files:
    1) RAW over JPG
    2) Always shoot the largest JPG possible
    3) Set your white balance properly
    4) those stupid settings in your camera are really fucking stupid. if you want a picture to look cool, take a good picture, don't rely on the "fun" settings.

    Editing:
    1) Always perform capture sharpening
    2) always perform output sharpening
    3) you only have a certain amount of pixels in your camera (L x W = MP) 2" x 2" @ 144 dpi is the same as 4" x 4" @ 72 dpi. your file only looks bigger.
    4) upsizing is stupid. 2" x 2" @ 144 and turning it into 8" x 8" @ 144dpi means you "made up" data. your image will look like shit.
    Grazie for your insight....but call me dumb (but behind my back please...I am sensitive) but this is like another language n'est pas. I really need to read my digital cameras for dumb-asses book.

    I am serious- I have no clue what upszing is. Or the pixel thing- I can not find the button for it on my g9 (love that camera- even though it is soo much more than I need...actually I do wish it took pictures faster.)
     

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    Default Re: Cycling Photography - Tips and Gear

    I thought s110 was a typo until I looked - I swear the s100 just came out

    I wish the price of the s95 would plummet but the s series are holding their prices pretty well
     

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    Default Re: Cycling Photography - Tips and Gear

    Hit the bike park on the way home and snapped a couple of shots with the OM-D.


    -Joe

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    Default Re: Cycling Photography - Tips and Gear

    Quote Originally Posted by billrick View Post
    Fantastic tips, Coolberto! I'm going to have to re-shoot some bike portraits using your pointers.

    Here is a photo from the Colnago thread that seems to exemplify your suggestions. I hope WillyGil will stop by to comment on how he set this one up. (Check out his Flickr page if you haven't seen it. Brilliant.) This shot almost looks like HDR, but I think it is natural lighting. I don't see any fill flash highlights, either. Diffuser maybe?

    Shots like this Colnago would be great with the Brenizer Effect if you've got the gear to do it.
     

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    Default Re: Cycling Photography - Tips and Gear

    Quote Originally Posted by the bottle ride View Post
    Grazie for your insight....but call me dumb (but behind my back please...I am sensitive) but this is like another language n'est pas. I really need to read my digital cameras for dumb-asses book.

    I am serious- I have no clue what upszing is. Or the pixel thing- I can not find the button for it on my g9 (love that camera- even though it is soo much more than I need...actually I do wish it took pictures faster.)

    Files:
    JPG is probably the most common image file. It is a compressed file. RAW images store image data pixel by pixel and do it in 16-bit color (pong = 2-bit (b/w) nintendo = 8-bit (256 colors) , super nintendo = 16-bit (65,000 colors) ). JPG (stands for joint photographic experts group IIRC) looks at color and says something like, "This pixel and this pixel are ultramarine and cornflower blue, that's too complicated, I'm gonna call them BLUE." and then says, "I see 4 pixels that are BLUE. I shouldn't have to write (X,Y) = blue, (X,Y) = blue, (X,Y) = blue, (X,Y) = blue when I can say (X,Y) through (X, Y) = blue. Data is compressed and simplified to give you a smaller (less accurate) file. Another way to think about this is like bread: its more enjoyable to eat a slice of bread compared to crushing a piece of bread in your hand into a lump and then eating it. DIG?

    Sharpening: When light travels it scatters. The lens on your camera (or a small hole in a wall) does a good job of collecting and redistributing light against a surface (CCD or CMOS chip in your case). But because light is traveling through several surfaces and substances (multiple panes of glass, air, CCD glass and CCD) the light gets unsharp (this is different than blurry).

    This happens in all processes. Unsharp masking is a technique used to boost the contrast between film grain (or pixels) thereby making it appear as if an image is sharper than it actually is.

    Capture sharpening refers to the process of sharpening an image once you get it off the camera and in front of you on GIMP or photoshop, lightroom, camera RAW etc. You are sharpening the image in order to undo the inherent unsharpness of the image.

    Output sharpening is the process of sharpening an image before you print it out. Remember when you used to play with felt tipped pens and napkins and the ink would bleed out making your line less than perfect? Same thing happens when droplets of ink hit paper. Photo paper is coated with a wonderful substance that tries to minimize this effect (its called dot gain) and printers now use picoliter droplets -- 0.000000000001/liter -- to minimize it but dot gain still happens. Applying a 2nd sharpening pass over-corrects the file in order to make it appear sharp in the print.

