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  1. #21
    SteveP is offline vSalon Legend
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    Default Re: ww-2 planes

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Thompson View Post
    You're thinking of the Collings Foundation The Collings Foundation - Preserving Living Aviation History for Future Generations They 'barnstorm' the U.S. each year with their bombers and fighters. They have come to Spokane several times in the past. They 'announce' their arrival with a low-level flyover of the city. You can really hear the distinctive sounds of those big round engines and their exhaust pipes barking. I often wonder what the noise of 1,000 of those planes would be like, thinking of the thousand planes bombing raids of WWII.

    About 10 years ago I bought a ride in the Collings B-17. It was an hour of fun, noise and much greater respect for those whose 'office' was a bomber.

    The B-17 that played the Memphis Belle is at a local airport this weekend, offering rides and tours of the plane. She sounds really great as she passes over!
    yeah,
    thats the group.
    they didnt have a p-51 last time... ill look for them when they come back up here.
    super cool...
    as noted...the b-17 seems to fly so slowly... its remarkable...
    we are so used to seeing jets... these things are such a throwback.

  2. #22
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    Default Re: ww-2 planes

    Quote Originally Posted by SteveP View Post
    yeah,
    thats the group.
    they didnt have a p-51 last time... ill look for them when they come back up here.
    super cool...
    as noted...the b-17 seems to fly so slowly... its remarkable...
    we are so used to seeing jets... these things are such a throwback.
    the funny thing is the b-17 went in to service in what? 1939 and 12 years later the B-52 went in to service and that thing still is in service 63 years later. the technology adavanced so quickly re: airframes and engines....and then kind of slowed down unless we're talking about computers.
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  3. #23
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    Default Re: ww-2 planes

    The first aircraft shop I work in did a fair amount of vintage aviation work before their corporate buyout. Lots of heat transfer equipment and such for planes like the P-51, P38, P-61, and even the odd Hawker Typhoon or Tempest and once we recored a pair of ME-110 radiators. You'd be surprised how much copper and brass is in some of those planes.
    Sadly, the new corporate overlords felt there wasn't enough money in it and didn't care how cool it was.
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  4. #24
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    Default Re: ww-2 planes

    We asked the owner of the P 51 what made that high-pitched whine when the planes pass by. Iirc he said it was the oil coolers.
    ...just to win a salami in ridiculous races.

  5. #25
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    Default Re: ww-2 planes

    WWII aircraft junkie myself...

    Occasionally a restored B-17 fly's over the shop here in NH during the summer giving tours to a lucky few. Always have my ears tuned to the sky for that.

    One of my fondest memories is when I was growing up in PA, there used to be an air show in the Quakertown area if I recall correctly. If you were lucky, sometimes a few would fly over head as they would regroup for run's at the show near my house. One summer afternoon, I was outside playing across the street at a friends house (I must have been maybe 7 or 8?) and I heard this low rumble slowly growing and growing. Ran around the front of the house to witness 3 WWII fighter planes roar over head just a bit higher than tree-top level (I know one was a corsair and another was a P-51 but can't recall the 3rd). What a f'n thrill. I'll never forget that day. We need some sound...
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  6. #26
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    Default Re: ww-2 planes

    This is my Cousin's BT-14 Yale. All those Curtis-Wrongs firing feels so right. It's a cool plane.
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  7. #27
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    Default Re: ww-2 planes

    Thanks for this thread. Love these old planes - this reminded me to sift through the old flat storage files and dig these linocuts I did 20 years ago in college. I'm missing my P40 (personal favorite) but found a few others. Done with a sharp gouge and warm lino for sure - don't think I'd have the patience for this today. The slides were a sort of "miniscule expressionism" project where we'd draw with marker/rapidograph directly on the slide as our canvas, then presented to the class critique on the projector. I went with old war planes because I'd already bored everyone in the art center with the subjects of classic cars. I think every instructor at some point tried to get me to loosen up. I'm still trying. There's a Spitfire in there for Musgrave.














  8. #28
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    Default Re: ww-2 planes

    Quote Originally Posted by jerk View Post
    the funny thing is the b-17 went in to service in what? 1939 and 12 years later the B-52 went in to service and that thing still is in service 63 years later. the technology advanced so quickly re: airframes and engines....and then kind of slowed down unless we're talking about computers.
    Tech advanced so fast the B-52 replacements either had short service lives or never made it past prototype.
    See B-58, XB-70 and the Lockheed L-225 nuclear powered bomber.
    The B-52 is fine for taking on the modern fuzzy wuzzies with their Soviet era antiques.

