User Tag List

Page 12 of 18 FirstFirst ... 23456789101112131415161718 LastLast
Results 221 to 240 of 357

Thread: Cycling Photography - Tips and Gear

  1. #221
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    1,746
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Cycling Photography - Tips and Gear

    what about a Hasselblad on bike tours? ;)

     

  2. #222
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Long Island, NY
    Posts
    1,706
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Cycling Photography - Tips and Gear

    Quote Originally Posted by StR View Post
    what about a Hasselblad on bike tours? ;)
    I wish you hadn't posted that!

    Every three years or so, I crave film. Lately Ive been missing my Leica M6 and 35 'cron, which I sold a couple of years ago. Looking at the prices of the used stuff, it strikes me that you can get a Hassy 500cm with an 80mm lens and a back for the price of the M6 alone. But it's not exactly compact or inconspicuous. The Leica and Zeiss glass render beautifully, just wish there was a compact and not bank-breaking digital body to attach it to…….or maybe I need a bigger bag and start carrying a 6x6.

  3. #223
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    1,746
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Cycling Photography - Tips and Gear

    Iam feeling sad! the last days I was looking for a print, I know it is somewhere in the boxes, while checking the boxes I got more and more sad... wonderful fibre paper prints coming out of them....
    until today I have not seen a digital b/w print what matches the tones of a well done fiber paper print.
    so if film then also dark room! thats means? many many hours in the dark room, less cycling....
    right now I prefer cycling, with a tear in the eyes, when looking at these prints. ;)
     

  4. #224
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Noblesville, Indiana, United States
    Posts
    1,795
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Cycling Photography - Tips and Gear

    I think the darkroom left a long time before film. There aren't many who are controlling the process start to finish anymore.
     

  5. #225
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Humboldt County
    Posts
    979
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Cycling Photography - Tips and Gear

    I just broke my old Sony Cybershot point and shoot. Joostx recommended a Sony RX100 to me after I gave him some compliments on his recent ride photos and I shrugged... The iPhone is with me more often. I'm looking at a Panasonic Lumix LF1 to replace the old camera-- this new large sensor thing is pretty intriguing but I don't have the dough to splash out for even an older RX100 right now.
     

  6. #226
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    15,889
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    9 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Cycling Photography - Tips and Gear

    I just saw today that the Leica M9, ME, and M-Monochrom are all developing corrosion on the glass that covers the sensor. Not an if but a when. The only cure is replacement. Leica is figuring out a remedy that won't cause too many hysterics. Whew! I guess I dodged a bullet not being able to afford one of those, eh?

    I miss B&W 120 film in HC-110. Silly contact prints on cheap Foma paper, then glued to cardboard. Magical. And those weren't even good prints. Good prints take your breath away.
    Jorn Ake
    poet

    Flickr
    Books

  7. #227
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Long Island, NY
    Posts
    1,706
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Cycling Photography - Tips and Gear

    Quote Originally Posted by j44ke View Post
    I just saw today that the Leica M9, ME, and M-Monochrom are all developing corrosion on the glass that covers the sensor. Not an if but a when. The only cure is replacement. Leica is figuring out a remedy that won't cause too many hysterics. Whew! I guess I dodged a bullet not being able to afford one of those, eh?

    I miss B&W 120 film in HC-110. Silly contact prints on cheap Foma paper, then glued to cardboard. Magical. And those weren't even good prints. Good prints take your breath away.
    Nice to know. I'll refrain from selling a kidney for an M240 and get a used Hassy instead.

    All joking aside I don't remember having such issues with film cameras. I was reading reviews at B&H of one of the more reasonably priced Nikon FF cameras and every other review was about oil stains on the sensor. Stuff like this doesn't make sense to me. At $7k or eve 2000 for a body, there should be mechanical and electronic perfection.

  8. #228
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    15,889
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    9 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Cycling Photography - Tips and Gear

    Back in the day, you worried about pinholes in shutter curtains, fungus in lenses and precipitate in development water. And any other innumberable things. Digital photography is loads more dependable, but it definitely isn't perfect.

    There is a photographer named Gordon Stettinius, I think. For a while he was taking photos with his iPhone, creating negatives from those images in Photoshop, printing them onto transparency, and then contact printing them on real photo paper. Pretty amazing.
    Jorn Ake
    poet

    Flickr
    Books

  9. #229
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Conway, South Caroina
    Posts
    102
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Cycling Photography - Tips and Gear

    Quote Originally Posted by j44ke View Post
    Back in the day, you worried about pinholes in shutter curtains, fungus in lenses and precipitate in development water. And any other innumberable things. Digital photography is loads more dependable, but it definitely isn't perfect.
    I know pinholes in shutter curtains...somewhere in my stash of photographica is a bottle of what looks like black fingernail polish, but is black rubberized cement for sealing pinholes in shutter curtains. I've sealed a bunch of them, from old Leicas to Speed Graphics.