    Megabits/pixel size.
    Let's say you have a CCD that is 1" x 1" and its segmented into 10 wide/high. Let's call those segments pixels. (each pixel has a X, Y coordinate just like on a graph). You'd have 100 pixels.
    When you represent an image on a screen or on a print we talk about DPI or PPI (dots per inch/pixels per inch... technically prints have DPI and monitors have PPI but everyone usually uses DPI). So your CCD has a resolution of 10 dpi. If you were to multiply the L and W by 2 your would get a 2" x 2" image. The DPI would no longer be 10 though because you now have to stretch 10 pixels another inch. Your dpi goes down to 5 dpi. If you were to multiply the L and W by .5 your dpi would now be 20 dpi. No matter what, you would have 100 pixels.

    Now here's where it gets confusing. Monitors tend to display images at 72 dpi. This looks great to our eyes. But when you print out something at 72 dpi it looks like complete fucking shit. On an Epson printer the optimal resolutions (DPI) are 180, 240 and 360 dpi (2.5, 3.33 and 5x greater dpi respectively). Lets assume you have a new CCD and its and it is 1000 pixels L and W. You now have 1 million pixels (its 1 megapixel). If you display your image at 72 dpi your image will by 13.889" x 13.889" (1000 / 72). But you wanna print out the image so you change the DPI to 180. Your image size will now be 5.55" x 5.55" @ 180dpi. (@ 240dpi it'd be 4.16 x 4.16; @ 360dpi it'd be 2.77"x2.77").

    But your wife wants a 10x10" image. You know that you *should* print at 180 dpi so you reize the image and this time, tell PS to keep the DPI at 180 and just make the L and W bigger. Instead of simply putting more space between the pixels (stretching them) PS says, "WHAT THE PISS? There's no fucking data there. Well, I'll just making something up." Now your image is 10" x 10" @ 180 dpi. You now have 1800 pixels x 1800 pixels. That means you have 3.24 million pixels (3.24 megapix). How? You didn't capture that information when you took the picture. Computers are programmed with numbers not magic. Etc. You just made your computer lie.

    Here's the problem. You might not see it at first but once you know what to look for, you will see it. It doesn't take skill or talent to see, everyone can see it and that looks like CRAP.

    So, when I say, if you're just viewing an image on screen, MP doesn't matter, it really doesn't---a 2mp image can fill a 17" screen quite well. However, if you print that shit out, you're gonna get really nice 2x3" images and crap if you print lager. 8mp will give you a good 8x10 and a 40% good 11x14". My D800 (36MP) gives me a superb 24x36" print. But if I used that setting to make all my pictures, it'd take a stupid amount of time for facebook or flicker to load.

    Dig?




    PS. This lecture usually takes me 2.5 hours to give. I've omitted a metricfucktonne of info and simplified things. You wouldn't expect Dave Kirk to teach me fillet brazing over the internet would you?
    elysian
    Tom Tolhurst

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    Default Re: Cycling Photography - Tips and Gear

    Quote Originally Posted by false_aesthetic View Post
    [...]

    PS. This lecture usually takes me 2.5 hours to give. I've omitted a metricfucktonne of info and simplified things. You wouldn't expect Dave Kirk to teach me fillet brazing over the internet would you?
    this. is. awesome.
    you are a generous man

    guys, it took me years to put this all together on my own--read and re-read yo
     

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    Default Re: Cycling Photography - Tips and Gear

    The other cool thing about shooting in RAW is that you don't really need to worry about white balance. You also have to remember to sharpen and do noise reduction (it's easy) to the RAW files because they haven't been fully processed by the camera.
     

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    Default Re: Cycling Photography - Tips and Gear

    These posts are amazing.

    To add some substance: I'm going for either an E-PL3 or Sony NEX-C3 as a "jersey pocket-able" mirrorless camera. I went to B&H the other day and it is a good thing they're closed for various religious holidays. The Olympus feels much better to use but the Sony is a bit smaller and holy crap, APS-C in such a tiny camera. Both with respective pancake lenses.
     

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    Default Re: Cycling Photography - Tips and Gear

    Quote Originally Posted by lukasz View Post
    These posts are amazing.

    To add some substance: I'm going for either an E-PL3 or Sony NEX-C3 as a "jersey pocket-able" mirrorless camera. I went to B&H the other day and it is a good thing they're closed for various religious holidays. The Olympus feels much better to use but the Sony is a bit smaller and holy crap, APS-C in such a tiny camera. Both with respective pancake lenses.
    One thing to keep in mind with all the m4/3rds cameras - they are the same depth, at least at the mount. It's already as thin as it can go on most of the bodies, so on cameras like the EPM-1 (the pen mini whatever it is called) its a tiny body everywhere EXCEPT the mount. Also, they just announced the EPL-5 which has the OM-D's improved sensor.

    For my money, I'll probably get an EPL-1 body, which is about $120 on eBay refurbished right now, and the 15/8 lens cap lens for a on the bike camera. Under $200 and the lens looks pretty good from what I've seen (linked above). If not that lens than the 14/2.5, which is $170 on eBay (new take offs from kits) and I already have a copy of, or on the way at least. I haven't carried my X100 much on rides, and I doubt I'll carry the OMD much, just because of the replacement cost. I'd really hate to crunch a $1K camera, and I'd rather not ruin it by sweating on it. The EPL-1 fits the bill, to me at least, of a good yet cheap camera.

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    Default Re: Cycling Photography - Tips and Gear

    I took the OM-D out on two hikes and a ride today. On the hike I used the 12-50mm lens, used the Panasonic 14mm/2.5 on the ride. On the ride I carried it in my camelback in a case I made last night. I would not carry it in a jersey pocket, but no worries about carrying in in a camelback.

    With the 14/2.5 it is a really small package.

    -Joe

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    Default Re: Cycling Photography - Tips and Gear

    Quote Originally Posted by cody.wms View Post
    One thing to keep in mind with all the m4/3rds cameras - they are the same depth, at least at the mount. It's already as thin as it can go on most of the bodies, so on cameras like the EPM-1 (the pen mini whatever it is called) its a tiny body everywhere EXCEPT the mount. Also, they just announced the EPL-5 which has the OM-D's improved sensor.

    For my money, I'll probably get an EPL-1 body, which is about $120 on eBay refurbished right now, and the 15/8 lens cap lens for a on the bike camera. Under $200 and the lens looks pretty good from what I've seen (linked above). If not that lens than the 14/2.5, which is $170 on eBay (new take offs from kits) and I already have a copy of, or on the way at least. I haven't carried my X100 much on rides, and I doubt I'll carry the OMD much, just because of the replacement cost. I'd really hate to crunch a $1K camera, and I'd rather not ruin it by sweating on it. The EPL-1 fits the bill, to me at least, of a good yet cheap camera.
    That's really helpful. Thanks.

    Is cost the only reason you wouldn't go for the E-PL3? It seems to be a faster camera (autofocus and continuous shooting) and a bit smaller/lighter. And you're right, I wouldn't take the OMD on a ride, either! I don't need much camera but I know what I'd like out of one: fast operation compared to point and shoot, ability to add a viewfinder, portability.

    And about the Sony: you don't think the larger sensor size is worth buying such an... oddball (for lack of a better word) camera? I don't like the lack of dials but the menu system seemed fine when I played with it.

    Under $200 is damn tempting though! I can probably find a pretty good deal on an E-PL3 body in the next few weeks with the E-PL5 coming out, too. I'll keep my eyes open.
     

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    Default Re: Cycling Photography - Tips and Gear

    I think buy the best camera you can afford to drop while pedaling at the average speed on your Garmin.
     

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    Default Re: Cycling Photography - Tips and Gear

    Haha. The only thing that's ever fallen off my bike has been my Garmin. No way am I fumbling with a camera while in motion.
     

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    Default Re: Cycling Photography - Tips and Gear

    While we're on the subject of camera recommendations...turning away from on-the-bike cameras though:

    I have a 4 year old Canon G10 which I am thinking about replacing.
    Looking for something in the same ballpark size-wise (ie: not a DSLR) and I'm thinking that M43 is possibly the way to go. I love the G10, but it seems like the new G15 wouldn't be leaps and bounds better, and the G1X reviews look to be underwhelming given the price. The EOS-M looks pretty cool but advanced controls are minimal without diving into the menus, not to mention another new lens-mount system. (These appear to be the bottom brackets of the camera world, no?)

    Lots of recos for the older Olympus M43's, but I'm wondering about the 2 new ones that have the OMD sensor? Are they a huge leap forward? I'm looking to buy something that will keep me happy for another 3-4 years.
    The Panasonic GX1 also looks interesting.
    my name is Matt

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    Default Re: Cycling Photography - Tips and Gear

    Quote Originally Posted by lukasz View Post
    That's really helpful. Thanks.