  9. #29
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    Default Re: ww-2 planes

    I love the WW!! era planes-they are beautiful to me. I think of that time as the golden age of mechanical engineering.

    There is a museum nearby that has a Lancaster bomber that they fly occasionally. It is cool to hear those 4 massive piston engines rumbling overhead.

  10. #30
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    Years ago when I lived in a different part of the St Louis area nearly all my rides would take me past the local airport where many of the guys who were into that sort of thing kept / restored their planes. One of my favorites was what I'm pretty sure was a Stearman biplane. That thing was so slow I was always amazed that it managed to stay in the air.

  11. #31
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    Default Re: ww-2 planes

    Nothing in the world sounds better than a round engine...
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  12. #32
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    Default Re: ww-2 planes

    Quote Originally Posted by musgravecycles View Post
    Nothing in the world sounds better than a round engine...
    And nothing leaks more oil. 'Cept maybe an old Triumph.

  13. #33
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    Default Re: ww-2 planes

    This is a neat pic I shot a long time ago across the pond. It's R.J. Mitchell's S.6B - the plane that won the Schneider Cup trophy outright in 1931, and led Mitchell to design the Spitfire.

    Supermarine S6.jpg

  14. #34
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    Default Re: ww-2 planes

    Quote Originally Posted by Saab2000 View Post
    Go to Oshkosh, WI for the EAA's annual show called Air Venture. You won't regret it. I grew up about 25 miles north and went to the show many times. WWII airplanes galore. Actually everything to do with airplanes except (thankfully) airlines. There is everything from homemade hang gliders powered by lawn mower engines (not really kidding) to something absurd like an SR-71 (not anymore of course) and everything in between.
    Just to emphasize the level of workmanship that is common in homebuilts these days; it is really high. When I first started to go to Oshkosh as a kid back in about 1981(?), there were still too many scratch-built planes that were, to be honest, (IMHO, etc.), pretty rough-looking (if serviceable). From what I could tell, many plans were a bit sketchy, (leaving a lot to be figured out by the builder), and some builder newsletters were somewhat crude, e.g. the photo reproduction was so bad you might have trouble figuring out what you were supposed to be looking at. Many of the best planes were completed by people who owned machine shops, sheet-metal fab shops, were engineers, or who had worked in factories building warbirds or cars. The regular guy without any of that knowledge or background had an almost insurmountable learning curve to climb.

    But the last time I went to OSH, a few years ago, I didn't see much rough work, and not only due to the excellent kits from Van's (the RV series), Lancair, and others. Even the average level of scratch-built workmanship seems high to me. And in many cases it's stunning. Perhaps the EAA's Sportair workshops and other resources have brought the level up, or people without the skills to scratch-build instead choose one of the excellent kits. Or don't bring their rough work to the "big show"... In any case, I love Oshkosh. The EAA museum is really nice, too. A side note; if your non-airplane-loving significant other gets sick of the airshow, Oshkosh has a pretty nice little art gallery: <http://www.thepaine.org/exhibitions/index.html> .

    My interest in bicycle framebuilding was originally supposed to be just a brief diversion from the original goal of building a Marquart Charger or Steen Skybolt. Or a carbon update of the Polen Special, my childhood dream-plane. Or Dick Eaves' Nexus Mustang. Or a Cozy-IV. Or a Pitts S-1-11B. Or a replica Ryan STA... (I wasn't short on enthusiasm, anyway). But sometimes diversions end up as the new main idea.

    By the way, if you ever get the chance to go for a ride in a P-51, don't turn it down! I once got about an hour's ride in the back "seat" (former radio and armor area) of one. Unforgettable! A bit embarrassing getting greyed out by sudden-onset Gs that didn't phase the elderly WWII-veteran pilot, but at least I could be happy I kept down my breakfast. One of the most exciting things I've ever gotten to do.

  15. #35
    Mike Mcdermid is offline VSalonistas
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    Default Re: ww-2 planes

    Quote Originally Posted by jerk View Post
    the funny thing is the b-17 went in to service in what? 1939 and 12 years later the B-52 went in to service and that thing still is in service 63 years later. the technology adavanced so quickly re: airframes and engines....and then kind of slowed down unless we're talking about computers.

    Didn't the US military borrow lots of imaginative engineers fro m the other side when the war ended

    I watched a documentary the other night on the horten flying wing which by all accounts there was only one in existence in storage somewhere which was shipped back from the european front

    The german engineers were some pretty clever guys....if not slightly misguided

  16. #36
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    Default Re: ww-2 planes

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Mcdermid View Post
    Didn't the US military borrow lots of imaginative engineers fro m the other side when the war ended

    I watched a documentary the other night on the horten flying wing which by all accounts there was only one in existence in storage somewhere which was shipped back from the european front

    The german engineers were some pretty clever guys....if not slightly misguided
    Those guys were mostly rocket scientists. While some of the German aerospace guys were pretty bright (ME-262 comes to mind) Kelly Johnston an his crew at Lockheed were the super-smart guys of that era. The list of Johnston/skunk works designed planes boggles the mind.
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    Default Re: ww-2 planes

    Quote Originally Posted by spopepro View Post
    Those guys were mostly rocket scientists. While some of the German aerospace guys were pretty bright (ME-262 comes to mind) Kelly Johnston an his crew at Lockheed were the super-smart guys of that era. The list of Johnston/skunk works designed planes boggles the mind.
    The Skunk Works guys did some unreal stuff. Both in terms of ingenuity and speed of development. From the P-38 all the way through to the F-117, with the RS-71 in between.

  18. #38
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    Default Re: ww-2 planes

    Quote Originally Posted by spopepro View Post
    Those guys were mostly rocket scientists. While some of the German aerospace guys were pretty bright (ME-262 comes to mind) Kelly Johnston an his crew at Lockheed were the super-smart guys of that era. The list of Johnston/skunk works designed planes boggles the mind.
    I'd respectfully disagree. Johnston's brilliance really shone post-war. And the most successful fighter of all time, the Hellcat, was Made in USA, but our (arguably) greatest plane, the Apache (aka the Mustang), went from drawing-board to runway in just 90 days courtesy of German-American Edgar Schmued. And nothwithstanding the brilliance of guys like Sir Frank Whittle and Sir Barnes Wallace, Masayoshi Tsuruno, Artem Mikoyan and Mikhail Gurevich, Iluyshin, etc., the stars of the era were the Germans. Heinkel's jets; Messerschmidt's swept-wing research, including the world's first supersonic wind-tunnels; Kurt Tank's phenomenal TA-152; this stuff was easily a step ahead of anything the allies were ready to field - despite a squadron of P-80 Shooting Stars in Scotland in January of '45.
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  19. #39
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    Default Re: ww-2 planes

    Quote Originally Posted by Jaq View Post
    I'd respectfully disagree. Johnston's brilliance really shone post-war. And the most successful fighter of all time, the Hellcat, was Made in USA, but our (arguably) greatest plane, the Apache (aka the Mustang), went from drawing-board to runway in just 90 days courtesy of German-American Edgar Schmued. And nothwithstanding the brilliance of guys like Sir Frank Whittle and Sir Barnes Wallace, Masayoshi Tsuruno, Artem Mikoyan and Mikhail Gurevich, Iluyshin, etc., the stars of the era were the Germans. Heinkel's jets; Messerschmidt's swept-wing research, including the world's first supersonic wind-tunnels; Kurt Tank's phenomenal TA-152; this stuff was easily a step ahead of anything the allies were ready to field - despite a squadron of P-80 Shooting Stars in Scotland in January of '45.
    Johnson and team's post-war work is unreal. The RS-71 alone is mind boggling how they put that bad boy together. Which was built to solve all the problems they saw as a result of their development of the U-2.

    Nothing like building a plane that can fly higher and faster than any Russian SAM known at the time, and was never shot down in three decades of service.
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    Default Re: ww-2 planes

    Quote Originally Posted by theflashunc View Post
    Johnson and team's post-war work is unreal. The RS-71 alone is mind boggling how they put that bad boy together. Which was built to solve all the problems they saw as a result of their development of the U-2.

    Nothing like building a plane that can fly higher and faster than any Russian SAM known at the time, and was never shot down in three decades of service.
    Yeah, it's such an amazing plane. Even after they retired it, I think it was still setting records - just to show everyone how awesome it was. I'd just like to know if the Aurora is a real thing or not.

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