    I got interested in photography quite young, and had a Canon F1 at age 13, in 1973....also at age 13, I stated to anyone who would listen I would do photography and have a camera store one day. My wife & I met in photography school. I am very old school in some respects; I ran a "real" camera shop from 1980-88, and owned my own from 1988-1998-I saw digital on the horizon, and sold the store. I miss some aspects of the craft of hand-processing; I used to mix B&W chemicals to develop film...kept metol, hydroquinone, etc. in the darkroom to mix just the right magic developer (really just fooling myself, what I made wasn't really a better formulation, just different). I did retouching with an Adams negative retoucher, used both a Beseler 45 and an Omega D2XL with cold light sources, bla, bla, bla. Used a Wista 8x10 and contact printed the negs (never could justify an 8x10 enlarger)....for 4x5 used Linhof & a Sinar P2...Hasselblads, Leica M & R series, in other words, a bunch of good stuff.

    The reason for this discourse is that no matter the tool used to capture the image, nothing trumps the holy trinity of the right subject, right light, and right time of day.

    A customer who was not at all into photography, came into our shop. Her purpose was to get outfitted with photo gear for an upcoming trip of a lifetime. After asking all the right questions of her, I knew she wouldn't work well with a "real" camera, so we sold her Kodak disposable cameras, and advised her to buy them during her trip, then bring them all to us for development. Don't get me wrong, she had money to spend, and was ready to go home with whatever price point of camera I thought would be best....for her, the disposable camera was the best fit.

    Trip over, she brought in copious quantities of the little yellow Kodaks. We always tried to help our customers take better pictures, or create better images, by going over their images with them....we had an 8 foot light table to view slides and the same space for print viewing. Looking over her hundreds of images, it was apparent that she wasn't gifted with an eye for photography....she could have taken a Leica, and had just as lousy composition, and been just as oblivious to lighting. Except one. Yes, one. One image, out hundreds. Right subject, right light, right time of day. It was "Karsh-like"...a portrait the stopped you, pulled you in...simply captivating...with a Kodak disposable camera. It was so dynamic, we suggested she enter in in the local Kodak International Snapshot Awards, the "KINSA"-she won; she entered regionally-she won; she won nationally...crazy.

    She took the prize money from the award, and spent it with us on a "real" camera outfit, against our council. She was convinced she was a photographer....that was not the case...she took all of the classes I taught; didn't help. After a few months, the camera outfit took up residence in the top shelf of her closet.

    With all that said, I don't try to seek perfection in any endeavor...I'm just happy to participate. I know I'm just as ungifted in many things I try as my customer in this story.
    I'm guilty of using my iPhone as my primary camera...truth be known, it is much better tool that what my customer used to win the KINSA. Nothing beats the right subject, right light, and right time of day.
    Jon Stone. Raconteur, Bon Vivant, Wabibito.

  10. #230
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Vancouver, WA
    Posts
    398
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Cycling Photography - Tips and Gear

    I rented and enjoyed 5 days with a Ricoh GR. A few postings here and there regarding the infiltrating of dust or lint to internals of the lens ultimately scared me off. Traded in two nice Nikon lenses and a D50 body and brought home an X100T. Subsequently stopped off at the North St shop and grabbed a handlebar pouch with strap, to carry sling style while out on me two wheel wanderings...
     

  11. #231
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    1,388
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Cycling Photography - Tips and Gear

    You'll love the X100. I had one at launch at it served me well for a few years until the itch and need for other focal lengths kicked in.
    My name is Hung | Instagram | Website/portfolio

  12. #232
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    1,746
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Cycling Photography - Tips and Gear

    Quote Originally Posted by Craig Ryan View Post
    I think the darkroom left a long time before film. There aren't many who are controlling the process start to finish anymore.
    and even less who know how to do a top print;)
     

  13. #233
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    1,388
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Cycling Photography - Tips and Gear

    I'm curious how others are carrying pocketable cameras (think Canon S100s, Panasonic LX-7s, RX100s etc.) on rides. Do you guys just stuff them into a jersey pocket? My main concern is the condensation from sweat and the optics getting fogged up.

    I used to use a Soul Run camera sleeve, but found that moisture was was still able to get through the outer fabric and am now resorting to the lowly zip-loc bag, but that makes quick grabs of the camera a bit more cumbersome.
    My name is Hung | Instagram | Website/portfolio

  14. #234
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Brooklyn, NY
    Posts
    724
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Cycling Photography - Tips and Gear

    Quote Originally Posted by hmai18 View Post
    I'm curious how others are carrying pocketable cameras (think Canon S100s, Panasonic LX-7s, RX100s etc.) on rides. Do you guys just stuff them into a jersey pocket? My main concern is the condensation from sweat and the optics getting fogged up.
    Valid concern, and hence why I never carry my ride camera (Lumix LX5) in a jersey pocket - I wear it slung across my body, lens cap removed. Any camera with two strap lugs sound be fine for this, and even if you only have one lug you could always get a tripod-socket-mounted strap (C-Loop Mini or similar) if preferable.
    The camera never actually gets in my way, but if it swings in front of me too much during descents I'll push it around my back. Strap is kept relatively short, but long enough to raise the camera to my eye whilst riding.
    Looking to update to an RX100 Mk2 that I'll treat the same way.
    Neil

