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Thread: How to fold a tubular

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    Too Tall's Avatar
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    Default How to fold a tubular

    I took these pic.s last yr. This is one way to do it. Spares have useable glue on them so you can ride them without losing your mind. This requires you to periodically unroll the tyre and check the glue. Depending on conditions you might only have to freshen up the glue twice a yr. Also, use a good toe strap. Press the folded tyre flat and compress...repeat...you'll "convince" a new spare to assume a nice shape after a couple tries ;) Enjoy.
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    agilismerlin is offline VSalonistas
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    This is how I have mine. I carry this in my back pocket solely because I like to lift my bikes a few times senza/sans/ohne water bottles, pumps and spares just to impress myself with how light they are.

    But sometimes I put in on with a toe strap too.

    Too Tall is showing one good method. And his advice with the glue is to be followed. By others. If I get a flat I will nurse it home and deal with it. No fast corners for me.

    I use a Sprinter because I got it free (yes, it does hold air) and because it has a butyl tube inside. And won't dry rot as fast as a Veloflex spare.

    This is kept on the shelf and grabbed if I am using one of my two tubular-equipped rides here in MichMich.
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    My name is James Edward Kile

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    I thought you were smuggling bananas.

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    All these recent posts with good how to on tubulars are taking away the mystique and scariness. You guys are slowly pushing me to the dark side. I ordered my first set of tubular wheels, tires, glue, and tape. Im going to give them I try for cross. If I survive, I may have to try a set on the road this spring. Those rolled up tubular tires in the pictures above dont look like much more to carry than the tube and tire levers in packing around now.

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    They are not hard to carry. But real men carry them like this.



    My name is James Edward Kile

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    Mr.President is offline VSalonistas
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saab2000 View Post
    They are not hard to carry. But real men carry them like this.




    Yeah but think of how that would mess up some of the Rapha clothing, and god forbid that stuff gets dirty. :D

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    Default I like TooTalls Fold

    But...To be really PRO...You wrap the tire, folded, in an old race number, then under the saddle. Stops the toe strap from wearing on the tire side walls. Insulation against road vibration.

    The way I was taught. Worked for me 'till I gave those things up.

    Or, there is the new PRO way...

    http://sveltecycles.blogspot.com/200...-on-edges.html

    Thanks to JS for the info. I made one, works great with clincher spares too.
    Last edited by RIHans; 09-09-2008 at 03:20 AM.

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    just looking through - concep 2 skulls on the floor.
    do you row?

    ronnie

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    Quote Originally Posted by ron l edmiston View Post
    just looking through - concep 2 skulls on the floor.
    do you row?

    ronnie
    Busted! Yup. I row a Hudson and a Peinert. Those oars "came with" the Hudson apparently they are junk or so folks tell me...what do I know?

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    one of the best set of skulls or sweeps manufactured.
    i row a vandusen.
    always wanted to be the "coxswain" for a lady eight - wife says "no!"



    ronnie

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    themanmonkey is offline VSalonistas
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    Too Tall I know your method and have used it back in the day, but it has one major flaw. If you actually have "usable glue" on the tire that glue will transfer to the tire surface. Glue on the riding surface is a bad thing I'm sure you can imagine. This is the main reason for the tri-fold method agilismerlin showed. Also before storing your tire under the seat stuff it in a ziplock bag and you're be much happier when change time happens.

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    Quote Originally Posted by themanmonkey View Post
    Too Tall I know your method and have used it back in the day, but it has one major flaw. If you actually have "usable glue" on the tire that glue will transfer to the tire surface. Glue on the riding surface is a bad thing I'm sure you can imagine. This is the main reason for the tri-fold method agilismerlin showed. Also before storing your tire under the seat stuff it in a ziplock bag and you're be much happier when change time happens.
    Is that what you do as well?
    It really can be a pickle if you have glue to glue contact (pic of the method you've described below). The glue never really sticks to the tyre surface and any that does is never a problem. Heck I'm all ears, learn me.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Too Tall View Post
    Is that what you do as well?
    It really can be a pickle if you have glue to glue contact (pic of the method you've described below). The glue never really sticks to the tyre surface and any that does is never a problem. Heck I'm all ears, learn me.
    I don't do anymore, but rode sew-ups for 20 years and still equip lots of folks bikes with them. I usually roll it tighter like Saab2000's pic, but basically the same tri-fold method. Try not to expose the glue. Glue to glue contact has never been a problem that I've ever seen, but glue on the tire can be. One it can, and will, pick up rocks and junk that will flat you. I used to repair lots of tires with this problem. Of course it also depends on the glue Clement red is a big problem, thin Continental not so much. Also if you have glue on your tire surface it won't "stick" to the road as well. Glue may be sticky but not to the road surface. Beyond that it just looks bad. Kinda like some one who has their cables capped off 6" past the binder.

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    Quote Originally Posted by themanmonkey View Post
    I don't do anymore, but rode sew-ups for 20 years and still equip lots of folks bikes with them. I usually roll it tighter like Saab2000's pic, but basically the same tri-fold method. Try not to expose the glue. Glue to glue contact has never been a problem that I've ever seen, but glue on the tire can be. One it can, and will, pick up rocks and junk that will flat you. I used to repair lots of tires with this problem. Of course it also depends on the glue Clement red is a big problem, thin Continental not so much. Also if you have glue on your tire surface it won't "stick" to the road as well. Glue may be sticky but not to the road surface. Beyond that it just looks bad. Kinda like some one who has their cables capped off 6" past the binder.
    We are all doomed. Thanks for bursting my bubble. I'm too old and weary to change. I'll pray on it some.

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    ericpmoss is offline VSalonistas
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    When my new bike arrives, it will be with my first-ever sew-ups, and I'm grateful to everyone here for photos and descriptions of folding, mounting, unmounting and repairing them.

    There are a few things that always make me cringe about tires in general, and sew-ups in particular, but maybe unnecessarily so. Can anyone dispel them for me?

    First, when I see any tire folded, the crimping of the tread, casing, bead/basetape and tube inside makes me think "there is where the blowout will happen".

    Secondly, I'm not so sure about this "aging" concept. It makes sense to me that until a tire is needed, one would stretch it on a clean rim and inflate it to keep it as close as possible to its desired rolling dimensions. But purposefully letting the compounds which provide flexibility evaporate seems bad. For example, I wouldn't buy old innertubes, old car tires or old cotton sheets.

    Thoughts?

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    Too Tall's Avatar
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    Aging is a thing of the past. I agree with you. Have on hand a seasons worth of tyres and keep them on clean rims in a dark cool spot. That is as good as it gets.

    Don't fret about folding a spare under your seat. If you periodically remove it to check that the spare glue is still tacky this gives you an opportunity to put air in the spare and check for problems. Done and done ;) In all my yrs. riding tubulars I've never had to chuck one because I ruined it by carrying the beast folded under my saddle...as g-d intended ;)

    Peace, TT

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    Bobonli is offline VSalonistas
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    Default Re: How to fold a tubular

    4.5 years is a long time for a thread to be dormant, so I'm going to wake it up.

    What am I doing wrong here with the folding? No matter which method I use ("the long method" with base tape touching base tape is what is pictured), there's no way I'm getting this tire into the Arundel Tubie bag.



    For reference it's an FMB Paris Roubaix in 27. This is like one of those "how many times can you fold a piece of paper" puzzles! Using the other methods (base tape against tread) just creates an awfully wide stack and what seems to be some strain on the valve.

    Short of attaching a vacuum I think I have as much air out of it that I'm gonna get. This leads me to conclude that I'm (a) doing it all wrong or (b) using a tire that's just too big for the Arundel bag.

    Anyone got an FMB stuffed into an Arundel bag?

    I have options, I know. Next step is to wrap the bundle in tape and strap it to the side of the Arundel and use the bag to carry to CO2, levers and assortment of cutting tools that I've been told are necessary to change the tire in the field. Or just do the toe strap thing.

    Believe it or not, this is the most frustrating part of the tubular experience. The ride is delightful, but I really need to start carrying a spare.

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    Default Re: How to fold a tubular

    1. Roll it up tightly, expelling all the air. Close the valve to seal air out.
    2. You likely won't get that tubular into that bag. It's a very tight bag (I had one or two, but got rid of mine) and not really made for a large-volume tire like the FMB 27. I had a Vittoria or Veloflex in mine.
    3. Rolling is the only way to get a tire in that bag and then with NO air in the tire.
    My name is James Edward Kile

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    teleguy57 is offline VSalonistas
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    Default Re: How to fold a tubular

    The Tubi bag is a tight fit. I don't do this under-the-saddle fold when I put a spare in the bag. I roll the tire; put the tire glue-to-glue for its full length with the stem nestled in between. Then I guesstimate how long the first section should be to approximate the shape of the bag, and keep rolling the tire into that shape. Usually takes me a few tries to get it right, and it's a wrestle to get the finally portion in the bag. Btw, comes out more easily...

    It pains me to see an FMB tucked away for a spare -- and the 27 may be to big for the Tubi. Do get yourself a cheap spare; it will fit bettere, and you can store that elegant (and expensive) tire in a nice place where the casing isn't tortured.
    Bobonli likes this.

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