    Is cost the only reason you wouldn't go for the E-PL3? It seems to be a faster camera (autofocus and continuous shooting) and a bit smaller/lighter. And you're right, I wouldn't take the OMD on a ride, either! I don't need much camera but I know what I'd like out of one: fast operation compared to point and shoot, ability to add a viewfinder, portability.

    And about the Sony: you don't think the larger sensor size is worth buying such an... oddball (for lack of a better word) camera? I don't like the lack of dials but the menu system seemed fine when I played with it.

    Under $200 is damn tempting though! I can probably find a pretty good deal on an E-PL3 body in the next few weeks with the E-PL5 coming out, too. I'll keep my eyes open.
    Yeah, it is price for me. When I say "on-the-bike" what I mean is a camera I'll haul around with me when commuting, running errands, etc. Like xJoex, I don't mind throwing it in a camelbak and taking it on a hike or a longer ride if I know I'll be stopping to take pics. Some of my rides are frankly, uninteresting. Look another tear down McMansion in the Virginia suburbs!

    I have a small bias against Sony. I have one of their Blu-Ray players, and I think it is typical Sony thinking - Want to access Netflix on it? Select the Netflix icon *Checks for network connection*, select the icon again *ensures there is an internet connection, in a three step process*, select icon again, go to Netflix... Most people I know that have Sony computers curse them, too. But camera wise, the big thing is the lack of lenses. When you're buying into something like this, you kinda hope that the lenses will be good for quite a long time, but you'll replace the body periodically, but Sony only has SEVEN lenses. They now have more bodies in the NEX line than lenses.

    Quote Originally Posted by xjoex View Post
    I took the OM-D out on two hikes and a ride today. On the hike I used the 12-50mm lens, used the Panasonic 14mm/2.5 on the ride. On the ride I carried it in my camelback in a case I made last night.
    Pics of said case, pls.

    Quote Originally Posted by robin3mj View Post
    While we're on the subject of camera recommendations...turning away from on-the-bike cameras though:

    I have a 4 year old Canon G10 which I am thinking about replacing.
    Looking for something in the same ballpark size-wise (ie: not a DSLR) and I'm thinking that M43 is possibly the way to go. I love the G10, but it seems like the new G15 wouldn't be leaps and bounds better, and the G1X reviews look to be underwhelming given the price. The EOS-M looks pretty cool but advanced controls are minimal without diving into the menus, not to mention another new lens-mount system. (These appear to be the bottom brackets of the camera world, no?)

    Lots of recos for the older Olympus M43's, but I'm wondering about the 2 new ones that have the OMD sensor? Are they a huge leap forward? I'm looking to buy something that will keep me happy for another 3-4 years.
    The Panasonic GX1 also looks interesting.
    You should check out the OM-D. It's not very big, even with the viewfinder. And the rebates running through the 13th help, though I found that the price difference between the Olympus store and Amazon was almost the same after Olympus added tax. And the OM-D sensor is really nice, and would be a step up from what's out there, though the older ones are good as long as you don't push the ISO too far.

    All of the stuff from 30 Sept in my photostream (below) was shot with my OM-D, though I'll probably go back and re-process these things sometime soon.

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    Default Re: Cycling Photography - Tips and Gear

    Great info from Cody.

    For me, when choosing between the Sony NEX and M43 Olympus OMD, the choice came down to form factor and number of available lenses. At the time, the NEX was the king of image quality and the OMD was a brand-new unknown. I went with the OMD because I was more comfortable with the traditional camera body. Before you buy, try the NEX 6/7 off-center viewfinder. The lens handling also felt awkward to me. (YMMV of course.) The clincher was that the M43 system had more lenses available. Okay, and I did have some nostalgia for the old OM film cameras that I lusted for as a kid.

    My gamble with the OMD really paid off on IQ - it has been stellar. The sensor turned out to be a Sony product. Probably not the same IQ as the NEX sensors, but close. And now Sony has purchased a 11% interest in Olympus, forming a partnership for future cameras.

    Bottom line, if this is going to be your primary camera, I think it is worth the dollars for the newer models with the Sony/OMD sensor.
     

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    Default Re: Cycling Photography - Tips and Gear

    Hey Billrick - What is that strap you have on your OMD in that pick? I have been using a Domke 1" STRAP W/O SWIVEL 6-NAVY , but think a wrist strap would be better.

    -Joe

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    Default Re: Cycling Photography - Tips and Gear

    It is a Gordy strap: gordy's camera straps

    The camera is too substantial for a wrist strap, but my old DSLR straps are just overkill. Thinking about making something in the middle out of paracord.
     

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