  15. #235
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    1,388
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Cycling Photography - Tips and Gear

    With it slung across your body, where does it usually settle/rest?
    My name is Hung | Instagram | Website/portfolio

  16. #236
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    4,687
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Cycling Photography - Tips and Gear

    Quote Originally Posted by hmai18 View Post
    I'm curious how others are carrying pocketable cameras (think Canon S100s, Panasonic LX-7s, RX100s etc.) on rides. Do you guys just stuff them into a jersey pocket? My main concern is the condensation from sweat and the optics getting fogged up.

    I used to use a Soul Run camera sleeve, but found that moisture was was still able to get through the outer fabric and am now resorting to the lowly zip-loc bag, but that makes quick grabs of the camera a bit more cumbersome.
    Yeah we designed that to be a balance of speed of access and water resistance. I carry my small camera in a lowepro bag on my hydro pack straps. But I found was carrying my EM5 in a backpack with a camera bag inside... total hassle to grab. But I got a MindShift Trail pack and I cannot say enough good things about it. It really is an amazing pack that lets you grab your camera without taking the pack off and protects the camera at the same time.




    Totally psyched on it. No more missed shots because I couldn't grab the camera in time.

    PS I have the 17mm F1.8 Olympus and 40-150 for sale CHEAP send me a PM.

    -Joe

  17. #237
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Long Island, NY
    Posts
    1,706
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Cycling Photography - Tips and Gear

    Quote Originally Posted by hmai18 View Post
    I'm curious how others are carrying pocketable cameras (think Canon S100s, .
    I have an S100. My preferred method is to stash it in a top-tube pouch like this. If I'm traveling light, I may throw it in the jersey pocket but it gets covered in body moisture. I admire people who ride with Leicas and such slung over their shoulder but I'd be concerned that one little misstep (slip and fall, collision) would mean the end of the camera.

  18. #238
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    1,388
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Cycling Photography - Tips and Gear

    Quote Originally Posted by xjoex View Post
    PS I have the 17mm F1.8 Olympus and 40-150 for sale CHEAP send me a PM.
    Thanks Joe, but I actually have an OM-D, though I mainly use it for off-camera shooting. Having come directly from an X100 before it, I thought I would love the 17mm, but it wasn't wide enough for sports coverage and wasn't tight enough for portraits, so I ended up selling it in favour of a Panasonic-Leica 25mm.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bobonli View Post
    I have an S100. My preferred method is to stash it in a top-tube pouch like this.
    My worry about any sort of pouch is that the camera is not physically attached to my body and I risk fumbling it as I try and take/remove it from the pouch. Right now, I carry it on a sling around my chest with the camera in a pocket, which lets me reach back and grab it and never worry about dropping it. It sounds like I just need to find a better sling solution that'll keep it out of my pocket, but close to my body so it's not bouncing around.
    My name is Hung | Instagram | Website/portfolio

  19. #239
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Long Island, NY
    Posts
    1,706
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Cycling Photography - Tips and Gear

    Quote Originally Posted by hmai18 View Post
    My worry about any sort of pouch is that the camera is not physically attached to my body and I risk fumbling it as I try and take/remove it from the pouch. Right now, I carry it on a sling around my chest with the camera in a pocket, which lets me reach back and grab it and never worry about dropping it. It sounds like I just need to find a better sling solution that'll keep it out of my pocket, but close to my body so it's not bouncing around.
    I haven't dropped the camera yet using this procedure: Unzip pouch >>hand goes into strap >> remove camera and shoot >> camera back into pouch >> remove hand and zip the pouch

    My other concern about wearing the camera is damage to my body should I have an impact. Although not widely discussed in cycling literature, there's a lot of stuff in the motorcycle accident literature about things carried next to the body becoming part of the body in a crash.

  20. #240
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Brooklyn, NY
    Posts
    724
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Cycling Photography - Tips and Gear

    Quote Originally Posted by hmai18 View Post
    With it slung across your body, where does it usually settle/rest?
    I keep the strap short so it's sitting against the lower left edge of my ribcage.
    When in the drops, it sometimes wants to slip forward and bash the stem/TT, but only if the grippy side of the strap isn't rubber-side-down.
    I usually push the camera round onto my back if using the drops for an extended period.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bobonli
    I have an S100. My preferred method is to stash it in a top-tube pouch like this.
    A friend has bought something similar recently for his RX100 - Topeak® Cycling Accessories — Products - Tri DryBag (2)
    I have to admit, it's a great idea and keeps the camera a lot safer than my method. I just think I'd use it less if it were tucked away like that.
    Neil

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 10-03-2011, 05:59 PM
  2. best cycling tips
    By dave1215 in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 45
    Last Post: 04-22-2011, 04:47 PM

Bookmarks

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •